Gardening for Wildlife forum: Conservation project

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Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
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Bonehead
Jan 29, 2016 1:02 PM CST
We have a salmon-bearing creek that runs through our lower property. Years ago we dug a farm pond for the kids to play in and to enhance the area. We are plagued with beavers, who have totally flooded out our road to the back woods. Our local conservation agency has funding specific to our creek. I was hoping they could help us address the beaver problem, but the main dam and lodge are downstream from us so anything we did would not really solve the underlying flooding. They have, however, approved a re-vegetation plan, which would mean we must dedicate 15' on either side of the creek bank for native plants. We have no plans to run livestock or build anything down there. We have tentatively agreed to this, and the next step will be to review the planting plan. I will also want to review whatever the dedication constraints are. Per the nice young man who we are working with - they will plant native willows, ninebark, dogwood, spirea, and others. Sounds good to me, although I'm not a big fan of the blue protective sleeves they tend to use - but it is my understanding those eventually decompose. The conservation folk would come out annually for maintenance until the plants are mature enough to be on their own. I'm slightly ambivalent about 'inviting in' any sort of government agency... thoughts? Here's a couple photos of the area taken from our back deck:

2011 - The tractor is going over the main creek culvert, the culvert from the creek to pond is to the left of the tractor behind the raft
Thumb of 2016-01-29/Bonehead/2b9690

2016 - The road is now the creek and it is almost impassable even with the tractor, the brown grass behind and at the pond edge is invasive non-native reed canary grass. I don't mind it, but the conservation people would like to discourage it (by cutting it back and nurturing native shrubs that would eventually shade-out the invasive grass)
Thumb of 2016-01-29/Bonehead/94bedd

I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: June
Rosemont, Ont. (Zone 4a)
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JuneOntario
Feb 7, 2016 3:42 PM CST
Deb, my thought is "how will you stop the beavers from cutting down the newly planted trees and shrubs?" You'd need a stout wire enclosure of some kind. We wrap valuable trees with fence wire to prevent them becoming part of a beaver dam or winter larder.
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
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RickCorey
Feb 24, 2016 12:26 PM CST
If you invite the local conservation agency in and sign their agreement, would it limit what the next owner of the property could do with that area? If so, it might reduce your resale value.

Even ambiguity can make resale more difficult, especially when a mortgage is needed.
Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Mar 19, 2016 7:33 PM CST
June, I believe the conservation folks enclose the whips in those unsightly blue tubes. Looks rather ugly for a couple years, since they also overplant, so the net result after a fresh planting is a forest of blue tubes with teeny little whips poking out the top. We are rather inundated with canary reed grass, though, which will likely hide the blue tubes until the plants become established. Rick, I have not yet seen their contract and will certainly check out how future owners may be affected. It is kind of my understanding that these type of restoration projects and/or mitigation plantings are for the most part untracked. The conservation people will follow-up for I think he said 4 or 5 years with an annual maintenance, then who knows. I will check these things out before we commit. I also told the guy I wanted to approve their planting plan before they begin. Our project will not happen this spring, but perhaps this fall.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Alex Junge
MN st paul, (Zone 4a)
Plantsmylove
Apr 1, 2016 7:57 PM CST
Sounds fun but yeah I think the beaver would just gnaw the trees up


I know nothing about homeownership as I will never own property but if it effects the decision on the next homeowner I say go for it there's plenty enough mess on this world we live in natives would be good
Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Jun 16, 2016 9:27 PM CST
I've now received their proposed planting plan. In our really wet areas (i.e., standing water) they will thickly plant live-stakes of various willows, crabapple, ninebark, dogwood, and twinberry. These will be planted very close together with a high expectation of loss. In the outer areas where water is not as prevalent, they will plant potted ash, cascara, vine maple, serviceberry and ribes. I presume these will have a better chance of survival. Hopefully this fall will be planting time. Should be an interesting project.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
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gardengus
Jun 17, 2016 4:01 PM CST
Sounds like a good variety of plants
And yum on the juneberry Smiling
Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.

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