Texas Gardening forum: trick to removing nandina?

Views: 1289, Replies: 9 » Jump to the end
Name: Kim
Seguin, TX (Zone 8b)
Image
blueeyes
Feb 8, 2016 11:38 AM CST
I have two nandinas in the front of the house that I want to remove. However, after a lot of digging over the weekend I've discovered this may be a bigger job than I previously thought. We've got one of them dug down about 18 inches right now. Dad is hoping he can use a chain to pull it next time he comes to visit. Has anyone else tried removing these, and if so do you have any tips to share?

Thanks, Kim
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
Region: United States of America Morning Glories Region: Florida Houseplants Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
Feb 9, 2016 10:08 AM CST
Heavenly Bamboo (Nandina domestica) is a lovely plant but it is extremely invasive and if all roots aren't removed it can spread by underground runners. Smaller plants can be pulled out easily by hand but large, mature shrubs will have to be dug out or yanked out by a heavy truck with a chain, as you've stated your dad might be able to do. Seeds remain on the plants for many months so it's a good idea to dig the plants before the seeds appear.
~ Eat, Sleep .... Play in the dirt ~
Name: Kim
Seguin, TX (Zone 8b)
Image
blueeyes
Feb 9, 2016 10:55 AM CST
Thanks Lin! I had a feeling that was about the only way to get rid of these. They are planted too close to the house, and were massive before I cut them back. Even with yanking them out I will probably be dealing with volunteers for quite a while, but at least I know concentrated roundup will do them in. I brush it on after I cut them (no spraying). At least we got the tree that was too close on the other side down over the weekend. Baby steps!

Kim
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
Region: United States of America Morning Glories Region: Florida Houseplants Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
Image
plantladylin
Feb 9, 2016 11:28 AM CST
Nandina has very deep and strong root system so it's good to try to eradicate as much of the root structure as possible but may be impossible to completely eradicate it, even with Round Up! Green Grin! Check the area @ a year later and yank any seedlings that might have sprouted from remaining root fragments. I've heard that seeds can remain dormant in the soil for many months before germinating so that's a good reason to keep an eye on the area too. It's a highly invasive species here in Florida ... and in Texas: http://www.texasinvasives.org/plant_database/detail.php?symb...
~ Eat, Sleep .... Play in the dirt ~
Name: josephine
Arlington, Texas (Zone 8a)
Hi Everybody!! Let us talk native.
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Butterflies Garden Ideas: Master Level Forum moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier Birds Cat Lover Xeriscape
Image
frostweed
Feb 10, 2016 10:30 AM CST
We got rid of ours by digging with pick ax, we had a lot of them all around the house.
We didn't know that they were invasive at the time, all we knew was they were pretty and could take all kinds of punishment. Here are the pictures from our adventure 15 yeas ago. Smiling
We planted Coralberry in its place.

Thumb of 2016-02-10/frostweed/9fa084


Thumb of 2016-02-10/frostweed/fa49c9


Thumb of 2016-02-10/frostweed/2a9049


Thumb of 2016-02-10/frostweed/3733d2


Thumb of 2016-02-10/frostweed/ec8442

Wildflowers are the Smiles of Nature.
Gardening with Texas Native Plants and Wildflowers.
Name: Trish
Jacksonville, TX (Zone 8a)
I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Charter ATP Member Region: Texas Roses Herbs Vegetable Grower
Composter Canning and food preservation Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Organic Gardener Forum moderator Hummingbirder
Image
Trish
Feb 10, 2016 10:40 AM CST

Garden.org Admin

Uggg- I hate nandina Thumbs down

We use a tractor and a chain to remove the big ones. It isn't exactly an elegant solution, but it does get the job done! Green Grin!
NGA COO, Wife, Mom, and caretaker of 90 acres and all that dwell there.
Name: Kim
Seguin, TX (Zone 8b)
Image
blueeyes
Feb 10, 2016 10:41 AM CST
Oh wow Josephine! I will not complain about my two plants then! I may get a pick ax this weekend then and see how much damage I can do.
Texas (Zone 8a)
Passionate about Native Plants
Region: Texas Butterflies Salvias Garden Photography Native Plants and Wildflowers Bee Lover
Birds Hummingbirder
Image
GrammaChar
Apr 10, 2016 2:49 PM CST
I am not a fan of nandina. At a recent Native Plant Society of Texas meeting, we were told that the berries contain cyanide which studies have shown causes internal hemorrhaging in song birds who eat the fruit. Always happy to hear that people are yanking them out. Good luck with your project!
GrammaChar
Name: Cheryl
Kingwood, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Greenhouse Composter Plant Identifier Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Amaryllis
Plumerias Ponds Foliage Fan Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tropicals Garden Ideas: Master Level
Image
ShadyGreenThumb
Apr 12, 2016 1:14 PM CST
Im sorry to be in the minority on this thread. Love me some nandina! The laciness, pretty fall leaves and if course stunning red berries. But I'm a shade gardener. Nandina grow suuuuuper slowly for me. And I don't have a hedge full if them. Even in what little sun I do have, they are manageable. I know nandina are said to like full sun. Perhaps giving them everything it wants is not such a good idea?
Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love Truly, Laugh
uncontrollably, And never regret anything that made you Smile.

georegbarwic
Nov 17, 2016 9:41 PM CST
Thank You!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Texas Gardening forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Dianthus 'Nyewood Cream'"