Ask a Question forum: Inoculants: Pea/Beans

Views: 133, Replies: 4 » Jump to the end
Name: Austin Monroe
Frankston, Tx (Zone 8b)
Amonroe
Mar 19, 2016 6:09 AM CST
How important is it to inoculate peas and beans?
And where can I get some in store, I live in east Texas, and can find it at my local garden store or the big box stores for that matter.
Thanks
Name: Rob Duval
Mason, New Hampshire (Zone 5b)
Region: New Hampshire Vegetable Grower Daylilies Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Ideas: Level 1 Tomato Heads
Annuals Hostas Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Spiders! Dog Lover Region: Northeast US
Image
robertduval14
Mar 19, 2016 10:54 AM CST

Plants Admin

First off, welcome to ATP!

I hear of these inoculates and see them for sale in garden catalogs, but to be perfectly honest, I have never had any trouble growing peas or beans without it. I'd be really curious to find out exactly what issues it is supposed to help with, as I don't seem to have any issues with either of these crops. I wonder if it's location dependent...

Hope someone can come along and provide more insight.
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Mar 19, 2016 10:54 AM CST
Hi And Welcome to ATP. Welcome!

Beans and peas, and all legumes, are "nitrogen fixers" meaning they snag nitrogen out of the air and store it in their roots. Then you plow under those roots and the nitrogen goes into the soil to feed the next generation of plants. An important consideration if you are an organic farmer.

But legumes don't always produce extra nitrogen so someone has figured out that farmers can help that process along by treating their seeds with an inoculant - a bacteria that helps the plant store even more nitrogen. But, you have to get the right inoculant for it to work. And if you are not an organic farmer, you don't care how much nitrogen the plant stores. (By the way, the nitrogen is stored in little bulges on the roots - like mini-potatoes.)

Luckily, legumes are smart and know how to do that on their own. They will grow an adequate amount of their own bacteria and start snagging the nitrogen out of the air all by themselves. You don't need to treat them with the inoculant; they will make enough nitrogen for what they are intending to do: produce beans and peas.

Daisy
Name: Austin Monroe
Frankston, Tx (Zone 8b)
Amonroe
Mar 19, 2016 3:23 PM CST
Thank you both for the speedy replies. And for the helpful advice. I've been holding off a few days from planting some sugar snaps and cow peas ever since I read an article that mentioned inoculants. After finding out what the "benefits" I planned on planting said crops, one of each with and one of each without the inoculants, as to test the claims.

But after your insight Daisy, and reading your post Robert, I think I'm going to pass on my current plan.

Thank you both for the help and y'all's warm welcome. This is my first experience with forums of any kind. Thanks for making it a pleasant one.
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Mar 19, 2016 4:24 PM CST
You are welcome. Smiling

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Dianthus 'Nyewood Cream'"