Ask a Question forum: Pink Dogwood tree help.

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Name: Brad Overcash
Snyder Texas (Zone 7a)
snyder76
Mar 30, 2016 12:03 PM CST
I am a new homeowner and last fall planted a pink dogwood in my front yard. I live in west texas in zone 7a and have never planted a tree before. I was so excited when my dogwood stated producing leaves about 3 weeks ago. We have not had much rain this year and with temps getting close to freezing this past month I may have gotten too overprotective and over watered it because the tips of the leaves started yellowing and are turning a brownish color in some places. I did notice what I think may be fungus gnats in the mulch. Ive been looking online and gosh there is just so much information it is hard to know what to do to help my tree. I was hoping someone with more experience might have some advice. Thank you in advance.
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Name: Art
Florissant, MO (Zone 6b)
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ArtD
Mar 30, 2016 2:41 PM CST
Hi Brad,

Assuming you don’t have a dogwood borer causing the problem (let’s hope not!), you’re probably just over watering the tree. Iron chlorosis is another possibility. Dogwood trees are pretty susceptible to that. If you have a way to check the soil pH, that would be a good idea. Your dogwood tree cannot absorb iron if the soil is too alkaline (above 7.5).

Check this site out (link below) about iron chlorosis.


http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental...

Art
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Mar 30, 2016 7:18 PM CST
I agree with Art. It looks like chlorosis. Chlorosis is caused by too much water or alkaline soil (I am going to ignore the possibily of borers).

You can try giving it some 'Azalea and Rhododendron' food. The 'Azalea and Rhododendron' food has the right nutrients to utilize the iron in the soil. If you add some iron at the same time, all bases are covered.

If you feel you are wateering too much, water less. The borers... still not talking about them.

Daisy
Name: Art
Florissant, MO (Zone 6b)
Hummingbirder Annuals Bee Lover Butterflies Garden Photography Seed Starter
Garden Ideas: Level 1
ArtD
Mar 30, 2016 9:23 PM CST
DaisyI said:
The borers... still not talking about them.


Well, ya never know, just covering all the bases Hilarious!
But actually I agree not very likely.

Art

Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Mar 30, 2016 10:36 PM CST
No, I've had borers. Really don't want to talk about them.
Name: Alyssa Blue
Ohio (Zone 5b)
Bloom where you're planted
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AlyssaBlue
Mar 31, 2016 6:26 AM CST
Snyder76- I have had both white and pink dogwood. They're both so beautiful! In fact, my father in law gave us when we I got married........no pressure to keep that alive.....Lol.

For some reason, the white are a lot more hearty. With pink it's more care, and may be a little challenging, but worth it.

While I do not live in TX, I can say for sure that dogwoods do not like mulch, and it looks like there is some in the picture. Just move the mulch away, leave at least an 18" circle with no mulch at the base, but shape it to form a dish around the tree so the water would funnel towards the trunk. I'm wondering if that may resolve your problem with the tree correcting on its own.

Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Mar 31, 2016 10:41 AM CST
I hadn't noticed the mulch and it could be the problem. Read this:

http://grounds-mag.com/mag/grounds_maintenance_mulching_basi...
Name: Brad Overcash
Snyder Texas (Zone 7a)
snyder76
Apr 1, 2016 11:56 AM CST
Oh my goodness. Such great advice from everyone. Thank you so much! Daisyl the mulch article was interesting. I had no idea!

As an update I tested the PH of my soil and it came in just under 7. That may be a false representation however. When planting I added manuer and compost to the hole when planting so Im not sure 7 is entirely accurate. I added some kelp and bone meal to help. I also dug the mulch and dirt away from the root flare and leveled out the surrounding dirt to prevent too much water from collecting. Of course today it is raining here and not going to help if this is an over watering issue. Im going to hold my breathe, cross my fingers, pray and hop on one foot in hopes the tree pulls thru.
On a side note I noticed when digging the dirt away from the root flare that I have some major worm (not grub) families living in my dirt. I used a spade and with every dig produced at least 2-5 worms in various sizes. I was very glad to see that. I had planted two of these dogwoods originally. The one we are discussing is in my front yard. The other is in the backyard and shows no signs of growth and is not leafing out. I only point this out because most of my landscaping energy has been focused on my front yard. When I bought this house last year there was no landscaping at all. I started on the front yard for curb appeal, including a 70 ft wrap around flowerbed, a walkway, and the dogwood and a maple tree. The dogwood in my backyard is all by its lonesome and has not received the attention the one in the front has. Of course it could just be a bad tree but Im thinking that the original soil may have not been so great by the performance of the dogwood in the back yard.

All of this to say I think you all helped me diagnose the problem and hopefully correct it. I could not be more grateful and hope I may be able to return the favor someday.
Name: Alyssa Blue
Ohio (Zone 5b)
Bloom where you're planted
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AlyssaBlue
Apr 1, 2016 12:47 PM CST
Man, that's a pampered dogwood! I haven't added anything to the hole before so I can't comment on those. But I wonder about the one in the back, if it's also a pink dogwood? I had a pink dogwood one time that just wanted to look flat. Meaning, it didn't want to grow upwards, just grow outwards. Almost like a creeping shrub on a stick. We ended up moving so who knows that happened to it. (That was around the time where dogwoods were dying from a virus and I had to liberally spray Immunox over the entire tree to keep the leaves on the branches. The symptom was leaves drying up and falling off, FYI).

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