Clematis forum: How do I know for sure which pruning type my clems are?

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Name: Cindi
Wichita, Kansas (Zone 7a)
Charter ATP Member Plant and/or Seed Trader Permaculture Roses Ponds Peonies
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CindiKS
Apr 5, 2016 11:12 AM CST
Last summer, we had plenty of rain and generally wonderful weather. This past winter was also kind to us. This spring, I'm finding clematis all over the place that I had written off for dead a few years ago! The name tags are long gone. Tags have also disappeared for plants that did grow and bloom the past few years. I've already cut most of the prolific vines back this spring. How can I tell for sure which pruning group each belongs to? Will the bloom times be off since I pruned all of them? March weather was unseasonably warm here, so bloom times may be off anyway.
Any help here is much appreciated!
Cindi
Remember that children, marriages, and flower gardens reflect the kind of care they get.
H. Jackson Brown, Jr.
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Tomato Heads Houseplants Garden Ideas: Level 1 Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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pirl
Apr 5, 2016 12:25 PM CST
Post photos as each one blooms and we can all help you identify them.
Name: Jason
Gold Bar, Washington (Zone 8b)
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riverman123
Apr 10, 2016 7:37 PM CST
Yes, bloom times will be GREATLY affected if you went and cut all of them back recently. bloom times are the easiest ways to tell what type of pruning they should have gotten... basically, if they are spring bloomers, then you prune them as soon as flowering is done so they can put on growth asap. this is where next years flowers will appear. if they are summer bloomers, then you prune them in early spring, to allow fresh new growth to begin, which is where this years flowers will appear...

the ones that bloom on new growth, or this years growth, will be fine. they typically get pruned back hard this time of year anyway. HOWEVER - the ones that bloom on last years growth, will probably not flower this year, since last years growth has been removed.
Name: Cindi
Wichita, Kansas (Zone 7a)
Charter ATP Member Plant and/or Seed Trader Permaculture Roses Ponds Peonies
Lilies Irises Daylilies Dog Lover Beekeeper Garden Ideas: Master Level
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CindiKS
Apr 11, 2016 10:53 AM CST
That's helpful, thank you! I have a few blooming now, which is a full month ahead of "normal". I need to figure out a way to mark them for future pruning. The problem is, I have nearly 100 clematis, and they are scattered everywhere, through every shrub, on trees, on roses, a few creeping along the ground, and several wound through each trellis or arbor.
So...this years' blooms is already off because of the way I pruned this spring. Next year, if I left them grow and take notes, I'll know the correct way to prune in 2018, right? That, and I can catch them blooming and have you all try to identify them for me, right? I do have some lists and receipts.
My roses, daylilies, iris and hostas all have name tags. I don't know why I didn't keep track on the clematis, because names and type really matter on them, and they don't matter on the roses and hostas. Iris and daylilies I label because garden clubs get REAL cranky when they come to tour and any plant is missing a name. *Blush*
Remember that children, marriages, and flower gardens reflect the kind of care they get.
H. Jackson Brown, Jr.
Brookline, NH (Zone 5a)
Daylilies Bee Lover Region: New Hampshire Hostas Tomato Heads
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dc0145a
Apr 29, 2016 11:47 AM CST
CindiKS
you wrote: "My roses, daylilies, iris and hostas all have name tags. "

Just curious what you use to label your hostas / daylilies?

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