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whiteedy
May 8, 2016 2:40 PM CST
I bought and planted a peach tree three weeks ago. at the beginning it had a beautiful flowers and later peaches. recently, we had too much rain in Houston Texas. after the rain the leaves are almost dying.
is that because of too much rain or less rain and fertilizer?
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
May 8, 2016 3:17 PM CST
A picture of the tree, close up of the leaves, plus one of the whole area including the tree would help a lot.

Did the tree stay wet for days and days during the heavy rains and flooding? If it's in a low spot, or the soil settled in that area from the wet weather, it could have been wet for a while even after the flood water was gone.

It could have some root rot going on. The roots basically drown without some air in the soil i.e. drying out between heavy waterings.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

whiteedy
May 8, 2016 3:39 PM CST

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Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
May 8, 2016 4:07 PM CST
Hm, the leaves are really going reddish, rather than brown. You didn't have a sudden cold snap recently, did you?

I'd try a douse with some dissolved Epsom Salts - about a tablespoon dissolved in a gallon of water. It is basically magnesium sulphate, and magnesium deficiency can look like that, a reddish color to the leaves. If it doesn't respond, by greening up again, then another solution might be the ticket, but the Epsom salts surely won't hurt. If it does work, you'll see a difference in color in a few days, and you should put another gallon on after a week or so.

Have you given the tree any fertilizer since planting it? A balanced, timed release pelleted fertilizer for fruit trees would be a good idea about now if not.

I hate to say so but that little tree is really much too young to support producing fruit. The first year after you plant a fruit tree, you really should remove all the fruit to let the tree grow a good root system and lots more leaves. Nobody likes to hear this advice, I know.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
May 8, 2016 8:03 PM CST
In case it helps, the symptoms of specific nutrient deficiencies in peach are pictured here:

http://www.clemson.edu/extension/peach/faq/peach_nutrition.h...
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
May 8, 2016 8:15 PM CST
Wow, feeding peaches is complicated! Great site.
Porkpal

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