Texas Gardening forum: Besides Hostas, What Else Can't You Grow In Central Texas?

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Name: Sandi
Austin, Tx (Zone 8b)
Texas Gardening
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Bubbles
May 12, 2016 9:29 AM CST

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Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
May 12, 2016 9:41 AM CST
Shoot, my Hosta has been the best thing I have for a couple of months. I ran out and took this photo of in April because I thought it was going to hail and shred it. Then I stacked some old rusty lawn chairs over the whole thing. It did hail, but it had tiny stones not a lot bigger than sleet. It still looks good today because the horrible wind and hail that was nearby last night skipped me once again. More than 2" of rain was all I got.
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Donald
Name: Sandi
Austin, Tx (Zone 8b)
Texas Gardening
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Bubbles
May 12, 2016 9:54 AM CST

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That's a beauty! Do you leave it out all year?

I thought mine were all goners last fall, so I put the pots where I could find and reuse them this spring. Almost all of them came back, even though I left them to drown and freeze in pots. Wish I could grow them inground.
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
May 12, 2016 10:02 AM CST
Yes, it stays out in the cast iron pot all year. That thing is far to heavy to pick up and move around. I planted 3 Hostas that came in 4" pots with the idea I'd just grow it as an annual. They all returned the next spring, though one soon died. What's here are the other two plants, though one is significantly larger than the other. I got some 'bagged' fern sold as 'Lady Fern' from Wal-Mart and stuck it in with the Hosta in spring 2015. The fern never really disappeared all winter and for a brief time early this year it was the main focal point. Then the Hosta simply took over. Big Grin I want to do one of those big blue-green jobs and use one of the big plastic cattle protein tubs sort of half way buried in the ground for the container, but haven't done it.
Donald
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
May 12, 2016 10:07 AM CST
What I can't grow and have tried to grow numerous times are perennial Oriental poppies. I love those things and if I plant them in the fall they will grow just fine in fall, winter, and spring. Then the summer kills them and they don't return. I keep thinking that someday I'll find the perfect spot combined with a plant that has a bit of heat resistance and have success, but I think I'm probably wasting my effort when I do it. My last time was to attempt them in a container thinking I could guarantee perfect drainage and move them into the shade where it's cooler during the summer. Didn't work.
Donald
Name: Audrey
Central Texas (Zone 8a)
Organic Gardener Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses Butterflies Photo Contest Winner: 2015
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Esperanza
May 12, 2016 10:17 AM CST
Im impressed with the hostas. I just told someone last week who is from up north that hostas would not look good once the heat kicks in. Hmm...maybe she will prove me wrong. Im cultivating heat tolorent semperviums for my I can not grow that here plant.
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Name: Sandi
Austin, Tx (Zone 8b)
Texas Gardening
Forum moderator Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Master Gardener: Texas
Region: Texas Tropicals Plumerias Ferns Greenhouse Garden Art
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Bubbles
May 12, 2016 10:21 AM CST

Moderator

Don't Oriental Poppies have a really long tap root? It's too hot for them here, I think. You're to be congratulated to get them to stick around most of the year! I may have to try them.
[Last edited by Bubbles - May 12, 2016 10:23 AM (+)]
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Name: Sandi
Austin, Tx (Zone 8b)
Texas Gardening
Forum moderator Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Master Gardener: Texas
Region: Texas Tropicals Plumerias Ferns Greenhouse Garden Art
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Bubbles
May 12, 2016 10:26 AM CST

Moderator

Esperanza said:Im impressed with the hostas. I just told someone last week who is from up north that hostas would not look good once the heat kicks in. Hmm...maybe she will prove me wrong. Im cultivating heat tolorent semperviums for my I can not grow that here plant.
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Well, the Hostas made it on their own. I was no help to them. I did see some huge ones yesterday in two gallon pots at Costco. They were very tempting, but "my Keeper" was with me and I couldn't get loose. Sighing!
Name: Audrey
Central Texas (Zone 8a)
Organic Gardener Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses Butterflies Photo Contest Winner: 2015
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Esperanza
May 12, 2016 10:32 AM CST
Rolling on the floor laughing Darn Keepers ruining all the fun. Rolling on the floor laughing I tried hostas one time and I just watched them struggle and have never tried them again. I will not be tempted. Ok? I will not be tempted. Whistling
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
May 12, 2016 10:57 AM CST
I have several semps now. They don't like the blistering heat of summer, but they survived it. I'm rearranging this year so the ones that were more sensitive to the sun and heat will be growing in the shade of the oak trees. I expect they will be much happier. I had a couple that were always in the shade and they have done okay when it's hot. Mine are all looking good right now.

These two get a lot of direct sun and they've been in these containers 3 years now:
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This one got sun as well and it didn't flinch. Green in the summer and purple maroon by the time spring arrives. The main rosette here is out to the edge of the container, so I have to try and remove the offset or find a larger container or something.
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These DO NOT like the summer heat. They survive, but not well. They recover when it cools off and have grown and covered up all the dead stuff and look nice at the moment. They are moved under the oak tree shade now. We'll see if that works better for them this summer.
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These were some I got at Home Depot last spring where all their plants were standing in water and rotting. I picked up some to try and salvage and these made it, but they have never been exposed to a lot of sun. The first one now has multiple offsets shooting out and will have to be repotted. These pots aren't suitable anyway because they have a built in saucer and I have to be careful and empty them so they don't sit in water. I'm surprised I haven't forgotten to do that one too many times. They have been kept under the eave, which helps.
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Last year when we started getting all the rain in May, this one got rot. It was a large nice plant and I did keep it in the shade, but ended up pulling it all out and tossing it in an empty clay pot. It gradually got drier and drier and in early fall I got brave enough to take some and pot it back up. Some didn't make it, but now these that are left are beginning to increase. Heat and water never is a good combo for succulents, I think.
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I think you will be successful growing them if you can give them shade in the summer and avoid letting them get too wet when it's hot. I find the last part the trickiest thing with any succulent.

Donald
Name: Audrey
Central Texas (Zone 8a)
Organic Gardener Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses Butterflies Photo Contest Winner: 2015
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Esperanza
May 12, 2016 11:58 AM CST
Oh, your semps look really great! I think I got the hang of them now. I lost a few things to that rain last year. 28" in 23 days is just insane. I even brought a few of mine in last summer and put them in a south facing window. Took them back out for the winter. I bought several hundred mixed noids from ebay. Only about 50 survived. Those that survived have pupped and flourished. So, when I said cultivating that was my fancy way of saying the ones that I did not kill Hilarious!
Texas (Zone 8a)
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GrammaChar
May 12, 2016 1:35 PM CST
@Donald, I love your succulents. I've moved mine under the porch until we're done with this patch of rainy weather. Then they'll go to the back patio where they get morning sun but are protected from the sunburn of the 5 p.m. Death Star. The only other threat is the squirrels, who like to nibble on them at times.
I am curious about your hanging terra cotta planters. Are those something you made by drilling holes in the pots (and if so, will you share your secret?).
Nice display.
GrammaChar
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
May 12, 2016 2:18 PM CST
GrammaChar said:@Donald, I love your succulents. I've moved mine under the porch until we're done with this patch of rainy weather. Then they'll go to the back patio where they get morning sun but are protected from the sunburn of the 5 p.m. Death Star. The only other threat is the squirrels, who like to nibble on them at times.
I am curious about your hanging terra cotta planters. Are those something you made by drilling holes in the pots (and if so, will you share your secret?).
Nice display.


The dratted squirrels are why nearly everything I grow is hanging. That's not foolproof, but it helps. Here everything is better off elevated somehow or the other. Either with a stand or just a tall container. Keeps the toads from making day beds and armadillos don't climb over anything that's not fairly short.

Yes, I just take a terra cotta pot and drill holes using a masonry bit. Regular terra cotta isn't quite as hard as the yellow or brown material. I don't know why. The yellow-looking pots especially are really hard. I've never seen a new one of those, though. The ones I have are pass-alongs or found at a garage sale or junk store. The bits don't seem to last very long. I have used them to drill into glass and ceramic, but those are so hard I've pretty much confined that sort of drilling to getting a drainage hole in the bottom of a container. I've heard that you can prevent chipping on the back side by using a little bit of duct tape over the area where the bit will come through, but I haven't tried that. I have learned to make rudimentary slings as well. It's faster, but I'm not very good at getting them sized. They are simple and they work. The cord needs to be as UV and weather proof as you can find or it may only last one season. I like how sisal looks, but it's lucky if it even makes through a single summer.


Donald
Name: Jolana
Mountain City, Tx (Zone 8b)
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Bee Lover The WITWIT Badge Region: Texas Garden Art Irises
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froggardener
May 12, 2016 7:08 PM CST
Love the hostas and the semps, I don't have any semps left between the snails and squirrels

Everything I have planted at the new place, when I go back over there, the squirrels have dug all around them. I picked up a trap today and I'm going to catch them and turn them loose over near Barton Creek mall, Hilarious! Hilarious! Hilarious!
Gardening is learning, learning, learning. That's the fun of them.
You're always learning !
Helen Mirren
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
May 12, 2016 7:21 PM CST
That's pretty mean, Jolana nodding .
Donald
Name: Jolana
Mountain City, Tx (Zone 8b)
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Bee Lover The WITWIT Badge Region: Texas Garden Art Irises
Daylilies Butterflies Dragonflies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers Hibiscus
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froggardener
May 12, 2016 7:24 PM CST
I'm just kidding...or am I??? Rolling on the floor laughing
Gardening is learning, learning, learning. That's the fun of them.
You're always learning !
Helen Mirren
Name: Sandi
Austin, Tx (Zone 8b)
Texas Gardening
Forum moderator Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Master Gardener: Texas
Region: Texas Tropicals Plumerias Ferns Greenhouse Garden Art
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Bubbles
May 12, 2016 8:14 PM CST

Moderator

@froggardener Leaving those squirrels near Barton Creek mall would be a very bad idea. Tipping the balance of Nature, so to speak. I understand ridding your new garden of squirrels will probably force all the raccoons around the Barton Creek area to migrate to the outskirts of Seguin. If you think the squirrels are bad, wait till you have a backyard full of pesky raccoons! Whew! Whistling
Name: Jolana
Mountain City, Tx (Zone 8b)
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Bee Lover The WITWIT Badge Region: Texas Garden Art Irises
Daylilies Butterflies Dragonflies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers Hibiscus
Image
froggardener
May 12, 2016 8:49 PM CST
HAHAHAHA, Oh I think I named the wrong creek Green Grin!
Gardening is learning, learning, learning. That's the fun of them.
You're always learning !
Helen Mirren
Texas (Zone 8a)
Passionate about Native Plants
Region: Texas Butterflies Salvias Garden Photography Native Plants and Wildflowers Bee Lover
Birds Hummingbirder
Image
GrammaChar
May 12, 2016 9:17 PM CST
@needrain - Thank you for your reply about your hanging pots. I know what you mean about the squirrels and armadillos. I use pot clips but am running out of places to put them. I also have a deer problem, so am always looking for ways to get plants up out of their reach. I appreciate your sharing of the masonry bit solution, and I'm going to steal it! Hilarious!
GrammaChar
Name: Sandi
Austin, Tx (Zone 8b)
Texas Gardening
Forum moderator Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Master Gardener: Texas
Region: Texas Tropicals Plumerias Ferns Greenhouse Garden Art
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Bubbles
May 12, 2016 9:34 PM CST

Moderator

Quick thinkin'! Thumbs up @froggardener
[Last edited by Bubbles - May 12, 2016 9:36 PM (+)]
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