All Things Gardening forum: What kind of grubs are these?

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springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
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Frillylily
May 14, 2016 7:53 PM CST
I'm wondering what type of grubs these are, and if the milky spore will get rid of these? I did have japanese beetles in my yard pretty bad last summer, so wondering if they are that?


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Name: Jennifer
48036 MI (Zone 6b)
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jvdubb
May 15, 2016 7:05 AM CST
They look like the grubs that turn into Japanese beetles. But I'm no expert
Name: Cheryl
Kingwood, Texas (Zone 9a)
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ShadyGreenThumb
May 15, 2016 7:10 AM CST
I agree
Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love Truly, Laugh
uncontrollably, And never regret anything that made you Smile.
Name: Cheryl
Kingwood, Texas (Zone 9a)
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ShadyGreenThumb
May 15, 2016 7:15 AM CST
Sounds like Milky Spore will do the [url=trickhttp://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/pesticides/what-is-milky-spore.htm!]trickhttp://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/pe...[/url]
Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love Truly, Laugh
uncontrollably, And never regret anything that made you Smile.
Name: Gary
Wyoming MN (Zone 4a)
hostasmore
May 15, 2016 7:51 AM CST
They look like June bug larvae to me, but I haven't had Japanese beetles yet.
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
May 15, 2016 12:34 PM CST
I seen a few June bugs, but only a handful. I had hundreds of the others. They tried to eat my hibiscus clean away!
They also love roses. I ended up spraying the shrubs, but I tried not to spray the blossoms themselves because I did have some visiting bees. Best to spray early morn before they get too active.
Name: Gary
Wyoming MN (Zone 4a)
hostasmore
May 15, 2016 2:12 PM CST
Check out the web. It says the larvae of the lily beetle are only 3/8" long. They cover themselves with their own excrement.

June bug larvae can easily be an inch or more long. The ones in your photo are not covered in their own excrement. I often encounter them when digging in my gardens. I always leave them exposed and usually the Robins end up eating them. Did you find them on plants or in your soil? How big are they?
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
May 15, 2016 6:36 PM CST
They were an inch long, and they were just under some heavy rocks I had laying out in the yard, they were just laying on the surface when I lifted the rocks. There were hundreds of them. I lifted probably 40 large rocks and there were 8 or 10 easily under every rock. I smashed them all.
Name: Amanda
KC metro area, Missouri (Zone 6a)
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pepper23
May 15, 2016 6:43 PM CST
Make a wooden tray feeder and stick them in there. Birds will gobble them up in no time. Smiling
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
May 15, 2016 6:46 PM CST
Guess I didn't think of that, not sure it will do anything for my grub problem though, the birds might get fat however! I was wanting to use milky spore, but then I read that you have to buy the right kind of stuff depending on what kind of grubs you have. To me they are just ugly grubs, I dunno what they are! Shrug! But the milky spore is kind of pricey so I want to make sure I get the right stuff.
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
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pirl
May 15, 2016 7:08 PM CST
Milky Spore has specific instructions and works best when all surrounding properties also use it - it may be impossible to convince everyone that it's needed. If you are the only one using it the JB's will fly in from neighboring properties to attack you roses, hibiscuses, clematises, dahlias, etc. It's a very tough battle to fight.
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
May 15, 2016 7:29 PM CST
I want to reduce moles in my yard, I do have a large yard, an acre and a half.
Name: Amanda
KC metro area, Missouri (Zone 6a)
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pepper23
May 15, 2016 7:47 PM CST
Best thing you can use is Castor Bean plants or use the oil and drive them out. Never surround your property otherwise you will trap them and have a mess on your hands. Start on one end and go from there. Your goal is to drive them out and make your property taste like crap to them.
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
May 15, 2016 9:35 PM CST
well I have a 5 lb poodle, and a 2 yr old, so poison as that is, that is not an option for me
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
May 20, 2016 6:16 PM CST
Milky spore only works (and apparently not as well as previously thought) for Japanese beetle larvae. White grubs are the larvae of Scarab beetles and there are several other species of Scarab beetle white grubs that look like JBs and are not susceptible to milky spore - if you're patient and not squeamish there are charts on the web for differentiating the different grubs but it involves looking at a pattern of spines on their rear ends. A beneficial nematode is apparently considered the most effective non-chemical control. I don't know what the trade name may be but the species is Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. This article from the U of Missouri may be of interest:

http://ipm.missouri.edu/MEG/2009/10/White-Grubs-A-Common-Tur...
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
May 21, 2016 9:33 AM CST
Thank you! I am not squeamish, and I want to get RID of these things, there are SO many I can't hardly believe it honestly. Under every rock.... I will use the link you posted too, great info!
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
May 21, 2016 10:16 AM CST
If you have any difficulty fitting yours to the pictures there are some other sites that have pics of other Scarab grubs also, I just wasn't sure which were most likely in your area so went with the MO site.

One that we have around here that isn't on that Missouri list is the European chafer. On the MO site above you can ignore the black turfgrass ataenius because it's a little itty bitty thing compared to the others!

One thing with peering at the raster pattern is that the grubs usually take a very dim view of proceedings making it difficult to see. I saw a suggestion the other day that setting them in sand with their bottoms up can help. Another less pleasant way is to cut the grub in half so that it can't curl the raster away from you. Have fun Hilarious!
Name: Greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
May 21, 2016 12:28 PM CST
To my old eyes they look like June Bug grubs but I'm often wrong.

Hey @ JRsBugs, can you take a look?
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~~"Leaf of Faith"
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
May 21, 2016 12:30 PM CST
I have not noticed any June bugs around here though.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
May 22, 2016 4:38 AM CST
greene said:To my old eyes they look like June Bug grubs but I'm often wrong.

Hey @ JRsBugs, can you take a look?


Greene, a number of related beetle grubs look the same. Although you can sometimes figure out what they are based on time of year and size, because of mixed generations/species you would normally differentiate by looking at the raster pattern. From past years' experience you could make an educated guess but I know in this area we only had June beetle grubs for as long as I can remember, then a couple of years ago European chafer grubs started appearing (much to the delight of the neighbourhood skunks!). They pretty much look the same.

This page shows larger pictures of the raster pattern on the larvae and also the adult Scarab beetle species to which they belong. There are many species of Scarab beetle, these are just some of the ones that are garden pests:

http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/HYG-2510-12

I think your call to Janet won't work because there's a space between the @ and the user ID so you may want to try again.
[Last edited by sooby - May 22, 2016 5:09 AM (+)]
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