Insect and Bug ID forum: Bee eating wasp, or wood eating wasp?

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Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Jun 22, 2016 7:48 PM CST
This scenic painting on an old window frame is a favorite for Carpenter bees to bore holes into. Today I noticed a little different looking hole, and in a new spot on the frame (normally on the very bottom). At first I assumed it was just a new Carpenter bee hole, then a wasp appeared and went in and out of the hole several times. So I am wondering is is a good wasp that eats Carpenter bees? Is it a bad wasp that bores like Carpenter bees?
Thumb of 2016-06-23/Seedfork/ef880f
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Name: Janet Super Sleuth
Near Lincoln UK
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JRsbugs
Jun 22, 2016 9:15 PM CST
It's a good wasp. Probably Monobia quadridens, it will take small caterpillars for it's young.

It utilises old nest holes made by other bees or wasps or any other cavity it can find.

http://bugguide.net/node/view/958720/bgpage

http://bugeric.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/wasp-wednesday-four-to...
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Jun 22, 2016 9:25 PM CST
Fantastic to know that they eat leafrollers. Every year my Cannas are attacked by those darn leafrollers and I hate them, I think I can learn to like this wasp.
Name: Melanie Long
Lutz, Florida (Zone 9b)
Larva tested, Pupa approved!
Butterflies Hummingbirder Birds Bee Lover Enjoys or suffers hot summers Region: Florida
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mellielong
Jun 22, 2016 9:38 PM CST
Just an FYI, those leafrollers are probably Brazilian Skippers (aka Canna Skippers). They are a butterfly.

http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Calpodes-ethlius
Moderator of the best forum on ATP, the Butterflies, Bees, and Birds forum!
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Jun 23, 2016 6:05 AM CST
It would be fine with me if they all went back to Brazil!!!
Name: Janet Super Sleuth
Near Lincoln UK
Charter ATP Member Organic Gardener Garden Photography Bee Lover Dragonflies Cat Lover
Butterflies Birds Plant Identifier I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Spiders!
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JRsbugs
Jun 23, 2016 7:51 AM CST
The article mentions several types of moth caterpillar as their prey, in several families which are mostly smaller caterpillars. No butterfly cats are mentioned, it seems they prey on moths but I don't know for sure. Insects such as wasps and Tachinid flies 'usually' target certain species.

I can't copy and paste those mentioned but it includes fruitworm moths, maple webworm moths, grape leaf-roller.

Nature is designed to control species, it's a food chain. If there was no control then damaging species would take over. Man is too often responsible for interfering with nature's delicate balance then people wonder why they have a problem. Kill your predators, then you will have to kill your pests, and line the pockets of the big companies who delight in telling you how to kill everything.

My garden, when I first filled it with beds of plants, had bad infestations of aphids. I learnt to leave them alone as I found ladybug larvae amongst the masses of aphids, then you have syrphid fly larvae which live on aphids along with birds which will pick aphids off your plants along with caterpillars. Destroying your caterpillars will leave birds with no food for their young. We have a small bird called the Blue Tit, it nests only once a year and has up to 10 young. Each young bird needs up to 100 caterpillars per day. Other birds such as Sparrows and Starlings feed their young on all sorts of insects, wasps included!

Unless a species is a very destructive recently introduced species (red lily beetle!) then nature should be left to do the job, it's been doing it since time began.

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