Ask a Question forum: Rose Thrips

Views: 377, Replies: 9 » Jump to the end
Name: Steve Wysocki
Alanson, Michigan (Zone 4b)
Bigbuck754
Jun 28, 2016 12:43 PM CST
How can I control this beetle that wants to destroy my garden and raspberries?
Organically preferably!
Please Help!!!!!
Thank You.
Steve Wysocki
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Jun 28, 2016 1:17 PM CST
Welcome! I haven't heard of a rose thirb beetle nor can I find any reference to one or a similar name. It doesn't sound like the name but might you mean the Japanese beetle? Or maybe a rose chafer? Could you verify the name or post a picture of the beetle please. Thank You!
Name: Karen
NM , AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Greenhouse Cactus and Succulents Adeniums Garden Art
Plumerias Hibiscus Houseplants Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Dog Lover Cat Lover
Image
plantmanager
Jun 28, 2016 1:20 PM CST
Welcome, Steve! I think he meant rose thrip. Here is some info about them.
http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/ros...

Here is some info from our database:
Thrips are very small (about 1/16 inch long) and slender; usually tan or dark colored. Immature thrips are white, yellow, or orange. Adults can fly, jump, or run quickly. They are difficult to see without a hand lens, though they may look like little threads on the plant.

These pests may not survive long inside. However, some types of thrips are capable of living indoors on houseplants year-round. Thrips feed by scraping leaves or flowers with their rasping mouthparts and then sucking the fluid that’s released. Damaged leaves develop irregular silvery streaks or splotches. Flowers become streaked or distorted. Where feeding is heavy, you may also see small shiny black drops of excrement on the leaves.

Control options: Washing, physical removal, disulfoton, bifenthrin, permethrin, imidacloprid resmethrin, pyrethrins (at least two to three applications sprayed once every 10 - 14 days are usually necessary).
Handcrafted Coastal Inspired Art SeaMosaics!
[Last edited by plantmanager - Jun 28, 2016 1:22 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1196877 (3)
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Jun 28, 2016 1:25 PM CST
I wondered about thrips but a specific species of thrips isn't going to destroy a garden or raspberries Confused Thrips are not a beetle either.
Name: Robyn
Minnesota (Zone 4a)
Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters Tomato Heads Garden Photography
Image
robynanne
Jun 28, 2016 1:41 PM CST
Do ladybugs or lacewing larva like to eat them?
Name: Karen
NM , AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Greenhouse Cactus and Succulents Adeniums Garden Art
Plumerias Hibiscus Houseplants Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Dog Lover Cat Lover
Image
plantmanager
Jun 28, 2016 4:52 PM CST
sooby said:I wondered about thrips but a specific species of thrips isn't going to destroy a garden or raspberries Confused Thrips are not a beetle either.


I wondered the same thing, but saw this:
Thrips are primarily phytophages; that is, they eat plants and parts of plants, such as pollen, flowers, leaves, fruits, twigs, or buds. They consume flower heads of daisies and dandelions. In addition, they feed on onions, carrots, melons, cucumbers, peas, beans, roses, gladiolus, irises, and mullein. Plant-feeding thrips pierce a hole using their mandibular stylet to suck out the contents of individual cells. Pollen-feeding thrips ingest the contents of individual pollen grains.

Some species that live in litter eat fungi or decaying plant materials. Others are gall inducers. There are some species of thrips that feed on mites, small insect larvae, and other species of thrips.

Handcrafted Coastal Inspired Art SeaMosaics!
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Jun 28, 2016 5:19 PM CST
On reading that it sounds like hoards of thrips are gobbling up everything in sight Smiling They're teeny tiny things and slurp up plant juices, they don't chew things up and swallow them and the plants they attack depends on the species of thrips. There are some, like western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) that feed on a wide range of plants and others that feed on a more limited number of plant species. They're far smaller than an aphid, for example and don't look like beetles. In fact unless one looks very closely one isn't very likely to even see them. Hopefully Steve will clarify.

Edited to add, speaking of size comparison, I just remembered I took a picture some time ago of a thrips and an aphid to show how tiny a thrips is:

Thumb of 2016-06-28/sooby/fa0ddc

[Last edited by sooby - Jun 28, 2016 5:24 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1197050 (7)
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Jun 29, 2016 5:01 AM CST
Steve, I assume it was you who changed the title to thrip. So if you're certain the raspberry problem is thrips, this article details several less toxic options for treatment:

http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/pests/pesticide/hgic27...

Since you call it rose thrip (several species of thrips can affect roses) does that mean you are having problems with thrips on roses too? Thrips are not usually a big problem on raspberries, and the thrips that affect raspberries aren't going to destroy a whole garden but at least one thrips species is common to both raspberries and roses.

But are you sure you have correctly identified the culprit, especially since you refer to it as a beetle? If you're not certain and can post pictures of the damage and/or better yet the insect we can help better.

BTW not that it's important in the general scheme of things but the word thrips is both singular and plural, so one of them is still a thrips.
Name: Steve Wysocki
Alanson, Michigan (Zone 4b)
Bigbuck754
Jul 28, 2016 9:14 AM CST
Thumb of 2016-07-28/Bigbuck754/d82ea8


Thumb of 2016-07-28/Bigbuck754/d73eb1


Thumb of 2016-07-28/Bigbuck754/7f5c12


Thumb of 2016-07-28/Bigbuck754/0fe6b1

This is the little nuisance that hits me every year in the Spring. I do no think that it's a Japanese beetle. What is this beetles name Please? !
Thank you for all of your comments! Thank You!
Steve Wysocki
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Jul 28, 2016 9:52 AM CST
It looks like a rose chafer:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/303457/bgimage

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by Paul2032 and is called "French Marigold"