Insect and Bug ID forum: What IS This Cute Thing?

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Name: Cheryl
Brownstown, Pennsylvania (Zone 6a)
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: Pennsylvania Bee Lover Butterflies Dragonflies
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nativeplantlover
Jul 8, 2016 9:17 AM CST
Hi All!
Something I've never seen before. Pretty sure it's a bee or even a kind of sawfly? There were several of them late afternoon. They ranged in size(I'm guessing)from slightly under an inch to slightly over that. What was so cute was the manner of wing movement-very soft and flutterly-like, closer to the way a butterfly moves than to a bee. I heard the neighbor kids saying-" eww wasp! hornet! I sure hope they weren't over there. Mom didn't grab the insecticide can. They look gentle, as if they can't even sting. Anybody that can ID it? Thank You! in advance!
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"My work is loving the world. Here the sunflowers, there the hummingbird — equal seekers of sweetness. Here the clam deep in the speckled sand. Are my boots old? Is my coat torn? Am I no longer young, and still not half-perfect? Let me Keep my mind on what matters, which is my work which is mostly standing still and learning to be astonished." — Mary Oliver, from Messenger
Southeast US (Zone 7b)
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GoatDriver
Jul 19, 2016 10:45 AM CST
They are pretty much harmless..It is called a Sculptured Resin Bee (Megachile sculpturalis), native to east Asia, recently introduced to North America. It was first reported in North Carolina in June, 1994. They are opportunistic and nest in existing wooden cavities, rather than excavating their own. They effectively pollinate kudzu.
More info on them here - http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?search=Megachile+sculptur...

I collected and donated specimens of this bee on my property for a Taxonomic Paper written by Katherine A. Parys PhD. at USDA-ARS Southern Insect Management Research Unit, Stoneville, MS..
Click the following link for the paper at the Biodiversity Data Journal...... http://biodiversitydatajournal.com/articles.php?id=6733&disp...

Here's a photo that I took of some on my property


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[Last edited by GoatDriver - Jul 19, 2016 1:49 PM (+)]
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Name: Cheryl
Brownstown, Pennsylvania (Zone 6a)
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Region: Pennsylvania Bee Lover Butterflies Dragonflies
Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Birds Spiders! Cat Lover Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
nativeplantlover
Jul 19, 2016 12:42 PM CST
Hi Goat Driver and thank you...
I also posted this on the butterflies and bees forum. I did discover what it was right after finally asking. I wrote a bit about it over there. I just haven't figured out how to mark the thread as "solved". D'Oh! Although they aren't native, and definitely not so beneficial for pollinating kudzu(the plant that ate the south) :
I was intrigued with them. They were only here for several days. I've already read the info on the first link but not the second, so I'm off to do that! Thanks again and if you can possibly mark the thread on B&B forum would you mind doing that for me?- if not dont worry about it Thumbs up
"My work is loving the world. Here the sunflowers, there the hummingbird — equal seekers of sweetness. Here the clam deep in the speckled sand. Are my boots old? Is my coat torn? Am I no longer young, and still not half-perfect? Let me Keep my mind on what matters, which is my work which is mostly standing still and learning to be astonished." — Mary Oliver, from Messenger

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