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Naples, florida (Zone 10a)
cilla1080
Jul 24, 2016 12:15 PM CST
What can I fertilize ixora with to correct chlorosis, my soil in southwest florida is alkaline sand.
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
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Dutchlady1
Jul 24, 2016 2:04 PM CST
Welcome! cilla1080
Ixora like Gardenia and Azaleas like an acidic environment. Therefore give them some fertilizer that is suitable for these types of plants. They also sometimes get chlorotic and a bit of Epsom Salt will help with that. Good luck! Crossing Fingers!
Naples, florida (Zone 10a)
cilla1080
Jul 24, 2016 5:32 PM CST
Thanks! My ixoras were planted one month ago. Landscape is new construction, and soil is builders fill. Im pretty sure they were just stuck in the dirt with zero amendments or fertilizer. I added some palmgain around them about 3 weeks ago on top of the pinestraw mulch. A few plants have yellow leaves starting to show on new growth. I have read online that ixora can become iron deficient and need micronutrient sprays. I am a gardener from up north where soil is more acidic, so this is new to me. Would spraying the leaves with miracid help? Most of the ixoras I see around my area look pretty healthy, so Im wondering what others use on them to keep the leaves green.
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
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dyzzypyxxy
Jul 24, 2016 8:48 PM CST
Builder's fill will be even more alkaline than our regular sand, Cilla. Top dressing generously with compost mixed with some peat moss might help a lot. The Palm Gain fert will be ok for now, but if you can get some that is specific for acid-loving plants like azaleas that will be better. Palms need a lot of micronutrients that Ixoras probably don't want.

Foliar spray with Miracid will only be a very temporary fix, you need to amend the soil. Those Ixoras have now outgrown the potting soil they originally grew in, and are putting their new roots out into that awful builder's fill. Amending heavily and often with organic materials will help long term.

For the short term, get a box of Epsom Salts at the drug store or grocery store, and mix a tablespoon per gallon of water. Water them every couple of weeks with this, a gallon or so per bush. Should make them look better until you can get the soil improved. For future reference, the first book I bought when I moved to Florida was entitled "The newcomer's survival guide to gardening in Florida" (or something) and in the intro, the author stated "The soil here will hold the plant up, you have to do everything else.". Referring to the grey sand most people find in their garden, once they get away from the builder's fill dirt.

Find out if your landfill makes compost, and get as much as you can, to have on hand for whenever you're planting anything. The compost made by Sarasota County is excellent, and free if you go and load it yourself. I've even paid a teenager with a pickup truck and his friend to go get it for me. Cheap at the price!
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Jul 25, 2016 3:46 AM CST
Where in Naples are you, @Cilla1080 ?
Naples, florida (Zone 10a)
cilla1080
Aug 31, 2016 10:09 AM CST
Dutchlady1 said:Where in Naples are you, @Cilla1080 ?


HI I just saw this....I'm just off 41, near the botanical gardens in a new development. I did try putting down some epsom salts today as my plants don't look so good. I wasnt sure how much to use though so I just sprinkled some around the bases and watered in. Also put down some Acid forming fertilizer too, slow release.


Naples, florida (Zone 10a)
cilla1080
Aug 31, 2016 10:17 AM CST
Thank you....Lots of good info. I know I have to change this awful soil. I did put down the correct fertilizer for ixora and also used some epsom salts. As soon as it stops raining here in goes the peat moss and compost. I think there is a recycling place in naples where it is free.



Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Aug 31, 2016 10:56 AM CST
To lower soil pH one would normally use elemental sulfur - you'd need a soil test to determine how much to use. Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) supplies magnesium but does not lower soil pH. With a high soil pH your problem is more likely a micronutrient issue such as iron or manganese which can usually be fixed by lowering the soil pH with sulfur.

If the new leaves are pale but with the veins still green that implies iron and/or manganese deficiency. If it is the older leaves then magnesium sulfate should help. In general one would expect the former with a higher pH soil.

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