Ask a Question forum: Eggs? on my strawberry plants

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Name: Terri Osipov
Rome, Georgia (Zone 7b)
Every day in the yard is a GOOD day
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IJsbrandtGA
Aug 22, 2016 12:45 PM CST
Uh oh....look what I found on two of my dead strawberry plants. Can anyone identify what kind and if these are eggs? My pictures aren't the best; they are very tiny tan, round balls that are in masses but not symmetrically placed. Thank you!



Thumb of 2016-08-22/IJsbrandtGA/f101a7


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Thumb of 2016-08-22/IJsbrandtGA/9c2a86

"Speak to the Earth and it shall teach Thee" Job 12:8
Name: Sharon Rose
Grapevine, TX (Zone 8a)
Grace of the Lord Jesus be with all
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Altheabyanothername
Aug 22, 2016 9:51 PM CST
Terri, I am sorry but it looks like Southern blight or fungus! I know that tomato plants can be sprayed with baking soda mixture for blight. Hopefully some fruit and vegetable gardeners will pop in and be able to better help you!
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Aug 23, 2016 4:03 AM CST
Here's an article about southern blight. I don't know if baking soda would help. Are you thinking to apply it as a soil drench, Sharon? There is some evidence that raising soil pH may help. There are some other suggestions towards the end of this article:

http://www.apsnet.org/edcenter/intropp/lessons/fungi/basidio...
[Last edited by sooby - Aug 23, 2016 4:39 AM (+)]
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Name: Sharon Rose
Grapevine, TX (Zone 8a)
Grace of the Lord Jesus be with all
Daylilies Garden Art Irises Region: Texas Clematis Lilies
Amaryllis Bulbs
Image
Altheabyanothername
Aug 23, 2016 6:59 AM CST
@sooby Sue, except for herbs and onions, I have not grown fruits or vegetables in 35 years. So I hesitate to tell a fruit or vegetable gardener anything. But I saw the blight and wanted to start Terri on the right path, and give an option.

That being said I have lots of crazy fungus that appears here. I would spray with baking soda mixture all surrounding plants for prevention.The spores are there. Spray the soil where the plants were removed 3x in one day, then drench. So where you knew the spores were you especially do not want fungus spreading. Drenching first might spread spores. Sometimes I have directly sprinkled baking soda on a problem. After the other blight question, I did wonder about pH, soil and baking soda. I know after rain or water changes in a chlorinated pool you can add baking soda, that allows the other chemicals to work properly. That is a pH thing, so maybe the reason baking soda works in soil is a pH thing. If you think about it, lots of fungus will form after a rain which might have caused a temporary? soil change.
Baking soda works for me on fungus and southern blight and alot more. It might be my sandy soil that allows it to work so well. It also might be the large number of hot temperature days here. My soil solarizes on a regular day Hilarious! . Now if I could just get all the weed seeds to I would be happy. Thank you, Sue for all the hard work you do for everyone Hurray!
May everyone be blessed with successful gardening endeavors!
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Aug 23, 2016 8:59 AM CST
Southern blight is a warm climate disease for the most part, it's not common where there are cold winters. The hard thing is to kill the sclerotia (the mustard seeds), this fungus does not produce asexual spores. The pH change does sound plausible although it might be better for the soil to use lime if calcium is low. I did find this article that seems relevant, haven't had time to read every word though.

http://www.apsnet.org/publications/phytopathology/backissues...
Name: Terri Osipov
Rome, Georgia (Zone 7b)
Every day in the yard is a GOOD day
Dog Lover Bee Lover
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IJsbrandtGA
Aug 23, 2016 9:19 AM CST
I agree Again, thank yoU! Thank You! Yes, that appears to be the correct diagnosis. I have been inundated with fungus and bug issues (especially leaf footed bugs!!) this year; honestly, I am exhausted. I found this website http://hort.uwex.edu/articles/southern-blight/ and it was very helpful. It seems that when I find information on certain problems it gets too technical for me to follow, but this was written well and was easy to understand; i.e. it gives me hope! Fortunately, when I found it, I dug up both plants and disposed of them in the garbage. I also removed some of the soil in an attempt to collect all of the sclerotia. I will go back out there today and remove more of the soil. Sighing!

Group hug I can't say thank you enough for the kindness and assistance that you have given me this summer. I have learned sooo much and look forward to being able to pay it forward someday myself.

Thank you for the links. Great information that I will have to finish reading later today. I am headed to the garden to attack this latest problem. Smiling I am hopeful and happy though, because any day in the garden is a good day!
"Speak to the Earth and it shall teach Thee" Job 12:8
[Last edited by IJsbrandtGA - Aug 23, 2016 9:33 AM (+)]
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