Vegetables and Fruit forum: Is this real thing?

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Name: Fiat
Modesto -The Central Valley of (Zone 9b)
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fiat
Aug 29, 2016 12:27 AM CST
Hi, I am not a real edible plants grower, yet. But have hit over with this weird video; still wonder if it is a real thing! Would appreciate any comments.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MSXTZYjsNww

Edit: Apology! Most probably it's not real at all! Please ignore (or better delete this thread).
If a plant looks good, smells good, don't eat it, grow it!
Fiat
[Last edited by fiat - Aug 29, 2016 12:33 AM (+)]
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Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
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ediblelandscapingsc
Aug 29, 2016 12:38 AM CST
nope fake
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
Image
ediblelandscapingsc
Aug 29, 2016 12:50 AM CST
We don't judge, as a matter of fact my wife asked me about this video today after seeing it on facebook. One unique combination that is possible is grafting tomatoes on potatoes. You can also graft almonds, plums, peaches, nectarines, and apricots all on 1 tree.
PS I like the photo of the Feijoa flower in your profile pic.
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
Name: Robyn
Minnesota (Zone 4a)
Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters Tomato Heads Garden Photography
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robynanne
Aug 29, 2016 9:23 AM CST
My friend is growing a Frankenapple tree. It is dwarf root stock with branches from many different apple types grafted on.
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
Image
ediblelandscapingsc
Aug 29, 2016 11:08 AM CST
I wish apples grew better here in SC but it's such a high maintenance crop in my area and for those of us who don't like to spray it's virtually impossible to get good fruits. Sounds like your friend is good at grafting do you know how to graft as well?
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
Name: Robyn
Minnesota (Zone 4a)
Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters Tomato Heads Garden Photography
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robynanne
Aug 29, 2016 12:03 PM CST
ediblelandscapingsc said:I wish apples grew better here in SC but it's such a high maintenance crop in my area and for those of us who don't like to spray it's virtually impossible to get good fruits. Sounds like your friend is good at grafting do you know how to graft as well?


I've never tried. I get the general idea.
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
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ediblelandscapingsc
Aug 29, 2016 12:24 PM CST
You should try it's fun and rewarding.
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
Name: Robyn
Minnesota (Zone 4a)
Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters Tomato Heads Garden Photography
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robynanne
Aug 29, 2016 12:36 PM CST
Funny that this is coming up now. I've been tending to this apple tree that was a seed my daughter found in a green apple from the store. I've told her the seed is likely for something very different from the apple, and it probably isn't a dwarf size tree, so I don't want a giant apple tree in our yard. I might, however, be able to graph the stem onto another dwarf tree. .. I don't know, something to think about.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Aug 29, 2016 1:01 PM CST
robynanne said:Funny that this is coming up now. I've been tending to this apple tree that was a seed my daughter found in a green apple from the store. I've told her the seed is likely for something very different from the apple, and it probably isn't a dwarf size tree, so I don't want a giant apple tree in our yard. I might, however, be able to graph the stem onto another dwarf tree. .. I don't know, something to think about.

We had a very, very old large Haralson Apple tree, I like the big ones they are much tougher, that finally dies of old age two years ago; actually the wind toppled it but the middle of the trunk was rotting.
It started to rot over ten years ago or so, I had big black ants and wood peckers hammering at it, so I covered the bad part with Eucalyptus mulch for quite a few years; did the same with a Mulberry Tree also.
The ants went away and the rot slowed down it not stopped but you can no longer get Eucalyptus mulch here anymore so I had to stop.

We let a sucker grow up from the stump but as expected it is not another Haralson but some little yellow crab apple so if you plant that seed you do not know what you may get.

If you graft that stem, it still may grow far larger than you want.

As an aside, I trimmed our Haralson to the point it looked like a very tall scare crow, about twelve years ago, because it was too thick with branches; with in two years it was thicker and taller than it had been but the new branches were not as strong as the old one and I started to have large branches break off , three or more inches in diameter, from the weight of the apples.

Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
Image
ediblelandscapingsc
Aug 29, 2016 1:13 PM CST
RpR is right grafting onto it will still give you a large tree but you can keep it at a manageable size with pruning. yearly pruning is a must to keep it small. if you skip a year it will get away from you you'll have to remove large limbs which isn't good for trees. Grafting a columnar apple on it may be a good idea as they don't do too much branching and tend to grow more vertically.
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
Name: Fiat
Modesto -The Central Valley of (Zone 9b)
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fiat
Aug 29, 2016 4:05 PM CST
Wow, this thread I started is supposed to be dead! But now it seems to have become an interesting discussion about plant grafting...

Daniel: Thanks for your response, but what Feijoa flower pic you're talking about? Is it the "pineapple guava" flower as in my avatar? If it is, I have to say it's the first edible (and delicious) fruit I ever grow. How about your marvelous fig expertise! It's at the end of harvest for the CA mission fig here in the central valley and it's the first joy I got to taste the heavenly flavor of fresh fig - I only tried dry fig until now!
If a plant looks good, smells good, don't eat it, grow it!
Fiat
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
Image
ediblelandscapingsc
Aug 29, 2016 5:00 PM CST
I love the pineapple guava's flowers they are so pretty. I was indeed talking about your avatar, Feijoa is another name for pineapple guava. I'm glad you was able to taste one and able to taste a fresh fig. Figs are one of life's great joys, they are truly amazing when fresh. So many people are turned against them because of the taste of fig newtons and dried figs but if they every try a fresh one it's like a whole new world to them. You should try growing some. They grow very well in The Central Valley and there are hundreds of varieties available out west that will blow black mission out the water. I grow around 120 varieties here in the South East.
You are so luck to live where you do. you have access to a wide range of delicious fruits and are in the perfect climate for growing many different edibles. Another fruit you should be on the look out for if you never had one is a persimmons. The Asian ones will start ripening next month-jan and are out of this world. Just don't get the ones shaped like giant acorns because they are bitter. instead look for the ones that look like orange tomatoes. You can find them by the names Jiro and fuyu in most markets and they also will grow well in your area. If you like grapes there is a company by the name of the grapery out west and they grow cotton candy grapes try those also the name sums up the taste perfectly and it's honestly the best grape in the world. Unfortunately you can't grow them and neither can anybody else unless you are a contract grower and as of now Grapery is the only one contracted to do so.
As you can can tell I'm kind of obsessed fruits and encourage others to grow as much as they can. If you like eating fresh fruits and trying new things there is a group in your area called the California Rare Fruit Growers or CRFG for short you should check them out. They are a great group of people and very knowledgeable about what will grow in your area and also what taste the best.
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
Name: Fiat
Modesto -The Central Valley of (Zone 9b)
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fiat
Aug 29, 2016 11:23 PM CST
Daniel, How kind of you for telling me (and everybody here) such wonderful things about fruits... Actually early this year I did some research on fig fruit and growing them and almost got to order one from internet... But for all the conditions and concerns... I passed, yet my friend here had quite a bit harvest this summer and I had my first chance tasting real yummy fresh figs. And yes, I was able to harvest a small crop of Feijoa last year first time and the PA guava tasted wonderful as the flavor was all different from other fruits. This year I expect to have a bigger crop to enjoy Smiling As for the Persimmons, I had quite a joyful experience in tasting them before moving to U.S. from Asia. Mainly we had two kinds of Persimmon in Taiwan: one has yellow-orange skin which meat is more crunchy with refreshing flavor, another one has orange-red skin which meat is slippery, smoothy, and soft with aging flavor. Both are wonderful fruits. I do think there are growers here who may be growing P, but can't find their crop in supermarkets... The ones I do find in supermarkets or grocery stores are mostly, if not all, from foreign countries (could be Mexico?) and they all taste no joy. Too bad.

I thank you for providing info about CRFG. Not decide to formally turn a fruit grower though.
If a plant looks good, smells good, don't eat it, grow it!
Fiat
Name: Carol
Santa Ana,Ca. (Zone 10b)
Sunset zone 22
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
Aug 30, 2016 5:35 PM CST
fiat, Wheather or not you want to be a grower, the CRFG may be a good source for the plants you do wish to grow. Also a good resource about growing them. I was wanting to grow an Asian persimmon , myself, but found out that they won't tolerate our water here, so I didn't waste my money.
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
Image
ediblelandscapingsc
Aug 30, 2016 8:39 PM CST
That's odd because UC Irvine is just a hop and skip from you and they have a huge collection of persimmon trees. As a matter a fact it's the largest collection of Asian persimmons that I'm aware of anywhere.
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
Name: Carol
Santa Ana,Ca. (Zone 10b)
Sunset zone 22
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
Aug 31, 2016 11:10 AM CST
I was not aware of that. I had read that they suffer in high ph soil and the one I saw here in the mobile home park had 1 fruit and all the leaves were brown and crispy at the edges.
Our water is about 7.5 ph and we haven't had enough rain in the last 4 years to leach it. Everything is showing the effects.
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
Image
ediblelandscapingsc
Aug 31, 2016 1:07 PM CST
alkaline water is great for humans but not too great to certain plants, maybe Irvine is treating their water somehow. The crispy leaves you seen could be a magnesium deficiency in conjunction with the higher ph. You can steep 1 cup of wood ash in a 5 gallon bucket of water for 24-48hrs and water your plants with with that to help combat the high ph in your water but with burn restrictions in CA finding wood ash may be hard. Another alternative would be using a product called "ph down" that is used in hydroponic setups. You can try using sulfur or phosphoric acid to lower the waters ph but If you're adding solid materials to your water you'll need allow the material to steep just like with the wood ashes.
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
Name: Carol
Santa Ana,Ca. (Zone 10b)
Sunset zone 22
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
Image
ctcarol
Aug 31, 2016 3:43 PM CST
Yep! Wood ash is about as hard to come by as water.
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
Image
ediblelandscapingsc
Aug 31, 2016 8:47 PM CST
I'm sorry Carol I wish I could send you some of this rain we are about to get off the storm in the gulf. We should get enough to share with you and TX both. Have you lived out west your entire life? If so are the droughts getting worse or has it always been like that and the media's just hyping it up?
­čî┐A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered­čî┐
Name: Carol
Santa Ana,Ca. (Zone 10b)
Sunset zone 22
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
Image
ctcarol
Sep 1, 2016 4:13 PM CST
Yes to both questions. They have had plenty of rain in northern Ca. Good thing, since that's where much of our water comes from, but our official rain fall total for the past 12 months is 5. something ". Our season normally is only about 13". I came from England to the west coast at 4 months, I'm told, and never had any desire to live elsewhere. There are some very nice (and wet) places to the north, but I'm pretty much stuck here for the duration. As I'm sure you are aware while the rest of the country has been flooding, the west has been burning.

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