Ask a Question forum: Climbing rose trouble

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Name: Terri Osipov
Rome, Georgia (Zone 7b)
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IJsbrandtGA
Sep 10, 2016 11:22 AM CST
About 2 months ago I noticed black spot on my climbing rose. I trimmed it back and removed the leaves then sprayed it with rose fungicide. Here it is 2 months later the black spot has come back but worse is that it has never blossomed this summer. Does anyone know what might be causing this? It has always bloomed perfectly in the past. The growth has not slowed down at all as you might be able to see. Thank you!
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"Speak to the Earth and it shall teach Thee" Job 12:8
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Sep 10, 2016 11:37 AM CST
What is the name of the rose? Some bloom only on old wood from the previous year so maybe you removed them when you trimmed it back.
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
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dyzzypyxxy
Sep 10, 2016 9:28 PM CST
Black spot is an insidious fungus that hangs around and comes back once it's gotten started on a rose. Housekeeping is paramount to stopping it. You need to collect every leaf that has any spots, including removing them from the plant, and especially pick up every leaf off the ground to stop the spores from flying around and re-infecting your clean leaves.

I'd also use a baking soda spray to prevent infection of clean leaves. 1/2 tsp. baking soda to a quart spray bottle and spray it often because it washes off with sprinkling or rain. It won't 'cure' spots that are already there, but it changes the pH on the leaf surface so it's not hospitable for the fungus to start.

Make sure you aren't watering in the latter part of the day, also. Late watering that wets the leaves is an invitation to fungal spores to make themselves at home on the wet leaves during the night. Water early in the morning if you're using sprinklers that wet the leaves.

The whole infection may have started when you had a spell of really rainy weather earlier in the season. Btw if you will fill in your profile with your location, we'll have an easier time advising you, knowing what your weather and climate conditions are.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Terri Osipov
Rome, Georgia (Zone 7b)
Every day in the yard is a GOOD day
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IJsbrandtGA
Sep 12, 2016 3:36 PM CST
Hi @Sooby & @dyzzypyxxy,

I can honestly say that I have been very good about cleaning up dead leaves. I go out on my walk every morning and pick up dead debris around all of my plants, not just the roses. I've had to deal with several fungus issues this summer, so garden hygiene is on the top of my list. And, I only water at the roots to avoid splashing water; I am a reformed sprinkler user now as well!

Sue, I can't remember the name of this rose since I purchased it so long ago, but I would be willing to bet that I cut off too much when I moved the rose. I think I will take the day tomorrow to peel off all the infected leaves and then just leave the canes. Perhaps next year I will be rewarded with blossoms once again, at least I hope so. I need to apply the same fixes to my Julia Child rose and my Wild Blue Yonder. They are both fighting black spot as well - way on the other side of the garden.

Elaine, I have been a member for a while with my location etc. all filled in. I am wondering if I entered my question without being logged in, i.e. I posted my question as a visitor maybe?

Thanks again, so much! Terri


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"Speak to the Earth and it shall teach Thee" Job 12:8
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
Sep 12, 2016 4:43 PM CST
I would not be too concerned about the black spot. In the humid south it is ubiquitous. It will not kill your rose
Porkpal
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Sep 12, 2016 4:56 PM CST
I agree, its not pretty but probably not deadly either.

While you're cleaning up the plants, I would tend to not remove any leaves that are still mostly green. They are still nourishing your plants. The mature spores that are going to fly around are more likely on the dead or dying leaves.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

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