Ask a Question forum: Corkscrew willow tree

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Jetlou
Sep 16, 2016 2:14 AM CST
Can the roots of a willow tree planted right next to a party wall cause problems. Also I am concerned about it being about 18-24ft from my bungalow.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Sep 16, 2016 5:27 AM CST
Welcome! It's not the biggest or worst willow to have near the bungalow since it is a little distance away but I'm not sure I understand the situation with the party wall. Planting any tree immediately adjacent to a house is not a good idea. Are you on a septic system? Is there any chance you could post a picture?
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Sep 16, 2016 4:52 PM CST
Welcome! to NGA

Corkscrew willows get just as large just as fast as weeping willows. Not only is the space too small but they are brittle. A wind from the right direction will send that tree right through your window (or take out your party wall). If the tree is close enough to the wall, the trunk will get too large and push the wall over.

I think they are beautiful trees but they need a lot of space.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Sep 16, 2016 5:08 PM CST
DaisyI said:

Corkscrew willows get just as large just as fast as weeping willows.


Corkscrew willow from U of Florida Extension:
"A small to medium-sized, upright spreading tree of about 30 feet in height with a 15-foot-spread...."
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/st577

Weeping willow from Missouri Botanical Garden:
"....... It grows to 30-50’ (sometimes to 60’) tall and as wide."
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFind...

Then there are others like Salix alba 'Tristis', quoting Missouri Botanical Garden ".. This is an upright, fast-growing, deciduous tree than grows to 50-80’ tall with erect branching that typically forms a broad, loose, open crown."
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFind...

Or black willow, Salix nigra "... a medium to large, fast-growing, deciduous willow tree that typically grows to 30-60’ tall on single or multiple trunks topped by a spreading, rounded but sometimes irregular crown. It may soar to as much as 140’ tall in optimum growing conditions."
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFind...

[Last edited by sooby - Sep 16, 2016 5:12 PM (+)]
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Name: Alyssa Blue
Ohio (Zone 5b)
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AlyssaBlue
Sep 16, 2016 7:59 PM CST
We have a corkscrew willow that is very large- I would try to find something else if it has to be near any structures. Best spots for the corkscrew willow is to be near ponds or in open areas.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Sep 17, 2016 4:55 AM CST
I'm interpreting the question as most likely something a neighbour, municipality or other entity has already planted near the bungalow so I'm not sure Jetlou can choose something else. My initial, badly worded, comment meant that if it's 24 feet away it's not the major problem that one of the bigger willows would be, which still isn't to say that it's necessarily a good placement, just not as critical. If it is 24 feet from the bungalow, and the root system is also 24', i.e. 12' in radius for example, the roots are still 12' from the building, assuming nothing else between is vulnerable like a septic system. It sounds to me as though the party wall is someone else's?

Do we know which "corkscrew willow" it is? I assumed 'Tortuosa' because that's the one usually referred to as corkscrew willow, but there are other cultivars:
http://garden.org/plants/search/text/?q=Corkscrew+willow&but...
[Last edited by sooby - Sep 17, 2016 5:17 AM (+)]
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Name: Deryll Keatting
Nevada, Ohio (Zone 5a)
Deryll
Sep 20, 2016 1:16 PM CST
Jet,

The corkscrew willow is a beautiful tree and extremely fast growing when it is young, but they have very brittle branches and like other willows make a miserable lawn tree as they age. The
Corkscrew isn't a long lived tree, but the trunks grow rapidly, and they do shed a lot of branches, and often the whole tree can come down in a storm. Not the best tree for close to a house.
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Sep 20, 2016 1:21 PM CST
Yes, that is exactly what I was trying to say: brittle and prone to come down in the first big wind.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Sep 20, 2016 1:33 PM CST
Jetlou was specifically asking about the roots and may, or may not, already know about willows' above ground bad habits. It sounds like a disagreement between neighbours and already a fait accompli, but that's just me reading between the lines. I still don't understand the party wall question. To me a party wall is an interior division between two row houses or semi-detached. Does it mean something else in the USA, assuming that's the location?
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Sep 20, 2016 5:25 PM CST
Sue, I am assuming Jetlou is referring to a 'party fence wall' separating two properties, not a 'party wall' which would be a common wall inside a building. Party fence walls are made of some sort of masonry or stone, no wood.
Name: Laurie Basler
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
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lauriebasler
Sep 20, 2016 10:36 PM CST
Where did Jetlou go. Ok since he\she is gone, can I just say; when someone (usually new peeps) asks a question and then is never to be seen again, it is sort of awkward like a nervous giggle. For some reason it always makes me laugh. I don't think they ever mean to, I always imagine they went to a bunch of forums and joined, to ask THE question, and then they can't remember which forum they asked the question at and lost their password anyway and just said to heck with it.!!! Or they just think it's fun to watch people talk to themselves. lol
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Sep 21, 2016 1:34 AM CST
Rolling on the floor laughing You are talking to yourself. The whole rest of the country has gone to bed... What are WE doing up?
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Sep 21, 2016 3:52 AM CST
DaisyI said:Sue, I am assuming Jetlou is referring to a 'party fence wall' separating two properties, not a 'party wall' which would be a common wall inside a building. Party fence walls are made of some sort of masonry or stone, no wood.


Thanks, Daisy. So I guess since the concern is with the roots, it is either that the roots will cause subsidence and affect the integrity of the wall, or that the roots will come under the wall Into the next door garden.....Jetlou doesn't seem to have posted the question on another forum, Laurie, might have on another site I suppose. Shrug!



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