Ask a Question forum: Need advice for daily gardening My elephant-ear houseplant was severely wilted w

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RaySmile
Sep 27, 2016 9:56 AM CST
I face a severe problem that almost most of my houseplant leaves have been severely wilted
I don't know what to do?, I brought them in front of window to absorb direct sunlight, and also used animal fertilizer, decrease the amount of water during the week and still I'm trying to find out a way to get out of this situation, anyone might help me at least eliminate the wilt I tip my hat to you.
Kind Regards
Ray
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[Last edited by RaySmile - Sep 29, 2016 11:45 AM (+)]
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Name: Suzanne/Sue
Sebastopol, CA (Zone 9a)
Sunset Zone 15
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Calif_Sue
Sep 27, 2016 6:27 PM CST

Plants Admin

Can you provide photos of your own plants rather than these from members here and other online images?

Let us know what plants you have, what you use for potting soil, how long ago were they planted, all the details needed to help figure out what is going on.
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[Last edited by Calif_Sue - Sep 27, 2016 6:29 PM (+)]
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RaySmile
Sep 28, 2016 4:39 PM CST
Hello Calif_Sue
About a week a go I realize that my houseplants leaves are not fresh and their nice green elephant-ear leaves changing the color to yellowish.
3 days ago by a little advise from a friend I took 3 CENTIMETER OF Height soil OF all Plant pots, mix it with Animal fertilizer and Spreading the mixed soil and AF in each plant pot. and from yesterday I saw my elephant-ear houseplant leaves severely wilted
What should I do now? should I take out all the mix soil ! or I should do something else, I really confused Thank You! Confused Thumbs down
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Name: Kevin Langley
London UK
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AmberLeaf
Sep 28, 2016 6:01 PM CST
Too much animal fertilizer could increase the problem by burning the roots of your house plants, what compost are you using? How much light are your plants getting and whats the environment like where you have them?
[Last edited by AmberLeaf - Sep 28, 2016 6:01 PM (+)]
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RaySmile
Sep 29, 2016 1:30 AM CST
AmberLeaf said:Too much animal fertilizer could increase the problem by burning the roots of your house plants, what compost are you using? How much light are your plants getting and whats the environment like where you have them?

ANSWER:
1- I used 1/3 animal fertilizer (Sheep manure) and 2/3 soil just 3 centimeter spreading in the plant pot
2- Plants pot are inside hall and getting indirect light through the hall gate (Glass)
3- the temp inside the hall around 20 degree Celsius

RaySmile
Sep 29, 2016 4:33 AM CST
If we use Too much animal fertilizer that could increase the problem of burning the roots.
Is there any way to eliminate the root burn? for ex. using anything to Neutralize the effect of fertilizer
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
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sallyg
Sep 29, 2016 8:12 AM CST
Really hard to give meaningful advice without seeing YOUR plants.
But when you say decrease the amount of water during the week, it sounds like they're kept too wet. That can kill roots. Then the plant has not enough roots to support the leaves. If this is what happened, the roots it does have would be nearer the surface, where you may have put too much fertilizer.
All speculation.
If you really want to know what the roots are doing, take one out of the pot and see. Are there well attached healthy roots all the way through the pot Or few roots, and a soggy mess at the bottom?
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
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dyzzypyxxy
Sep 29, 2016 10:16 AM CST
Ray, I'd like to add that if your plant is indeed a type of Elephant Ear - which can be a common name for Alocasia, Colocasia, Caladium and several other plants - most of them do have a dormant period at some point during the year. This is why they're generally used as feature plants outdoors in the summertime up north, and are taken in and let to go dormant in winter.

Animal manure is not generally used for indoor plants, because of the smell mainly but also because it's unknown how fast and how much the nutrients in it are released. You're much better off to choose a packaged, timed-release fertilizer. If your sheep manure released into the soil too quickly, all that urea in it could certainly burn the leaves of your plant.

If your plants are, indeed getting ready to go dormant, well you can't fight Mother Nature. We really REALLY do need to see pictures of your own plants to advise you better on this. We can then know exactly what type of "elephant ears" you have.

Also need to know your geographical location, please, so fill in your personal profile if you would. Air quality, humidity, how much light there will be through the winter, how cold does it get in your house at night, all are factors in growing plants indoors through the winter months.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

RaySmile
Sep 29, 2016 11:43 AM CST
dyzzypyxxy said:Ray, I'd like to add that if your plant is indeed a type of Elephant Ear - which can be a common name for Alocasia, Colocasia, Caladium and several other plants - most of them do have a dormant period at some point during the year. This is why they're generally used as feature plants outdoors in the summertime up north, and are taken in and let to go dormant in winter.

Animal manure is not generally used for indoor plants, because of the smell mainly but also because it's unknown how fast and how much the nutrients in it are released. You're much better off to choose a packaged, timed-release fertilizer. If your sheep manure released into the soil too quickly, all that urea in it could certainly burn the leaves of your plant.

If your plants are, indeed getting ready to go dormant, well you can't fight Mother Nature. We really REALLY do need to see pictures of your own plants to advise you better on this. We can then know exactly what type of "elephant ears" you have.

Also need to know your geographical location, please, so fill in your personal profile if you would. Air quality, humidity, how much light there will be through the winter, how cold does it get in your house at night, all are factors in growing plants indoors through the winter months.

Hello Elaine
I don't think my plants are getting ready to go dormant,
I live in Montreal Canada and the Montreal has a semi-continental climate, with a warm, humid summer and a very cold winter now is mostly sunny 18 degree Celsius .
But the plants are indoor and all the plant pot getting indirect sunlight trough the main hall gate
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Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Sep 29, 2016 12:56 PM CST
Ah ha, now we can see what you're dealing with - that burning on the edges of the leaves looks like fertilizer burn to me. So lesson learned on the sheep manure? Keep it outside, don't use it on houseplants! Even outside, it can burn plants if you use too much at once. Amend the soil with it, and let it sit for a couple of weeks before you plant.

On the E Ears, a really good flush with lots of water will help to get rid of the residual salts from the manure that are now left in the soil. They love water anyway, I've grown them IN my fish pond before. Then I'd wait a couple of weeks to see how your plants respond. If they begin putting up new leaves, use a commercial soluble fertilizer (you dissolve it into a watering can and apply it that way) at half strength. Your new leaves should come out nice and green without burned edges and tips.

If you don't see new growth within a month or so, either they're slowing down for winter or there is root damage that's going to take longer to recover from. Wait, water generously and don't fertilize at all until you see new leaves coming along.

Welcome to a fellow Canadian - I am transplanted here from Vancouver BC via Salt Lake City.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Kevin Langley
London UK
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AmberLeaf
Sep 29, 2016 1:06 PM CST
You could also gently remove the plants from the pots and remove as much of the fertilizer from the plant and gently hose the roots, clean the pots out as well then place the plant back into its pot with some new soil then give them a good watering afterwards. Place them next to a window preferably a large window where they can get plenty of light.
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Mid-Atlantic Composter Region: Maryland Birds
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sallyg
Sep 30, 2016 5:45 AM CST
I grow some elephant ears types outside here and bring them in for winter. Some just don't go fully dormant, even though I have them in a dim basement and withhold water. So these could recover somewhat, even indoors.
True that these probably resist root rot much more than the usual potted plant. Good point.
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)

RaySmile
Sep 30, 2016 12:04 PM CST
Hello friends(Elaine, Kevin Langley, Sally and Suzanne)Thanks all of you
I really appreciate for all your efforts, I learned from you and began to follow your instructions
but I would like to ask you? since now you are familiar with the nature of my indoor houseplants.
to move forward, would you please tell me in general, What should I do? and What should I don't? I tip my hat to you. I tip my hat to you. I tip my hat to you. I tip my hat to you. I tip my hat to you. I tip my hat to you. I tip my hat to you. I tip my hat to you. I tip my hat to you. I tip my hat to you. I tip my hat to you.
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[Last edited by RaySmile - Sep 30, 2016 12:41 PM (+)]
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Name: Suzanne/Sue
Sebastopol, CA (Zone 9a)
Sunset Zone 15
Region: California Plant Database Moderator Roses Irises Clematis Garden Photography
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Calif_Sue
Sep 30, 2016 2:52 PM CST

Plants Admin

Uh, what are the hats for? Confused
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Name: Kevin Langley
London UK
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AmberLeaf
Sep 30, 2016 3:39 PM CST
We are all friends on here I'd like to believe, I'd like to take my hat off to you but I don't wear a hat lol. Getting back on to the subject of plants, I'm no expert in plants but I have also learned a lot from the many good people on here. I was speaking with my friend today who had there Lemon tree die after he had giving it citrus feed a while ago and I've also had similar experiences in the past with plants going down hill once they have had either fertilizer or general plant feed. I've learned from my experiences so I always just leave plants to there devices and I only use natural things like compost or dead leafs from trees to line plant pots with. Oak leafs I've found are a good way off feeding a plant, however all plants are very different that require different kinds of feed. Most indoor plants don't need such feeding. One thing that I've always wondered is how much watering should various plants get as there are sometimes issues with over watering or under watering.
[Last edited by AmberLeaf - Sep 30, 2016 4:30 PM (+)]
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RaySmile
Sep 30, 2016 4:01 PM CST
Calif_Sue said:Uh, what are the hats for? Confused


Dear Suzanne
These hats are gifts for your efforts and I said at the beginning of this chat that anyone might help me at least eliminate the wilt I tip my hat to you.
Name: Kevin Langley
London UK
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AmberLeaf
Sep 30, 2016 4:36 PM CST
Oak leafs contain lots of natural goodness, sometimes dead Oak leafs can grow little orange mushrooms
Name: Suzanne/Sue
Sebastopol, CA (Zone 9a)
Sunset Zone 15
Region: California Plant Database Moderator Roses Irises Clematis Garden Photography
Cottage Gardener Keeper of Poultry Hummingbirder Bee Lover Butterflies Birds
Image
Calif_Sue
Sep 30, 2016 6:23 PM CST

Plants Admin

Perhaps remove the last hat. Glare

We have a hat tip emoticon here. I tip my hat to you.
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