Ask a Question forum: Hibiscus care

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Edsbiscus
Sep 29, 2016 8:23 PM CST
Hello,

We have Hibiscus plants along our front walk way and they been in the ground for 2 years but during the winter we have a few days when in dips down into the low 30's. Last year we bought plankets, they are just some green material that are suppose to work as blankets but they don't. Our plants did suffer from these plankets because water , and dew goes right through them and it freezes up. What is the best way to protect these plants without pulling them out of the ground? Thank you.
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Sep 29, 2016 11:03 PM CST
Welcome!

Where are these plants located?






Edsbiscus
Oct 14, 2016 2:08 PM CST
These plants are in Clayton, California 94517
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Oct 14, 2016 3:05 PM CST
A Tropical Hibiscus can not take temperatures below freezing. You are on the lower edge of where they will survive so winter is going to be a challenge. Although your Hibiscus are suffering some frost damage, the Frost Blanket may be what's keeping them alive. The blankets are meant to be put over the plants in the fall and removed in the spring so water needs to go through them.

Don't prune your Hibiscus in the fall. Those of us in cold country don't prune until AFTER things leaf out. There is always going to be some dieback on the more sensitive plants. If we prune in the fall or winter, the dieback is from where we pruned. If we wait, the dieback is what we would have pruned off if we had done it in the fall. Smiling
Name: Alda yarbrough
Tx. (Zone 8a)
Through God, all things are possib
cillay
Oct 15, 2016 9:47 AM CST
Hi all, I have a bright red hibiscus and was told it was a king something and dose not make seeds. Can I move this plant now or wait for spring. It did not grow in this spot and I cannot get a cutting to root. Please help. Alda zone 8A
cillay
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Oct 15, 2016 10:53 AM CST
Hibiscus are notoriously hard to root from cuttings but it does work. Try putting a drop of Hydrogen Peroxide in the water, keep the water clean and add a drop of Hydrogen Peroxide everytime you change the water.

Luckily, they are very easy to transplant. Early spring or fall are the best times. Remember that they do best in full sun with lots of water.
Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Tip Photographer Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Hibiscus
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Horntoad
Oct 15, 2016 11:52 AM CST
DaisyI said:Hibiscus are notoriously hard to root from cuttings but it does work.

Really? I've rooted at least eight different species and several cultivars with little problem, but I root in various materials, sand, vermiculite or seed starting mix not water.

wildflowersoftexas.com
texasnatureonline.com


Name: Karen
NM , AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Region: Arizona Greenhouse Cactus and Succulents Adeniums Garden Art
Plumerias Hibiscus Houseplants Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Dog Lover Cat Lover
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plantmanager
Oct 15, 2016 11:54 AM CST
I've had a hard time getting hibiscus to root in water, but they have all rooted quickly when placed in either potting soil or perlite.
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Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Tip Photographer Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Hibiscus
Image
Horntoad
Oct 15, 2016 12:23 PM CST
@Edsbiscus I agree with Daisy about that blanket. Although your plants may be getting some frost damage, the blanket is still protecting your plants. When the blanket gets wet and freezes, it actually provide an extra layer of insulation from the cold wind. Tropicals will survive temps below freezing if it is not to much below and is short term, but they will take some frost damage, covered or not. Keep covering with the blanket on nights when temps are expected near freezing and uncover during the day for sunshine. Prune back the damage when all danger of frost is over.
wildflowersoftexas.com
texasnatureonline.com


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