Ask a Question forum: Bouquet... What can I root, propagate????

Views: 154, Replies: 8 » Jump to the end
Name: Pamela Gregory
Maryland (Zone 6b)
Gardening A Perfect antidepressant
Image
PamelaLynn77
Oct 2, 2016 11:34 AM CST
Someone with enough patience please tell me what I can propagate from this bouquet? I'll do every piece if possible. I know it's asking for alot of someone's time. I'd be very grateful and I can research how to propagated myself if that helps at all.... I choose this just for propagating, I had the idea because my mother in law's roses arnt doing well and I wanted to root them my daughter's isn't very good either. So I did just a little search and I know it possible to do this .. I know its alot of work but Im currently unemployed and it's depressing and Im turning my frown upside down and who knows maybe you all can make me smart enough to make money by spring time. Lol. I do greatly appreciate it very much!!

Thumb of 2016-10-02/PamelaLynn77/2f9aea


Thumb of 2016-10-02/PamelaLynn77/b32e44


Thumb of 2016-10-02/PamelaLynn77/b8e69a

Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
Oct 2, 2016 2:33 PM CST
Pamela, if you could separate the stems for us, and take another picture we'll have a better idea. Each stem in a separate glass would be best, for viewing what you've got.

Off the top of my head, I'd have to say only stems that have healthy looking leaves on them are likely to put out roots for you. I see roses, Gerbera daisies and lilies. The daisies and lilies most likely will not root - daisies won't have any leaves, and the lilies grow from a bulb. The lily stem might make a bulb for you if you cut off all the flowers right away (but that would be painful, I know) The roses, I'm not sure on - I've had stems root by sticking them in the ground in spring. But never in fall.

Don't forget we're heading into winter right now so things that normally bloom in summer where you are (most of those flowers) will be going to sleep now. For your indoor plants to go through winter, concentrate on tropicals that grow all year round.

May I add, your money for that bouquet might have been better spent on some plants from the Clearance rack at your local Lowe's or Home Depot. (but you wouldn't get the pretty flowers that way of course). Or how about buying a packet of seeds? Start them under your lights, baby them through the winter and you'll have some nice big plants to set out and bloom early next spring. Please consult us on what to try this with though. Again some things will work and some not so well.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
[Last edited by dyzzypyxxy - Oct 2, 2016 2:36 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1288699 (2)
Name: Pamela Gregory
Maryland (Zone 6b)
Gardening A Perfect antidepressant
Image
PamelaLynn77
Oct 2, 2016 4:22 PM CST
How about this one?
Thumb of 2016-10-02/PamelaLynn77/0416cc

Name: Pamela Gregory
Maryland (Zone 6b)
Gardening A Perfect antidepressant
Image
PamelaLynn77
Oct 2, 2016 4:23 PM CST
thanks a million! Im gonna set aside a few id really like to propagate and Ill take pictures of those and post. i noticed a few as i took apart the bouquet that i couldnt do much with.
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
Oct 2, 2016 4:53 PM CST
It's possible that will root if you remove all the flowers (cut them off with 3 or 4 inches of stem and put them in a little cup?). Then take the stem, cut the bottom end off about an inch or so, and stick it in some damp Potting soil. Keep it in good light, but not direct sun, and keep it moist.

If the leaves stay green and perky, it's happy. If they don't, it's probably the wrong time of year to do this. View this as an experiment or a "learning experience" because it's hit or miss at the best of times.

What you will get if this stem roots is what is known as an "own root" rose. Most hybrid roses are grafted onto a more robust root stock so they can be bigger, and more disease resistant, but some own root roses can be wonderful. Keep some pictures of the flowers as they open, too because they might help to figure out the name of that rose.

Keep in mind what I mentioned earlier - for the price of a bouquet of cut flowers that will most likely all die in a week, you can buy a bare-root rose bush guaranteed to bloom beautifully next summer. The bare-root roses go on sale in March or April in most places.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Pamela Gregory
Maryland (Zone 6b)
Gardening A Perfect antidepressant
Image
PamelaLynn77
Oct 4, 2016 12:52 AM CST
dyzzypyxxy thanks so much for all your help. i love your quote! good stuff.. thanks a million chick!!!!
Name: Pamela Gregory
Maryland (Zone 6b)
Gardening A Perfect antidepressant
Image
PamelaLynn77
Oct 6, 2016 9:16 AM CST
I took more pics. If anyone can help me with name with names
of these flowers, plants id be very grateful!!
Thumb of 2016-10-06/PamelaLynn77/cfecd8


Thumb of 2016-10-06/PamelaLynn77/5b881b





Thumb of 2016-10-06/PamelaLynn77/569256


Thumb of 2016-10-06/PamelaLynn77/ef9a82

im going to take single pics now of the ones id like to propagate if possible????


[Last edited by PamelaLynn77 - Oct 6, 2016 9:19 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1292050 (7)
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
Oct 6, 2016 9:47 AM CST
Hi again Pamela. You have a hydrangea there that might root, but you do need to take off the flower head, so the stem will put its energy into making roots. That is the greenish white, large flower head.

The pink fluffy ones are Stocks, I think. They're a remote possibility for rooting, I'd say. Again you must remove all flowers and buds and don't be disappointed. They are easy to start from seeds in the spring.

The pink lily-like flowers are Alstromeria. They grow from tubers so most likely will not make roots for you.

Not sure what the greens are, very pretty, and if you were to strip off the lower leaves on those and put them into some potting soil there's a chance for rooting there.

The small peachy flowers are already dead, I think. Is the stem green or dark brown? In any case since there don't seem to be leaves I'd pitch that.

Wanted to say something important to you about your whole new venture into gardening. After reading so many of your posts about rooting things etc. the one thing you will absolutely learn as you become a gardener is patience. Some of these things will make roots fairly quickly, and some will take a month or maybe two - or not root at all before rot sets in. You need to be patient, give them time, and don't give up if it's not happening yet. It will. If not now, then in spring. You can't hurry plants.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Pamela Gregory
Maryland (Zone 6b)
Gardening A Perfect antidepressant
Image
PamelaLynn77
Oct 6, 2016 11:10 AM CST
Very nice! Ty dyzzy, ty I need a little time to process all of this.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by Paul2032 and is called "French Marigold"