Plant ID forum: Wildflower/weed ID please?

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upat5
Oct 8, 2016 4:01 PM CST
Hello.

Found this in Appalachian mtns, Northern VA. Woodland edge, scrubby area so could be non-native... Opposite leaf arrangement, single flower on stalk attached at leaf axil, so 1 flower per pair of leaves, 5 petal segments....looks as if 2 rays are "fused" together for each of these 5 segments (hard to see in pic because it was wet), yellow center. Leaves and stem pubescent and plant low to ground but most likely grazed by deer so who knows what actual height should be. Flowering now...not sure when it started.
Thanks for any ideas!

Thumb of 2016-10-08/upat5/85d40f


Thumb of 2016-10-08/upat5/cf0f24


upat5
Oct 8, 2016 7:38 PM CST
Anyone? Does it look maybe chickweed-y? Or Euphorbic? Any suggestions would be appreciated!
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Oct 9, 2016 6:38 AM CST
Galinsoga, maybe this one:

Name: Myriam
Ghent, Belgium (Zone 8a)
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bonitin
Oct 15, 2016 2:53 AM CST
I agree
Definitely a Calinsoga, native to North and South America and naturalized in Europe among others.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galinsoga
It is likely Galinsoga quadriradiata, but there is no certainty as there are other species that could be look-a- likes, and hardly any photo material on the web of those other species to compare with..I suppose they must be more rare..
What do you think @upat5 ?
Took these detailed photos today of a plant growing on the pathway at my front door..the plant is a bit wet from the rain.




upat5
Oct 16, 2016 7:49 PM CST
Hi Myriam and thanks so much for the photos! That's definitely it! I was fascinated by the fact that there was a line of these all the way up my rocky, gravelly driveway and they were (unlike Sympiotrichums and Solidagos) seemingly untouched by the deer or resident woodchuck! I transplanted some and have been watching them closely....there are flies and bees all over the neighbouring asters and goldenrod but NOTHING comes near these soldiers! Have you seen anything eat or take nectar from them?!
Name: Myriam
Ghent, Belgium (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Ferns Native Plants and Wildflowers Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Organic Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Frogs and Toads Plant Identifier
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bonitin
Oct 17, 2016 1:54 AM CST
I tip my hat to you. . The plant is an annual so will die off in the winter, but will reseed itself enthusiastically if you let it.
To answer your question, no i don't recall I having seen any insects on it, but sure there must be, or it wouldn't be so successful in its reproduction. maybe its visitors are so tiny that they easily escape the attention. I don't have it in my mainly shady and enclosed town garden, but I meet it often on rocky and sandy wastelands and along side paths in town.

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