Lilies forum: Kusha Maya

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Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Oct 12, 2016 6:24 AM CST
Well, at least there's one Kushi Maya growing well in the Midwest. It's living in an abandoned compost pile under total neglect, except for an occasion toss of triple 10 fertilizer in the Spring and Fall if there's enough left in the bottom of the bucket when I'm done feeding my good stuff.

Before I start, I must say a lot of people have trouble growing Kushi Maya, myself included. Since this one example grew so well and others were reporting problems, I decided to go out and buy 6 more, 3 each from two different sources which were planted in two different gardens. They don't look good at all. In fact, they are struggling just to hold their own.

I bought a single bulb in 2012. I didn't have a spot for it and didn't know how to grow it, so it got put back in a small cardboard box it came in and covered with soil. From there it went to the back of the lily fridge and was forgotten. The following year came and it had grown a squirrely stem about 15 inches long and I decided I better do something. The bulb had shriveled to the size of a dried up prune, but it had grown several small offsets which got my interest. I decided the old compost pile might be a good place, plenty of afternoon high canopy shade and soil high in organic matter with good drainage. I dug a trench there and carefully planted bulb and stem horizontally, leaving only a couple inches of the stem exposed. The end turned green and went skyward that first summer. As these pictures show it's been living in neglect ever since. It appears that the mother bulb did not survive. I did a thorough cleanup of it's living space last week.

First two photos taken late August, 3016
Thumb of 2016-10-12/Roosterlorn/255ca0


Thumb of 2016-10-12/Roosterlorn/121f56


Thumb of 2016-10-12/Roosterlorn/91d93f

Dug and replanted early Oct. 2016
Thumb of 2016-10-12/Roosterlorn/6737df


Thumb of 2016-10-12/Roosterlorn/8c446e


Thumb of 2016-10-12/Roosterlorn/f9c272





Thumb of 2016-10-12/Roosterlorn/c070d0

Name: Tracey
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Tomato Heads Pollen collector Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Cat Lover
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Photography Seed Starter Region: Wisconsin
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magnolialover
Oct 12, 2016 6:50 AM CST

Moderator

I often wondered if I cared too much about that particular cultivar when I got it and perhaps that's why I failed. Hilarious! Added a ton of non animal source compost mixed in native soil, raised bed, afternoon shade....and it shrunk to the size of an acorn, from larger than the size of a walnut. Maybe it was your residual triple 10, Lorn.
Tracey
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Oct 12, 2016 7:18 AM CST
Tracey, there's something about that compost pile that holds the key. I know its wetter and damper there and cooler, too. Lots of leaf compost and chunks of old sod, etc. I'll try and get a pH. But, my gosh, the ones I bought last year won't grow with the rest of my Orientals and OT's or anything in a regular garden. Maybe it likes a more natural environment with all the weeds and grass as company.
Name: Dave
Southern wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Region: Wisconsin Lilies Dog Lover Garden Photography Daylilies
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Nhra_20
Oct 12, 2016 7:35 AM CST
How about the temperatures inside the compost pile? As you know the compost gives off some heat and gas as it goes through its cycle
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Oct 12, 2016 11:58 AM CST
Dave, that pile has long since matured out and can best be described as remnants of a compost pile. Smiling
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Oct 12, 2016 2:52 PM CST
My best Kushi Maya lilies grow in close contact with other perennials. When the buds are half grown, you can't see where the stems emerge from the ground; there is too much foliage from other plants. And shade! These grow 5ft from the north side of my garage. And even when the sun overhead is to the north in early summer, they only get dappled sun through tree branches.
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
Image
Roosterlorn
Oct 12, 2016 3:00 PM CST
Tracey, I've added two pictures of mine to the data base for easy comparison. It almost appears as though we're dealing with two different clone varietals when you compare yours and Joe's to mine and Mike's. Your petals are narrower and more pointed with less curl at the tips where our petals are wider and fuller. The mid rib on yours is strong and pronounced even to a farrow on the face of the sepals that yours is and all but absent on ours. When you compare reverses for color, note that yours retains a lot of the species green whereas mine is cordovan. The long and short of this is that Yours and Joe's resemble the species a lot more than mike's and mine. Ours look more Oriental Any thoughts and comments. Smiling
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
Image
Roosterlorn
Oct 12, 2016 3:11 PM CST
Rick, which one would you say best resembles yours, Tracey's or mine?
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Oct 12, 2016 4:00 PM CST
Roosterlorn said:Rick, which one would you say best resembles yours, Tracey's or mine?


Yes. Hilarious! ..........But I'm serious!

The blooms can vary from year to year and place to place in the garden.

Thumb of 2016-10-12/Leftwood/86b72f Thumb of 2016-10-12/Leftwood/fded80

But not as much as Lilium papilliferum. These are the same clone:

Thumb of 2016-10-12/Leftwood/1f676e Thumb of 2016-10-12/Leftwood/b1001d

Thumb of 2016-10-12/Leftwood/2e3440 Thumb of 2016-10-12/Leftwood/f19883

Name: Tracey
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Tomato Heads Pollen collector Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Cat Lover
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Photography Seed Starter Region: Wisconsin
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magnolialover
Oct 12, 2016 5:34 PM CST

Moderator

Thinking mine might be closer to the species makes me feel like less of failure. My came that very first year it was offered, Faraway Flowers through Hyde UK. I have killed a l. napalense. So the thought of me killing its offspring is no surprise Hilarious!

Some things you just chalk up to not meant to be. I have always thought that species was really special, the color, the form, even the leaves... Thinking it was bred with something else, that still had the look of it, but maybe added hardiness and potential for garden worthiness, had to try it.

Maybe they are different clones from the same cross. Or maybe they are the same. I'm never confident with this sort of thing, as Lefty mentioned there are so many variables. But Lorn's theory makes me feel better about myself, so I'll stick with that. Thumbs up
Tracey
Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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pardalinum
Oct 12, 2016 5:53 PM CST

Moderator

Remember when Lankon came out and there were many that looked quite different, especially with respect to the extent of speckles? Was there ever a definitive answer to whether it was simply a very variable clone or different clones? Anyone know?

Lily (Lilium 'Lankon')
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Oct 12, 2016 7:05 PM CST
Well I now can say with verity that one is drifting in my garden. I started with 3 bulbs that all flowered the sameshade. Now this year, one is decidedly darker, while the others remain the same. They all grow right next to each other, so I think I can rule out cultural conditions.

Last year - all the same
Thumb of 2016-10-13/Leftwood/890653

This year one stem is....
Thumb of 2016-10-13/Leftwood/a6539a

Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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pardalinum
Oct 12, 2016 8:17 PM CST

Moderator

Well.... perhaps it has traveling genes then...
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Oct 12, 2016 9:34 PM CST
Rick, if there is some way you could tag that plant, and the see what it looks like next year. I'll bet it returns more like the average. Lankon grows hardily here also, but no dark flowers yet.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
Image
Leftwood
Oct 13, 2016 8:49 AM CST
Already thought of that, but somehow my tag got lost. Shrug!

I'm pretty sure I have pics of the whole group again this year, so it might help....

edited to say:
Perhaps I shouldn't have jumped the gun and said "with verity". In fact that was why I hadn't posted about it earlier when the flower opened - I still want to see what happens in the future.

[Last edited by Leftwood - Oct 13, 2016 9:22 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1297041 (15)
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
Image
Roosterlorn
Nov 14, 2016 8:25 PM CST
Richard Hyde recently announced that they have two new hybrids from Kushi Maya. They are sterile triploids (Kushi Maya X Unnamed Oriental Trumpet). The approved names are 'Yin' and 'Yang' and are somewhat shorter in height than Kushi Maya. Yin has very large flowers and is more upfacing than Yang. Smiling

Yin
Thumb of 2016-11-15/Roosterlorn/f05794

Yang
Thumb of 2016-11-15/Roosterlorn/e2f198

[Last edited by Roosterlorn - Nov 15, 2016 6:46 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1318597 (16)
Name: Tracey
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Tomato Heads Pollen collector Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Cat Lover
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Photography Seed Starter Region: Wisconsin
Image
magnolialover
Nov 14, 2016 8:58 PM CST

Moderator

Wonder if they bred the persnicketiness out of it? Green Grin!
Tracey

Protoavis
Nov 14, 2016 11:26 PM CST
I'm just wondering if they have retained the night fragrance or if it's just straight up oriental on the fragrance front.
Name: Dave
Southern wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Region: Wisconsin Lilies Dog Lover Garden Photography Daylilies
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Nhra_20
Nov 15, 2016 5:58 AM CST
Lorn, I thought it was an unnamed OT it was crossed with. I definitely like 'Yang' better.
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
Image
Roosterlorn
Nov 15, 2016 6:44 AM CST
OOPS--you're right, an 'unnamed OT'. Thanks for the correction. Smiling

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