Southwest Gardening forum: Lime tree transplant?

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Name: Alma
Phoenix & Cottonwood, AZ
USDA zone 9b, Sunset 13 & ??
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tomatofreak
Nov 14, 2011 11:30 PM CST
Has anyone had any experience moving a mature lime (or any citrus) tree? I planted this tree as a tiny thing many years ago, not realizing it would be in shade almost all the time. For years it sat there, never growing, until I moved it to a sunny spot. It took off and has produced like crazy for the past few years. Unfortunately, I've again mis-placed it. Is it possible to trim it back in the dead of winter, dig it up and move it once more?
Alma
In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. – Thomas Jefferson
Name: Susie
Phoenix AZ (Zone 9a)
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Aguane
Nov 15, 2011 12:10 PM CST
How big, tall is it, Alma? I mean is it physically possible for you to do this keeping the roots in tact?

What kind of lime is it? Off hand I'd say you could lose a growing season but that it's "possible" to move it. Not sure I'd trim it back. If you go through with this I think I'd be sure to use a lot of new shrub and tree soil and vitamin B to stimulate root growth.

FYI my Key Lime was very badly affected by the hail storm Oct 5 2010. It usually produces in summer. Depending on when your tree produces I think I'd attempt transplant when it finished it's fruit and prior to new flower sets.
“Don't give up too quickly"... unknown, I heard it somewhere.
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Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
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Dutchlady1
Nov 15, 2011 12:17 PM CST
Don't prune more than one third, is the generally accepted advice.
I lost a lovely well-producing Key Lime tree after two years of extra cold winters here Crying
Name: Alma
Phoenix & Cottonwood, AZ
USDA zone 9b, Sunset 13 & ??
Image
tomatofreak
Nov 17, 2011 11:11 AM CST
This was supposed to be a Bearrs lime, but it seems to be a Key instead. It always produces at this time of year and is currently loaded with ripe and ripening limes. It's probably 10' - 12' tall with a similar 'wing span'. I would never attempt to prune or move this tree myself; I'd hire someone with experience. It is thornier than any tree I've ever had and it would take a brave soul to even prune it. Mind you, I'm not sure it can be done at all, but I'd like to move it just the same. Will keep you posted. Was hoping someone had actually done something like this. Maybe it would be simpler to change the tree's environment. Shrug!
Alma
In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. – Thomas Jefferson
Name: Susie
Phoenix AZ (Zone 9a)
Southwest Gardening~ moderator/ATP.
Charter ATP Member Tip Photographer Forum moderator Region: Southwest Gardening Garden Ideas: Level 2 Roses
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Aguane
Nov 17, 2011 11:27 AM CST
I had my tree trimmer guy trim my AZ Sweet and Key Lime (damage from the hail).... they did a really great job. Don't know if they transplant.
“Don't give up too quickly"... unknown, I heard it somewhere.
~ All Things Plants, SOUTHWEST GARDENING ~Cubits.org ENERGY & POWER

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