Lilies forum: Acceptable bulb size when buying?

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Name: Julia
Upstate NY (Zone 6a)
Clematis Daylilies Irises Region: New York Hummingbirder Seed Starter
Vegetable Grower I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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JuliaNY
Mar 8, 2012 12:29 PM CST
I was trying to determine what the "acceptable" size bulbs should be when purchasing?
I saw an ad which stated the bulbs were 14/16 cm. Is that considered a large, medium or small? *Blush*
Julia
Upstate NY
Zone 6
Name: Brian
Ontario Canada (Zone 5b)
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bearsearch
Mar 8, 2012 1:10 PM CST
What kind of lily were they advertising? Some lilies produce small bulbs naturally and others will grow quite large.
Name: Julia
Upstate NY (Zone 6a)
Clematis Daylilies Irises Region: New York Hummingbirder Seed Starter
Vegetable Grower I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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JuliaNY
Mar 8, 2012 5:12 PM CST
Oriental Lily
Julia
Upstate NY
Zone 6
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Mar 8, 2012 9:02 PM CST
14 to 16 cm is acceptable size and its generally the standard number retailers use. Bulbs will be at least that size or larger even tho they list them as 14 to 16 cm. Trumpet lily bulbs, by nature are larger and you might see them listed as 18/20 or 20+ cm. To me, the quality of the bulb is more important than size--how solid and tight the scales are, how heavy, how fresh, etc.
Name: Julia
Upstate NY (Zone 6a)
Clematis Daylilies Irises Region: New York Hummingbirder Seed Starter
Vegetable Grower I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Image
JuliaNY
Mar 9, 2012 6:32 AM CST
Thanks for the information. I should have thought of this previously to compare bulbs I am getting this spring.
When you state "heavy", what does that refer to? More weight means a more solid bulb? Confused Like firmness?
Julia
Upstate NY
Zone 6
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Mar 9, 2012 10:20 AM CST
Yep. They're not dried out or dehydrated; they're fresh, make sure theyre not rubbery and they do not have loose scales.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Mar 9, 2012 4:33 PM CST
Tightness of the bulb scales may not be a good indicator for all species bulbs, but it can be true for all hybrid and species asiatics, trumpets and orientals. "Tightness" as I see it, is how solid the bulb is. A bulb that is like a solid ball, with now air spaces between scales, is the epitome of "tight".

IMO, more important is Lorn's mention of bulb firmness (in its individual parts, not necessarily as a whole). This hold true for any lily bulb. Some species bulbs (and their hybrids) are naturally loose growing, but a good quality, fresh bulb will always be firm and turgid.

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