Roses forum: What is bugging Belinda Dream?

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Name: Anna
North Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Texas Clematis Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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canadanna
Apr 11, 2012 7:16 AM CST
Why is Belinda's Dream looking so yucky? Any suggestions? I would prefer the most environmental friendly remedy.
Thumb of 2012-04-11/canadanna/b740f3
Name: Toni
Denver Metro (Zone 5a)
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.
Charter ATP Member Irises Salvias Xeriscape Birds I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Procrastinator The WITWIT Badge Region: Colorado Enjoys or suffers cold winters Cat Lover
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Skiekitty
Apr 11, 2012 8:43 AM CST
Steve suggested to me when mine looked crappy that it might be Thrips. http://diggingri.wordpress.com/2010/05/21/rose-thrip-alert-2... I'm not too environmentally friendly as I use MiracleGro fertilizer & GreenLight Rose spray for bugs. :)
Roses are one of my passions! Just opened, my Etsy shop (to fund my rose hobby)! http://www.etsy.com/shop/TweetsnTreats
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
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Steve812
Apr 11, 2012 9:33 AM CST
There are lots of ideas out there for controlling thrips. Probably the simplest is to put a teaspoon of Dawn or other dishwashing detergent in a spray bottle, then painstakingly spray all the blossoms in the garden and parts of the plants near them. Not 100% confident this would kill them all, but it should help a lot. You might also prune off all the infected blossoms and discard them far from your roses, they will never quite please, and doing so could carry away thrips that weren't reached by this treatment.

Lady beetles I am told eat thrips, but in my experience by the time there are enough lady beetles in the garden, thrips have done there damage and gone.

Neem oil works, too, but I understand that it kills bees and other beneficial insects. My guess is that any horticultural oil would work. Or even vegetable oil. You could also dust each rose bud with rotenone as it forms, but this would be painstaking work, I suppose.I would guess that soapy water might be as least as effective and a little easier to work with.
Name: Anna
North Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Texas Clematis Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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canadanna
Apr 11, 2012 5:58 PM CST
Thankyou for all the suggestions. Will definitely start with cutting off the flowers and using dishsoap.
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
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Steve812
Apr 12, 2012 10:36 AM CST
OOPS. I forgot the part about adding water to the dishsoap.

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