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The Horticultural Classification of Lilies
Posted on Feb 15, 2016 10:32 PM

From my journal Feb, 2005

Division 1
Hybrids derived from such species or hybrid groups as:

L. 'amabile, L. bulbiferum, L. cernuum, L. concolor, L. davidii, L. lancifolium, L. leichtlinii, L. pumilum, L. x maculatum, L. x hollandicum

......................or (newer source)..............................

also callosum, dauricum, lankongense, wilsonii, excluding x maculatum and x hollandicum

Division 1 (a)
Upright-facing flowers, single, one or several in an umbel or raceme (often compressed)

'Enchantment', 'Apollo', 'Prominence', 'Yellow Blaze'

Division 1 (b)
Outward-facing flowers

'Fire King', King Pete', 'Corsage'

Division 1 (c)
Downward-facing flowers

Citronella, 'Pegasus', 'Barbara North'


Division 2
Hybrids of Martagon type with parentage most from L. martagon form and/or L. hansonii

'Marhan', Backhouse Hybrids, 'Sutton Court'

......................................or .....................................

...from the following species and their varieties:

L. hansonii, martagon, medeoloides, tsingtauense



Division 3
Hybrids derived from L. candidum, L. chalcedonicum, L. monadelphum and other European species (not martagon types)

x testaceum, 'Limerick', 'Uprising'



Division 4
Hybrids of American species

'Shuksan', 'Robin', Bellingham Hybrids

.........................or...................................

.........mostly originating from from the western American species L. bolanderi, L. humboldtii, L. kellogii, L. pardalinum and L. parryi


Division 5
Hybrids derived from L. longiflorum and L. formosanum (most all L. longiflorum x Asiatic Hybrids) LA's

'Casa Rosa'

...............................................or....................................

(Ed McRae's book says L. longiflorum and Asiatic Hybrids(Div. 1). He explains the uses of L. formosanum. His information makes more sense but not sure they went through with this proposal. Most catalogues put LA's in Div 8

Division 5 (a)
.....or

Upright-facing flowers


Division 5 (b)
......or

Outward-facing flowers

Division 5 (c)
(no entry)
.....or

Pendent or downward-facing flowers



Division 6
Hybrid trumpet lilies and Aurelian hybrids derived from Asiatic species such as L. henryi, but not those from L. auratum, speciosum, japonicum and rubellum

................................................. or ........................................

Hybrids derived from the following Chinese species with purple bulbs: L. leucanthum, L. regale, L. sargentiae, L. sulphureum, L. henryi

Division 6 (a)
Those with trumpet-shaped flowers--------'Black Dragon', Pink Perfection', Damson'

......... or ..........

Upright-facing flowers


Division 6 (b)
Those with bowl-shaped flowers-----'Heart's Desire', 'First Love', 'Lady Anne'

......... or ..........

(Outward-facing flowers)


Division 6 (c)
Those with flat flowers------'Bright Star', 'Golden Sunburst', 'White Henryi'

........or .......

Downward-facing flowers


Division 6 (d)
Distinctly recurved flowers

'Lady Bowes Lyon'

........or.........
(no entry)



Division 7
Hybrids of Far-Eastern species such as:

L. auratum, japonicum, rubellum, speciosum, including any of these hybrids with L. henryi

...........................................or...................................................

.....the following species and their varieties:

L. alexandrae, auratum, japonicum, noblissimum, rubellum, speciosum

Division 7 (a)
Those with trumpet-shaped flowers-----'Angelo', 'Joy', 'Mr. Sam'

...............or..................

Upward-facing flowers


Division 7 (b)
Those with bowl-shaped flowers-----'Casa Blanca', Devon Dawn', Trance'

..................or.....................

Outward-facing flowers


Division 7 (c)
Those with flat flowers----'Star Gazer', 'Pink Beauty', 'Imperial Crimson'

....................or......................

Downward-facing flowers


Division 7 (d)
Those with recurving flowers-------'Sans Souci', Journey's End', 'Black Beauty'

..........or

(no entry)


Division 8
Hybrids not provided for in any other division

...........................or.........................

Orienpet Hybrids

derived from the crossing of species and hybrids from Division 6 and Division 7(yes)


8 (a) Upward-facing flowers
8 (b) Outward-facing flowers
8 (c) Downward-facing flowers



Division 9
All species, their varieties and forms

.................or................

All true species and their botanical varieties



Division 10
or...

Miscellaneous hybrids - all not covered in the above divisions
.......................................................................................................-

Sometimes a lily will be described using something like 1 c/d, which would be a combination of old and new - Asiatic with pendent or down facing recurved flowers. The first letter referring to the way the flower faces and the second referring to the shape of the flower.

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Lily classifications
Posted on Feb 15, 2016 8:18 PM

Mar 5, 2007
Lily classifications

Asiatic Hybrids – Horticultural Division 1

The asiatic hybrids are among the earliest to bloom, and also the easiest of lilies to grow! You can plant these lilies almost anywhere…especially in brightest sunshine with lots of gay garden plants for company. They have the broadest color range of any division, including whites, pinks, plums, yellows, oranges, and reds. Their flowers can be upfacing, outfacing, or pendant, and generally are not scented.
Technically speaking, Division 1 lilies are hybrids derived from such species as L. tigrinum, L. cernuum, L. davidii, L. maximowiczii, L.x macultum, L. x hollandicum, L amabile, L. pumilum, L. concolor, and L. bulbiferum.


Martagon Hybrids – Horticultural Division 2

Along with the earliest of the asiatics, blooms another entirely different group called the martagons, or martagons hansonii hybrids. These are tall lilies with many little down-facing flowers and whorled leaves. Martagons appreciate some shade, and are quite decorative in the woodland garden. Though it might take them a year to adjust to a new garden, once established, the martagons will thrive for years. Yellow, white, pink, lavender, light orange, deep dark red are the colors most often seen, often with whimsical freckles and spots.

Division 2 lilies include hybrids derived from such species as L Martagon, L hansonii, L medeoloides, and L tsingtauense.


Candidum Hybrids – Horticultural Division 3

Division 3 includes hybrids derived from such as L candidum, L chalcedonicum, L monadelphum, and other related European species, but excluding L Martagon.This division includes very few entries, and they are not easily found in commerce.


American Hybrids – Horticultural Division 4

There are many native lilies in North America…and the western species have been used to create some very beautiful and graceful lilies. The bulbs are unique…made up of little jointed scales, and the blooms like bouncy bright balloons on swinging curved pedicels. Division 4 lilies can be challenging outside of the western United States and Canada, but their unique beauty certainly makes them worth trying. With growing conditions that suit them, which includes a cool light soil and dappled shade, they can rapidly make impressive clumps.

Division 4 includes hybrids derived from North American species, such as L pardalinum, L humboldtii, L kelloggii, and L parryii.


Longiflorum Hybrids – Horticultural Division 5

This division includes hybrids derived from L longiflorum and L formosanum. These hybrids are generally elegant white trumpets, easily raised from seed, but not particularly hardy in the garden.


Trumpet and Aurelian Hybrids – Horticultural Division 6

To some people, no lily is a real lily unless it is a trumpet! Who can deny that a trumpet lily is like no other plant in the garden…tall, stately, serene and magnificent…with huge waxy flowers full of fragrance? And colors…not only pure glistening white, but bright gold, yellow, chartreuse, pink, plum, and apricot are available…some with backs of brown or purple or iridescent green!

Aurelians are hybrids that include Lilium henryi in their ancestry. L. henryi is a rugged species that has tightly recurved orange or yellow flowers, giving the aurelians a wide range of flower shapes and colors.

Trumpets and aurelians bloom in mid to late season, and their huge flower heads may require staking. They may also require a mulch in cold winter areas, and some protection from late spring frosts… but these little services are amply repaid by the long season of spectacular, fragrant bloom.

Division 6 includes hybrids derived from L luecanthum, L regale, L sargentiae, L sulphureum, and L henryi.


Oriental Hybrids – Horticultural Division 7

Lilies of this exotic group are not among the easiest to grow, particularly in hot summer areas. But you will try them…we know! Often called “Stargazers “, these lilies have huge flowers with wonderful fragrance… in shades of white, pink, salmon, and crimson. Give them partial shade, plenty of water, humus rich soil that is slightly acid, and mulch for a cool root run.

Division 7 includes hybrids derived from L auratum, L speciosum, L nobilissimum, L rubellum, L alexandrae, and L japonicum.


Miscellaneous Hybrids – Horticultural Division 8

Division 8 includes hybrids that are not provided for in any previous division, including crosses between divisions. “Orienpets”, hybrids between Division 7 (oriental) and Division 6 (trumpet & aurelian) lilies are a prominent example, and you will surely want to include them in your garden. They combine the beautiful flower shape and color of the orientals …with the ruggedness and dependability of trumpets and aurelians. They are much better suited to hot summer areas than the orientals, and …more resistant to winter cold.


Species – Horticultural Division 9

Species lilies are wild lilies. Native lilies occur in North America, Europe, and especially Asia…Japan, China, Burma, & India. It is from these wild lilies that breeders have created their magnificent hybrids for our gardens. Species lilies oftentimes possess a delicate charm that appeals to many people, and many of the species make fine garden plants…while others are a real challenge to grow.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Initial Comments:
Lily classification

The Seventeenth Supplement to the International Lily Register (published in 1999) introduced a system of dual subdivisions for every newly registered lily. Prior to this publication, subdivisions had only been used in some of the horticultural divisions into which the genus has been split and the characters involved varied with the division created.

Now, both flower habit ((a) up-, (b) out- or (c) down-facing) and flower form ((a) trumpet, (b) bowl, (c) flat or (d) recurved) are indicated for each entry when this information has been supplied by the registrant. The existing lettering is retained with flower habit given first, separated from flower form by a forward slash mark (/). Thus the entry for 1(b/c) 'Aloft' represents an Asiatic Lily (Division 1) with out-facing, flat-faced flowers.

At present, there is no intention to systematically revise all existing Register entries to include a dual subdivision but when the relevant information is available, it will be added to the record.

It is not a requirement that dual submission be used at all times. The way in which the information is presented means that, where for a particular purpose it is necessary, one or both can be ignored. Their inclusion, however, together with the division number, helps to present, in an abbreviated form, a quick 'picture' of the flower concerned. For a full account of any plant, it is necessary to refer to the description.

http://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/r...

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Bright Star, Lady Alice and White Henryi

VI (d) Bright Star clone

Parentage: Selection from Aurelian Hybrids
Hybridizer: R:&N: J.deGraaff. OBF cat. 1959.
Description: Ivory white outside, apricot orange star inside; petal tips recurved. Stems 1.0-1.5m. July. C*1966.
Photo Available Photo Available

Comments
On 6 September 2006 Calvin Helsley wrote:
The original 'Bright Star' is a clone. Bulbs currently available are a seed grown strain of very similar lilies.


VI (/d) Lady Alice clone

Parentage: Unknown
Hybridizer: R & N : De Jong Lelies, c.1971 REG: IRA, 1998.
Description: Apricot orange, tips fading to white; outside pale apricot with yellowish ribs; spots scarce, small, cinnamon; papillae present in throat; nectaries green. Fls turk's-cap-shaped; petals 90 x 34mm, strongly recurved. Lvs 125 x 20mm, glossy green. Stems 1.1m, dotted dark violet brown. July.

VI (d) White Henryi clone

Parentage: L. henryi x L. leucanthum var centifolium
Hybridizer: R:&N: L.Woodriff, c.1945.
Description: White, deep orange throat, red speckling of minute papillae. Fls scented; petals with reflexed tips. Stems 1.5m. July.


Lady Alice

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White henryi

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Houseplants
Posted on Feb 14, 2016 11:26 PM

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Clivia miniata, yellow
Posted on Feb 11, 2016 8:17 PM

grown from seed, tall stalk

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Gardens
Posted on Jan 4, 2016 2:04 PM

Saturday, January 1, 1999

For ease of describing and keeping track of areas, I have divided the gardens into four separate areas. Our home is situated in the north-west corner of our property.

There are several beds and borders around the house and greenhouse, and I refer to this area as the south yard.

Farthest south and still enclosed by a tree line are several large newer beds, referred to as the south gardens.

The shed is east and a bit south of the house, on the other side of the drive/parking area.

The north side of the shed is referred to as the north lawn, all the way past the screen room at the end of the shed and to the pool deck by the garden. Starting at the Parking area, walking east, you would go through bed 13, past 14, and 25, with the garden and box beds to your left. If you keep going, you cross the drainage ditch and head off to the field/meadow to the river ridge.

South of the shed is referred to as the east lawn/yard. If you walk along that side of the shed, you pass beds 19 and 20 to your left and meet up with beds 15 and 18. Taking the path between 15 and the pool deck, you get to 16 and 17 and the garden.

Turning right the path takes you to the box beds and across the east lawn to compost bins and bed 25. Beyond this area is trees and meadow to the south and east.

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