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to prune or not to prune- white lilac, persian lilac

to prune or not to prune- white lilac, persian lilac
Posted by panba from Michigan from 48104 on 2004-05-11 11:08:37

Hi again,
After the lilac bloom is over, is it ok to prune and how should I prune? I see lots of spindly gowth in the middle of the bush. Also are all lilac trees created equal? in terms of taking care of them?
Thanks again.
Panba
  • Pruning Lilacs
    Posted by Lyn from MI 6a on 2004-05-16 00:06:30

    Quoting panba from Michigan: ------------
    -Hi again,
    After the lilac bloom is over, is it ok to prune and how should I prune? I see lots of spindly gowth in the middle of the bush. Also are all lilac trees created equal? in terms of taking care of them?
    -Thanks again.
    -Panba

    --Panba:
    If your lilacs are of the French variety and more than 2 years old I would recommend removing lilac flowers to the first set of leaves as soon as the color fades away. The reason being as long as the flower remains, the plant will send nutrients to keep it going. When the flower is removed that energy is directed to producing blooms for the following year.

    Lilacs can be prone to powdery mildew. Although this doesn't harm the shrub it is unsightly. A preventative is to open the center of the plant to light and air by pruning out suckers growing from under the soil and a third of the older canes. Leave only the strongest of the new green canes. Again more energy will be directed to the development of next years blooms.
    • thanks
      Posted by panba from Mi48104 on 2004-05-16 09:43:00

      Thanks, this is a great help!
      I do have French, Korean ( Miss Kim) and the regular Lilacs. Actually these are 7-8 years old. I used to prune willy-nilly but now I think i will do a better job.
      Panba


      Quoting Lyn: ------------

      -Quoting panba from Michigan: ------------
      -Hi again,
      After the lilac bloom is over, is it ok to prune and how should I prune? I see lots of spindly gowth in the middle of the bush. Also are all lilac trees created equal? in terms of taking care of them?
      -Thanks again.
      -Panba

      --Panba:
      If your lilacs are of the French variety and more than 2 years old I would recommend removing lilac flowers to the first set of leaves as soon as the color fades away. The reason being as long as the flower remains, the plant will send nutrients to keep it going. When the flower is removed that energy is directed to producing blooms for the following year.

      Lilacs can be prone to powdery mildew. Although this doesn't harm the shrub it is unsightly. A preventative is to open the center of the plant to light and air by pruning out suckers growing from under the soil and a third of the older canes. Leave only the strongest of the new green canes. Again more energy will be directed to the development of next years blooms.
  • Lilac pruning
    Posted by Kimm from 4a/5b-MI on 2004-05-14 06:40:22

    There is really two types of pruning of Lilacs, deadheading or removing this years spent blossoms, and the major pruning maost shrubs often need for shape and health.
    Deadheading should be done shortly after the blossoms fade since the shrub is going to be setting the buds for next years blossoms shortly after that. Looking at many Lilacs that grow wild and get no care ever this is not something that needs to be done to improve blossoming that some think.
    The major pruning can be done any time. Prune out old, dead, diseased, or borer infested canes, branches, stems as soon as noticed for better overall health. If you are planning on opening the center of the shrub this can be done any time since it is total removal of the canes and they will not be producing blossoms next year at all.

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