Tomato plants - Knowledgebase Question

Lihue, Ha
Question by bobby6
June 30, 2010
Is it normal for some tomato plants like heirloom or other large type of tomatoes to only produce two tomatoes or none at all even though the plants are large and heathy looking. I had the same results with my red bell pepper plant too.


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Answer from NGA
June 30, 2010

0

Your plants should be more rewarding than that! Tomato and pepper pollen isn't viable much over 90 degrees, so fruits won't set. What have your temperatures been? Another possibility is that the flowers aren't being pollinated at all because tomatoes are often ?self-pollinating.? Try gently tapping and shaking your plants in the early morning to see if you can get some fruit to set.

If your plants are full of lush foliage but no flowers, it could be that they received too much nitrogen fertilizer. Here?s some basic info on fertilizer and nutrients that plants require. The 3 numbers on a fertilizer bag refer to the percentage of N (nitrogen), P (phosphorus), and K (potassium) in the bag. There are different formulations for different purposes. In general terms, nitrogen produces lush green growth, phosphorus helps strengthen stems and produce flowers, and potassium keeps the root system healthy. If you're applying fertilizer to fruiting (e.g., tomatoes) or flowering plants, you're not as interested in the plant developing leaves as you are in it flowers and fruit, so you'd use a formulation lower in nitrogen and higher in phosphorus, such as 15-30-15.

Organic sources of nutrients:

Nitrogen: alfalfa meal, blood meal, coffee grounds, cottonseed meal, fish emulsion, seabird guano.
Phosphorus: bone meal, rock phosphate
Potassium: greensand, seaweed, kelp

Hope this info helps!

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