Flowering Pear - Knowledgebase Question

depew, Ne
Question by car1380
June 30, 2010
Tree is planted having Southern Exposure. It did
bloom this year but it also has lost a large chunck of its' bark. The soft inner wood is exposed. What is happening and Why? Tree was planted over 10 years ago to replace a Kwanzan Cherry which contracted boarer.


Image
Answer from NGA
June 30, 2010

0

Not sure if this is the problem based on your description but it may be Sunscald. Sunscald usually occurs on the southern side of a tree's trunk, and can happen in summer and winter. The sun actually dries out and burns the bark, which splits and falls off. On sunny winter days, the quick plunge from warm sun into a cold night can cause the bark to split open. You can avoid these problems by painting young tree trunks with whitewash or white interior latex paint, or wrapping them with tree wrap paper (available at most garden centers). Keep trunks protected for at least two years. Check to make sure the paper stays loose as the tree grows. If the flowering Pear is a Bradford you may have an included bark problem as well, The reason and cause for some of the soft inner wood being exposed is because of the branching characteristics of this tree. Too many branches protrude from one location, causing an attractive lolli-pop shape but the tree has problems with its bark, conflicting stems, and can easily be damaged in a wind storm at the juncture / weak point. I recommend pruning off some of the conflicting branches to help the tree. This area should heal itself eventually. Keep in mind the Aristocrat Pear is a good alternative to a Bradford for the branching structure. Hope this helps and good luck!

You must be signed in before you can post questions or answers. Click here to join!

« Return to the Garden Knowledgebase Homepage

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by sunnyvalley and is called "Aster and Sedum"