Rose Cuttings - Knowledgebase Question

Trenton, NJ
Question by MelveniaBro
March 25, 1999
I have heard to successfuly propagate roses, one can take a stem cutting below the five leaves and place into a root stem solution and put into non-soil mixture. Do this really work? If not how can one successfully perform propagation?

What is the cost and how does one obtain membership in NGA?


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Answer from NGA
March 25, 1999

0

the growing tip is above ground. To encourage rooting, wound the bottom side of the branch slightly where it touches the soil, cover it with a few inches of soil, weight it down with a rock and top with a generous layer of mulch. Water it occasionally during the growing season. Eventually, the branch will develop enough roots from the wounded area to support itself enough to separated from the parent plant.

If the rose is a shrub rose growing on its own roots, you may be able to simply dig up and remove a sucker, or rooted shoot, from near the base of the plant. This would be an easier method of propagating it.

Finally, roses can also be grown from seed, but unless you are growing a species rose there is no garantee that seed will be viable or that the resulting plant will resemble the parent.

To join NGA, please visit the web site at www.garden.org -- by taking advantage of our special trial offer, you will automatically become a member/subscriber of the organization.

the growing tip is above ground. To encourage rooting, wound the bottom side of the branch slightly where it touches the soil, cover it with a few inches of soil, weight it down with a rock and top with a generous layer of mulch. Water it occasionally during the growing season. Eventually, the branch will develop enough roots from the wounded area to support itself enough to separated from the parent plant.

If the rose is a shrub rose growing on its own roots, you may be able to simply dig up and remove a sucker, or rooted shoot, from near the base of the plant. This would be an easier method of propagating it.

Finally, roses can also be grown from seed, but unless you are growing a species rose there is no garantee that seed will be viable or that the resulting plant will resemble the parent.

To join NGA, please visit the web site at www.garden.org -- by taking advantage of our special trial offer, you will automatically become a member/subscriber of the organization.

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