Growing Onions - Knowledgebase Question

Name: Frank Moran
Chico, CA
Question by naromf
March 26, 2000
I started my onions from seed last September and planted them the first week in November. They are growing well, but are starting to bolt. I've been cutting back the flower. I have 2 questions:
1) Last year, even though I cut off the flower stem, the large hollow stalk kept growing. How do I prevent this?
2) When do you suggest I stop watering the onions? When they start to yellow and I bend over the stalks, or just before harvest?


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Answer from NGA
March 26, 2000

0

10 to 12 hours of daylight. A general rule of them is that "long-day" onions do better in northern states (north of 36th parallel) while "short-day" onions do better in states south of that line.

Onions are fully mature when their tops have fallen over. After pulling from the ground allow the onion to dry, clip the roots and cut the tops back to one inch. The key to preserving onions and to prevent bruising is to keep them cool, dry and separated. As a general rule, the sweeter the onion, the higher the water content, and therefore the less shelf life. A more pungent onion will store longer so eat the sweet varieties first and save the more pungent onions for storage.

The closer to harvest the more water the onion will require, but, once the tops yellow, you can stop watering.

10 to 12 hours of daylight. A general rule of them is that "long-day" onions do better in northern states (north of 36th parallel) while "short-day" onions do better in states south of that line.

Onions are fully mature when their tops have fallen over. After pulling from the ground allow the onion to dry, clip the roots and cut the tops back to one inch. The key to preserving onions and to prevent bruising is to keep them cool, dry and separated. As a general rule, the sweeter the onion, the higher the water content, and therefore the less shelf life. A more pungent onion will store longer so eat the sweet varieties first and save the more pungent onions for storage.

The closer to harvest the more water the onion will require, but, once the tops yellow, you can stop watering.

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