My jalapeno is in shock? - Knowledgebase Question

Name: Bri
California (Zone 10a)
Question by PepperNHerb
September 4, 2017
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A few days ago I was told that I need to move my plants so that they don't get ruined when we remodeled our fence, so that night I moved my pepper plants out of the way. They were big, green, happy and starting to finally give me peppers. Unfortunately I had to move them from their spot with full sun, to a spot with full shade. Amazingly enough, my ghost pepper plant adjusted just fine, but the photo shows the result of my jalapeno plant. It dropped a bunch of it's leaves, wilted, and the leaves are shriveling up and turning brown. The fence is done and I want to put them back to where they were originally, but the weather here in SoCal has been in the 100s so I thought it best to wait. Problem is, from how it looks, I don't think just putting it back will save it. What can I do? I know this little plant is a fighter. It recovered from root rot and survived the extremely high heats from this summer... how can I help it?

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Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Image
A comment from dyzzypyxxy
September 4, 2017
No easy answer just yet, but a couple of questions for you - did you just dig the plant up and put it in that pot with the garden dirt around it? Was the plant thoroughly watered before you removed it? The pot looks a bit small for that size of plant. Garden dirt compacts rather easily, and can dry out to a brick-like consistency. From the look of your plant, I think I would try standing the whole pot in a bucket of lukewarm water for an hour or two. Then pull it out, and watch to see if the pot drains. If the plant doesn't perk up from this, OR if it doesn't drain well, pull it out of that pot and put it back where it was, with maybe something to shade it a bit until the weather moderates. A plant in full production like that has high demands for consistent water, fertilizer and sun. It surely had a severe shock, so that may be what's wrong. But as I said at the beginning, no easy answer here.

Name: Bri
California (Zone 10a)
A comment from PepperNHerb
September 4, 2017
The plant has always been potted and it was watered prior to moving.

Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Image
Answer from dyzzypyxxy
September 4, 2017

0

So the only change the plant has suffered is the move to the shady location? Then I would definitely, (but gradually) move it back towards where it was growing. It's starving to death for lack of sun.

I wouldn't fertilize it until it shows new growth and the leaves start to look more normal, either. An ailing or shocked plant can't make use of fertilizer and it might burn the leaves.

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