Preparing Tea Roses for Winter - Knowledgebase Question

Pineville, WV
Question by bdwright
October 1, 2000
Is there anything I should do to get my hybrid tea roses ready for winter?


Image
Answer from NGA
October 1, 2000

0

of warm weather. You should do what works best for you.

Next comes the actual protection. There are many fancy contraptions on the market that you can buy to wrap around your rose, but you can also use good old soil and mulch. Basically, just shovel some soil into a mound at the base of the plant--the soil should go up about 12" above the bud union (looks kind of like a knob or a knuckle, this is where the rose was grafted to the rootstock in the beginning of it's life). Then, cover the mound of soil with about 12" of mulch. I use cypress mulch but you could also use compost or straw. This volcano like structure you have made keeps the ground frozen, and strangely enough, that is exactly what you want. If the rose is subjected to freezing and thawing, damage is sure to result. Many people wrap this mound with chicken wire to keep it intact over the winter. I've never done this, but if it makes you feel more comfortable, or, if your rose is in a spot where there is a great deal of wind or animals may dig at it, you should probably add this step.

Good luck with your roses!

of warm weather. You should do what works best for you.

Next comes the actual protection. There are many fancy contraptions on the market that you can buy to wrap around your rose, but you can also use good old soil and mulch. Basically, just shovel some soil into a mound at the base of the plant--the soil should go up about 12" above the bud union (looks kind of like a knob or a knuckle, this is where the rose was grafted to the rootstock in the beginning of it's life). Then, cover the mound of soil with about 12" of mulch. I use cypress mulch but you could also use compost or straw. This volcano like structure you have made keeps the ground frozen, and strangely enough, that is exactly what you want. If the rose is subjected to freezing and thawing, damage is sure to result. Many people wrap this mound with chicken wire to keep it intact over the winter. I've never done this, but if it makes you feel more comfortable, or, if your rose is in a spot where there is a great deal of wind or animals may dig at it, you should probably add this step.

Good luck with your roses!

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