Yellow Leaves On Hibiscus in Low Desert - Knowledgebase Question

Scottsdale, AZ
Question by elyanepia
May 22, 2001
I have a beautiful white hibiscus, along with several purple hibiscus, one of them a biannual and several oleanders. They all tend to have yellow leaves, especially the white tropical. I have used ironite and recently started using your new product for azalea, camellia, rhododendron recommended by a nursery for the yellow leaves. It works fine for everything except the biannual and the white hibiscus. The tropical white has gotten worse. I love that shrub and would like to see it flourish. I live in Scottsdale, AZ; the plant is under a portico with a sw exposure. Perhaps I'm giving it too much water or not enough.


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Answer from NGA
May 22, 2001

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old leaves first. This excess salt accumulates in the leaf edges, where it kills the tissue and the leaf dries out and turns brown. It's important to water deeply, slowly and usually infrequently. At least once a month, water deeply enough to "leach" or push salts well below the root zone. Frequent, light "sprinklings" or short time spans with drip irrigation, allow salts to accumulate in the top layers of soil, where the roots are, which is bad news.

Similar symptoms occur when too much fertilizer has been applied. It's generally not advisable to fertilize landscape plants in our summer heat. Finally, although the nurseries sell them, hibiscus is not well-suited to the desert environment. It is usually a constant struggle to keep them healthy as they are poorly adapted to our conditions. old leaves first. This excess salt accumulates in the leaf edges, where it kills the tissue and the leaf dries out and turns brown. It's important to water deeply, slowly and usually infrequently. At least once a month, water deeply enough to "leach" or push salts well below the root zone. Frequent, light "sprinklings" or short time spans with drip irrigation, allow salts to accumulate in the top layers of soil, where the roots are, which is bad news.

Similar symptoms occur when too much fertilizer has been applied. It's generally not advisable to fertilize landscape plants in our summer heat. Finally, although the nurseries sell them, hibiscus is not well-suited to the desert environment. It is usually a constant struggle to keep them healthy as they are poorly adapted to our conditions.

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