Planting And Transplants - Knowledgebase Question

North Huntingdon, PA
Question by adzura
September 19, 2001
We just finished a major landscape project on an approximately 200 x 30 foot slope.

The design included specimans and common shurbs. Some trees, but mostly pines, shrubs and groundcovers were used.
The landscape company designed for soil, location, etc., so I feel the plant selection is correct.

The date we began planting was 9/15/01. As of today, 9/20/01, some of the pine needles are turning yellow and the leaves of the trees are drying.

This is a large project to keep up, but since the investment was large, we have dedicated the time to water and maintain the area.

I have planted a lot of items over a 20+ year span and have lost very few. I generally avoid fall planting and have never planted on a slope.

The plants were not fed as not to encourage growth.

We were simply told to water. What is too much or too little watering?

Should a transplant shock product be used?

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Some of the items are:
Japanese Black Pine
Weeping European Larch
Hornibrook Pine
Weeping Fountain Beech
Weeping White Pine
Weeping White Spruce
Vanderwolf Pines
Willows
Weeping Norway Spruce
Weeping Hemlock (low grower)
Everred Maple
Bloodgood Maple

If you need further information, I would be happy to provide it.

Arlene Dzura



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Answer from NGA
September 19, 2001

0

that could cause yellowing, such as a soil imbalance or use of hot mulch or accidental herbicide drift and so on. Since the job was just completed I would strongly suggest you consult with the lanscape designer, installer and nursery supplier as to what is happening. You might also wish to consult with your local county extension. There is just no substitute for an on-site evaluation when there is a widespread problem.

I hope this gives you some ideas for troubleshooting, but I really do urge you to find some local expert professional advice. that could cause yellowing, such as a soil imbalance or use of hot mulch or accidental herbicide drift and so on. Since the job was just completed I would strongly suggest you consult with the lanscape designer, installer and nursery supplier as to what is happening. You might also wish to consult with your local county extension. There is just no substitute for an on-site evaluation when there is a widespread problem.

I hope this gives you some ideas for troubleshooting, but I really do urge you to find some local expert professional advice.

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