Regulating Moisture And Naturalizing In Woodland Areas. - Knowledgebase Question

Louisville, KY
Question by sobrazen
January 15, 2002
planning 60,000sq.ft. area composed largely of woodland areas withvarying degrees of shade from light to deep. woodland stream,some open sunny sloped areas near house. The area around house is doing well. We plan to improve woodland area naturalizing ferns, hostas hemlock, kousa and wildflowers. concerned aabout moisture needs first season and long term.We're looking for an alternative to an irrigation system. Am I for drought tolerant varieties? Please tell me something other than"layer of mulch. Also-any yellow flowering Kousa? Louisville. I love your site. Louisville, Ky.


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Answer from NGA
January 15, 2002

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minimum will suffer just as the naturally growing woodland suffers. It is a sort of survival of the fittest at that point.

With kousa dogwoods, please keep in mind that this tree is not a one for one substitute for the understory tree the native dogwood. The kousa dogwood requires more sun than shade in order to thrive and bloom nicely.

I would suggest that you spend some time testing your soil and researching the growing conditions you have to offer, then working from there, determine which plants are likely to do well for you. You may find some clues by looking at the plants already growing there. A naturalist, your county extension, and knowledgeable nursery staff can all help you in deciding what to try. Over time, and with some experimentation, you will discover which plants do best for you -- and which watering methods work well for you.

Good luck with your project!
minimum will suffer just as the naturally growing woodland suffers. It is a sort of survival of the fittest at that point.

With kousa dogwoods, please keep in mind that this tree is not a one for one substitute for the understory tree the native dogwood. The kousa dogwood requires more sun than shade in order to thrive and bloom nicely.

I would suggest that you spend some time testing your soil and researching the growing conditions you have to offer, then working from there, determine which plants are likely to do well for you. You may find some clues by looking at the plants already growing there. A naturalist, your county extension, and knowledgeable nursery staff can all help you in deciding what to try. Over time, and with some experimentation, you will discover which plants do best for you -- and which watering methods work well for you.

Good luck with your project!

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