Wilt - Knowledgebase Question

New Oxford, PA
Question by veronica11
April 10, 2002
Last year I bought some Gerbera daisies. I planted them in full sun and watered regurly. They started turning brown and withering away. Even though I had about5 plants in 2 different beds they all died. I was told they probably died from wilt which is a bacteria. I don't want other plants in these beds to get this. How can I prevent this from spreading to other plants this year and what do I do to prevent any new Gerbera daisies I purchase from getting this?


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Answer from NGA
April 10, 2002

0

is less effective and uses more water in the long run. Use your fingers to check the soil moisture below the surface and water as needed to keep the soil evenly moist but not sopping wet.

In some cases an overly wet soil can encourage root diseases. Also, avoid wetting the foliage when you water as this can encourage foliar problems such as fungal infection. In the same vein, make sure your plants are located in their preferred type of light conditions and in a spot with good air circulation.

Finally, you may want to run some basic soil tests and see if the fertility levels and pH are adequate for healthy growth. Over and undersupply of nutrients can both affect plants' ability to fight off problems, so it pays to feed based on the test results. Your county extension should be able to help you with the tests and interpreting the results.

I hope you have better luck with your flowers this year. If however you see signs of the wilting you might want to consult right away with the county extension as to what exactly is causing the problem and what additional control measures you could take to combat it -- since it is impossible to recommend a specific control without a definite identification of the problem.


is less effective and uses more water in the long run. Use your fingers to check the soil moisture below the surface and water as needed to keep the soil evenly moist but not sopping wet.

In some cases an overly wet soil can encourage root diseases. Also, avoid wetting the foliage when you water as this can encourage foliar problems such as fungal infection. In the same vein, make sure your plants are located in their preferred type of light conditions and in a spot with good air circulation.

Finally, you may want to run some basic soil tests and see if the fertility levels and pH are adequate for healthy growth. Over and undersupply of nutrients can both affect plants' ability to fight off problems, so it pays to feed based on the test results. Your county extension should be able to help you with the tests and interpreting the results.

I hope you have better luck with your flowers this year. If however you see signs of the wilting you might want to consult right away with the county extension as to what exactly is causing the problem and what additional control measures you could take to combat it -- since it is impossible to recommend a specific control without a definite identification of the problem.


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