Intimate Companion To Clematis Lanuginosa - Knowledgebase Question

Downers Grove, IL
Question by AWolsky
July 13, 2002
(white Candida) clematis lanuginosa was just planted in a very large pot at the base of an arbor/trellis. During planting the main stem was snapped. I gather that the plant will survive and spout new shoots, next year. However, I want flowers this summer. Is there any plant other than lanuginosa (for example another clematis),, that I can put in the same pot as lanuginosa and expect both to thrive? I have been warned that they will entwine and that anything I put in must have the same pruning requirements as lanuginosa. (what are they?) Please advise.


Image
Answer from NGA
July 13, 2002

0

an assortment of annuals such as nasturtium, morning glory, cypress vine, moonflower, purple hyacinth bean, and so on. You could also plant some shorter continuously colorful annual flowers at the perimeter of the container to provide early season color while you are waiting for the vines to come into bloom.

Finally, pruning instructions for your Candida clematis. This vine will bloom on both old and new wood, so routine annual pruning can be done in one of two methods.

One method is to prune back just some of the stems to about two to four feet in early spring. This will stimulate new growth and bloom will occur on the new growth later in the season. Meanwhile, the remaining older stems will bloom earlier in the season. This method will prolong the flowering period for you but you will have fewer flowers at a time.

Alternatively, you can cut the whole thing back to about three feet in the spring and a more concentrated bloom flush will occur in mid summer.

Each spring you would also remove any winter damaged stems, cutting down to good wood. For new plants, the International Clematis Society recommends cutting all new clematis back quite short to a good set of buds the first spring to encourage sturdy long term growth. Routine pruning would begin the following year.

I hope this helps you work with your clematis and get the results you are hoping for. an assortment of annuals such as nasturtium, morning glory, cypress vine, moonflower, purple hyacinth bean, and so on. You could also plant some shorter continuously colorful annual flowers at the perimeter of the container to provide early season color while you are waiting for the vines to come into bloom.

Finally, pruning instructions for your Candida clematis. This vine will bloom on both old and new wood, so routine annual pruning can be done in one of two methods.

One method is to prune back just some of the stems to about two to four feet in early spring. This will stimulate new growth and bloom will occur on the new growth later in the season. Meanwhile, the remaining older stems will bloom earlier in the season. This method will prolong the flowering period for you but you will have fewer flowers at a time.

Alternatively, you can cut the whole thing back to about three feet in the spring and a more concentrated bloom flush will occur in mid summer.

Each spring you would also remove any winter damaged stems, cutting down to good wood. For new plants, the International Clematis Society recommends cutting all new clematis back quite short to a good set of buds the first spring to encourage sturdy long term growth. Routine pruning would begin the following year.

I hope this helps you work with your clematis and get the results you are hoping for.

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