Transplanting Thorndale Ivy - Knowledgebase Question

Weatherford, OK
Question by jbgragg
August 11, 2002
I have recently tried transplanting thorndale ivy without success. The area I am transplanting to is a sand playground but the soil underneath is good. The purpose of planting it is to keep the Oklahoma wind from blowing the sand into the kids eyes. We have a chain link fence that I would like the ivy to cover. I think I may have let the soil get too dry before but I would like a few pointers before I try again.


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Answer from NGA
August 11, 2002

0

stem. Next, water them deeply at planting time and then cover the soil with mulch several inches deep. Do not allow it to touch the stems, though. This will help keep the soil moist longer and also keep down weeds.

You will need to keep the soil evenly moist but not sopping wet while the plants become established. Dig down into the soil an inch or two and see if and when you need to water again. Check the potting mix and the surrounding soil as they may dry at different rates. When you water, water deeply, wait a few hours, then dig down and see how effective your watering really is. Sometimes it is surprising.

You will need to keep the soil moist up until it freezes in the late fall. If the ivy goes into winter on the dry side it will discolor badly and may defoliate, especially in a windy location.

It can take ivy a year or two to settle in and begin to grow. It sounds like you would like to have the wind break as soon as possible. Maybe you could attach inexpensive burlap to the fence in the meantime. It could provide a little bit of shade and windbreak for the ivy plants and the ivy can grow up it. Eventually the burlap will rot away, but the ivy should be able to stay on the fence.

Good luck with your project.

stem. Next, water them deeply at planting time and then cover the soil with mulch several inches deep. Do not allow it to touch the stems, though. This will help keep the soil moist longer and also keep down weeds.

You will need to keep the soil evenly moist but not sopping wet while the plants become established. Dig down into the soil an inch or two and see if and when you need to water again. Check the potting mix and the surrounding soil as they may dry at different rates. When you water, water deeply, wait a few hours, then dig down and see how effective your watering really is. Sometimes it is surprising.

You will need to keep the soil moist up until it freezes in the late fall. If the ivy goes into winter on the dry side it will discolor badly and may defoliate, especially in a windy location.

It can take ivy a year or two to settle in and begin to grow. It sounds like you would like to have the wind break as soon as possible. Maybe you could attach inexpensive burlap to the fence in the meantime. It could provide a little bit of shade and windbreak for the ivy plants and the ivy can grow up it. Eventually the burlap will rot away, but the ivy should be able to stay on the fence.

Good luck with your project.

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