Hydrangea Propagaion New Plants Do Not Grow Roots Use Take Root New Plants Rot - Knowledgebase Question

Name: Clark Becky
Salem, VA
Question by rebehm1
November 19, 2002
I have a problem with trying to propagate my Hydrangea plants. I use the method of stem cutting. Then I always use SCHULTZ Take Root to aid the plant in new root growth.
My plants always just rot in the planting pot. I have tried now for 2 years, and have had no luck. I do not know if this is a common problem, or if I am just not doing a simple something. I keep the plants soil moist, but never soggy. I have tried outdoors, indoors nothing seems to work.'

I read an article in Southern Living about a year ago about Hydrangea plants and how easy they are to propragate. I have followed their directions to the letter. I have researched and all the basic information is the same as to how to do it.

Thank you so much for your help.


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Answer from NGA
November 19, 2002

0

bag from touching the cuttings. (You can use a bent coat hanger in the pot or similar to prop it up and away.) Place the pot in a bright location but out of direct sun, direct sun will cause it to overheat. Now be patient. Open the bag occasionally to allow for air exchange. You should not need to water as the humidity inside the bag is pretty steady. Once it seems they are well rooted, roots should begin within a few weeks, gradually open and then remove the bag allowing them time to acclimate to the open air. Also move them gradually to brighter light or similar to their growing location.

Another alternative is to simply leave the cuttings outside on the north side of the house where it is bright but shaded from direct sun. The typical summer heat and humidity provide good rooting conditions so you do not need the plastic covering. Check periodically to make sure the soil is still moist, water if needed.

I hope this helps you trouble shoot. My first inclination is to guess they are too wet, or that the potting mix is not suited to cuttings and is causing you problems. Look for a soilless mix, without fertilizer in it if possible. Good luck with your cuttings! bag from touching the cuttings. (You can use a bent coat hanger in the pot or similar to prop it up and away.) Place the pot in a bright location but out of direct sun, direct sun will cause it to overheat. Now be patient. Open the bag occasionally to allow for air exchange. You should not need to water as the humidity inside the bag is pretty steady. Once it seems they are well rooted, roots should begin within a few weeks, gradually open and then remove the bag allowing them time to acclimate to the open air. Also move them gradually to brighter light or similar to their growing location.

Another alternative is to simply leave the cuttings outside on the north side of the house where it is bright but shaded from direct sun. The typical summer heat and humidity provide good rooting conditions so you do not need the plastic covering. Check periodically to make sure the soil is still moist, water if needed.

I hope this helps you trouble shoot. My first inclination is to guess they are too wet, or that the potting mix is not suited to cuttings and is causing you problems. Look for a soilless mix, without fertilizer in it if possible. Good luck with your cuttings!

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