Black Bugs On Roses - Knowledgebase Question

CA
Question by spalding6
April 25, 2004
My roses are just getting started and putting on new growth. Now I have noticed first aphids, and then little black bugs. The leaves are turning brown and looking as though they are burnt. The leaves crumble at the lightest touch. I put a homemade application of dawn soap, olive oil, and a bit of tabasco sauce diluted about 3 parts water and 1 part mixture. The mixture didn't deter the bugs. Thanks for your help - I need it. Nancy Spalding


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Answer from NGA
April 25, 2004

0

a problem in areas with sandy soils. They also only seem to be a problem in early summer. Control methods are similar to Japanese Beetles. Use powdered rotenone or pyrethrum-based insecticides to kill Chafers. Another method is to kill the chafer larvae using biological controls such as beneficial nematodes or a product called "milky spore." A new Neem-based product is available that repels the chafers. Or, manually knock them off your roses into a jar filled with water and kill them. Or trap them with a specially designed Rose Chafer trap that uses a pheremone to attract them.

Sawfly larvae: Sawfly larvae (or rose slugs) are a bit harder to control since they remain on the undersides of leaves where they are hard to reach with spray. Sawfly larvae are small (?-inch long) slug-looking critters that are easy to identify because they tend to wrap themselves in a tight circle.

For organic control, shake the plant and step on the pests as they fall on the ground (this can be either repulsive or very gratifying), or spray them with Bioneem? or insecticidal soap. Again, be sure to follow the instructions and precautions listed on the containers.

Another control method is provided by birds; specifically, wrens. Place wren houses around your rose garden and watch the birds do the work! Wrens are very tolerant of human activity and they relish sawfly larvae. Wrens can raise up to three clutches per summer; consequently, they never stop hunting for food. The birds may not provide 100 percent control, but they help tremendously, and add to the enjoyment of your garden through their wonderful songs.

a problem in areas with sandy soils. They also only seem to be a problem in early summer. Control methods are similar to Japanese Beetles. Use powdered rotenone or pyrethrum-based insecticides to kill Chafers. Another method is to kill the chafer larvae using biological controls such as beneficial nematodes or a product called "milky spore." A new Neem-based product is available that repels the chafers. Or, manually knock them off your roses into a jar filled with water and kill them. Or trap them with a specially designed Rose Chafer trap that uses a pheremone to attract them.

Sawfly larvae: Sawfly larvae (or rose slugs) are a bit harder to control since they remain on the undersides of leaves where they are hard to reach with spray. Sawfly larvae are small (?-inch long) slug-looking critters that are easy to identify because they tend to wrap themselves in a tight circle.

For organic control, shake the plant and step on the pests as they fall on the ground (this can be either repulsive or very gratifying), or spray them with Bioneem? or insecticidal soap. Again, be sure to follow the instructions and precautions listed on the containers.

Another control method is provided by birds; specifically, wrens. Place wren houses around your rose garden and watch the birds do the work! Wrens are very tolerant of human activity and they relish sawfly larvae. Wrens can raise up to three clutches per summer; consequently, they never stop hunting for food. The birds may not provide 100 percent control, but they help tremendously, and add to the enjoyment of your garden through their wonderful songs.

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