RELOCATING ENGLISH LAUREL - Knowledgebase Question

OLYMPIA, WA
Question by JHALL499
November 16, 2005
MY QUESTION IS REGUARDING RELOCATING ENGLISH LAUREL. THERE IS A HOMESTEAD AREA ABOUT 5 MILES FROM MY HOME THAT IS BEING CLEARED FOR DEVELOPMENT. THE HOUSE THAT ONCE STOOD THERE WAS SURROUNDED BY A HEDGE OF ENGISH LAUREL. THE HEDGE IS FAIRLY LARGE AND WEAVES THROUGH THE PROPERTY. I WAS WONDERING IF THIS HEDGE WOULD BE ABLE TO BE DUG UP (WITH EQUIPMENT) AND TRANSPLANTED TO A NEW LOCATION- MY HOUSE. I AM LOOKING FOR A HEDGE TO PLANT IN THE FRONT OF OUR YARD TO HELP SEPARATE THE HOUSE FROM THE ROAD. IS IT WORTH THE EFFORT TO TRY TO TRANSPLANT OR WOULD IT BE BETTER TO BUY FROM A NURSERY AND LET THE BEAUTIFUL HEDGE GO?


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Answer from NGA
November 16, 2005

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Salvaging plants can be quite rewarding, providing you have the equipment to properly dig and transport them to their new growing sites. You should expect some dieback due to stress and some transplant shock. Usually this kind of damage can be pruned away and the plants will recover. So, depending upon whether or not you have access to the equipment, salvaging might be worth the time and effort. On the other hand, once established, laurel hedges grow quite rapidly. New plants won't have the woody framework, but they will develop it over time. You might want to compare the prices of new plants and the cost of salvaging before making your final decision. In any event, best wishes with your laurel hedge!

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