Meyer Improved lemon - Knowledgebase Question

Westlake Village, CA
Question by propsys
May 27, 2006
For Mother's Day my wife wanted a small lemon tree to go in an Italian lemon pot that she wants to keep in front of a north west facing bay window.

I repotted it. It flowered but almost all the blossoms fell off even though I tried to cross pollinate with a Q tip.

How do we fertilize this, when, how much, when to prune, where to prune, to maintain a 18


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Answer from NGA
May 27, 2006

0

I think your new little tree is going through a little transplant shock and is trying to adjust to growing in your home. I suspect that it was growing under ideal conditions before you brought it home and it simply needs some time to adjust to the different light levels, temperatures and moisture it is now experiencing. Nothing a little more time won't cure.

As for the dropped blossoms, it's just part of the process. Citrus trees often produce many more blossoms than they can support, especially if they're going through a stressful situation. I suspect your tree will produce new blossoms in a few short months (Meyer lemons produce nearly all year 'round). You can help transfer pollen by gently brushing the insides of each open flower with a soft brush.

Citrus trees can be successfully grown indoors if you provide bright light (some direct sunshine is beneficial), ample moisture, and occasional feeding. I use a half-strength dilution of a liquid fertilizer (such as Peter's or Miracle-Gro) and feed every 2-3 weeks during the growing season. This method supplies a constant supply of needed minerals without the concern that I might over-feed and burn the roots.

You can prune as needed to keep the canopy in a ball. If you clip out overly long branches as they occur, you won't accidentally cut off the blossoms. Tip pruning in this fashion will force flower development to unpruned branches.

In 1908, Mr. Meyer imported the first Meyer Lemon tree from China, where it is grown as a dooryard tree. Unfortunately, the original Meyer specimen was prone to CTV (citrus tristeza virus), which didn't harm the lemon tree itself but which could spread to other citrus varieties.

Finally, in the 1950s, Don Dillon, Sr., a second generation member of the Four Winds Nursery family, discovered a virus-free clone. All Meyer Lemon trees propagated in California now derive from that "improved" mother tree.

Hope this answers all your questions. Glad like the Endless Summer Hydrangea!
In 1908, Mr. Meyer imported the first Meyer Lemon tree from China, where it is grown as a dooryard tree. Unfortunately, the original Meyer specimen was prone to CTV (citrus tristeza virus), which didn't harm the lemon tree itself but which could spread to other citrus varieties.

Finally, in the 1950s, Don Dillon, Sr., a second generation member of the Four Winds family, discovered a virus-free clone. All Meyer Lemon trees propagated in California now derive from that "improved" mother tree.

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