how & when to transplant wild black raspberries - Knowledgebase Question

Morrisville, VT
Question by hjohn52750
August 5, 1998
I would like to know the best time of the year to transplant black raspberries. There is an entire field of the in the sand pit across from my house, also what type of fertlizer shoukd be used.


Image
Answer from NGA
August 5, 1998

0

Black raspberries fruit on side branches, so you need to prune off the tops of the canes the year they appear to encourage branching. Ideally, in the first season, when the primocanes reach 18-24" tall, you should cut off the top 3-4". Late the next winter, before they start to grow, trim back the side branches to 8-12", which will stimulate even more fruiting side-branches! In the fall,after leaves have dropped from the canes, remove the floricanes by cutting them off at ground level (be careful not to scrape or jab the crown of the plant in the process, or you may damage next year's buds).

Since these wild canes weren't pruned late last winter, head them back now, before they begin to grow too much, and some side branches should grow. Start on the right foot with the new primocanes, and following year you should see a bumper-crop! My only other caution to you is that wild plants often harbor viral and fungal diseases, as opposed to stock you can buy through a nursery that is certified disease free, and often disease resistant. But the wild ones have such great flavor, and they're free! Black raspberries fruit on side branches, so you need to prune off the tops of the canes the year they appear to encourage branching. Ideally, in the first season, when the primocanes reach 18-24" tall, you should cut off the top 3-4". Late the next winter, before they start to grow, trim back the side branches to 8-12", which will stimulate even more fruiting side-branches! In the fall,after leaves have dropped from the canes, remove the floricanes by cutting them off at ground level (be careful not to scrape or jab the crown of the plant in the process, or you may damage next year's buds).

Since these wild canes weren't pruned late last winter, head them back now, before they begin to grow too much, and some side branches should grow. Start on the right foot with the new primocanes, and following year you should see a bumper-crop! My only other caution to you is that wild plants often harbor viral and fungal diseases, as opposed to stock you can buy through a nursery that is certified disease free, and often disease resistant. But the wild ones have such great flavor, and they're free!

You must be signed in before you can post questions or answers. Click here to join!

« Return to the Garden Knowledgebase Homepage

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by joannakat and is called "Two poppies (Icelandic and California)"