Wintering New Guinea Impatiens - Knowledgebase Question

Corning, NY
Question by wendyb6
November 6, 1998
Am looking for insight on caring for and keeping several large New Guinea Impatiens in three pots. I would specifically like to know what to do with the plants now that the winter season is upon us. Since these are tuberous plants, I'm not sure if I should cut them back or how to take care of them through the cold months to insure that I can enjoy them again next outdoor season.

Two pots stand about a foot high and the last is about half that size. I have 4 colors, red, salmon, pink and purple. The pink and purple have very red leaves and stems (if they are refered to as stems). Can you help!?

I tried to read your library of questions and answers but got an access error!


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Answer from NGA
November 6, 1998

0

high yet maintain air circulation by placing the pot in a plastic bag left open at the top or other similar method. Place in filtered light (not in direct sun). The plant will root fastest at warm room temperatures -- between 70 and 80 degrees.

Once the cuttings are rooted, gradually acclimate them to your growing conditions and move them into larger pots as needed. By next spring you should have some nice new plants.

New Guinea Impatiens are lovely plants with wonderful foliage and blooms. Based on your question I'm not certain you are actually asking about these plants because they are fibrous rooted rather than tuberous. If by any chance you meant tuberous begonias (also fabulous plants!), the instructions would be quite different. If so, please check the Q&A (I hope it works!) or ask again at the web site and we will do our best to help!

Good luck with your plants!


high yet maintain air circulation by placing the pot in a plastic bag left open at the top or other similar method. Place in filtered light (not in direct sun). The plant will root fastest at warm room temperatures -- between 70 and 80 degrees.

Once the cuttings are rooted, gradually acclimate them to your growing conditions and move them into larger pots as needed. By next spring you should have some nice new plants.

New Guinea Impatiens are lovely plants with wonderful foliage and blooms. Based on your question I'm not certain you are actually asking about these plants because they are fibrous rooted rather than tuberous. If by any chance you meant tuberous begonias (also fabulous plants!), the instructions would be quite different. If so, please check the Q&A (I hope it works!) or ask again at the web site and we will do our best to help!

Good luck with your plants!


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