Flooding area in the backyard - Knowledgebase Question

San Antonio, Te
Question by takikos
May 25, 2010
Hi I have an area that turns into a stream when it rains hard in my backyard. What can I do to make the area look attractive without blocking the water flow? I plan a xeriscape landscaping.

Answer from NGA
May 25, 2010


Have you considered lining the area with river rocks? If you dig a trench or depression you can direct the rainwater flow and then plant on the banks of the depression. I think it would look attractive and it would be functional. Some outstanding drought tolerant plants for south Texas include the following: Cosmos sulphureus (orange cosmos), Gaillardia pulchella (blanket flower), Gomphrena globosa (globe amaranth ), Leonotis nepetifolia (annual lion's) Phaseolus acutifolius (tepary bean), Portulaca grandiflora (moss rose), Zinnia elegans (zinnia) and Zinnia haageana (Mexican zinnia). Succulents include: Agave americana (agave ), Aloe saponaria (soap aloe), Aloe vera (medicinal aloe), Euphorbia tirucalli (pencil tree), Kalanchoe fedtschenkoi (South American air plant), Opuntia humifusa (hardy prickly pear), Stapelia spp. (carrion flower) and Tradescantia pallida (purple heart).

Some ornamental grasses to consider include: Festuca glauca (blue fescue), Imperata cylindrica (Japanese blood grass), Muhlenbergia capillaris (Gulf muhlygrass), Muhlenbergia lindheimeri (Lindheimer's muhlygrass), Nassella tenuissima (Mexican feather grass), Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), Pennisetum setaceum (African fountain grass), Schizachyrium scoparium (little bluestem), Sorghastrum nutans (indiangrass), Spartina bakeri (sand cordgrass), Uniola paniculata (sea oats).

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