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By lauribob on Apr 25, 2018 2:54 PM, concerning plant: Tamarack (Larix occidentalis)

In this part of our state, the forests are mainly made up of pine and tamarack, with a lesser amount of fir. I love the fall color of the tamarack. It really stands out against the green of the pines. The trees get very large and majestic, with giant trunks soaring up into the wild blue yonder. When they first get their needles in the spring, they are soft to the touch and a lovely shade of "spring green." I thought about planting a couple out in the pasture, but realized that when they are bare in the winter, they would just look dead. I'd rather have an evergreen, I think. They are the best firewood you can get around here; burns very hot and clean. (Almost too hot if not mixed with fir.)

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By lauribob on Apr 25, 2018 11:12 AM, concerning plant: China Aster (Callistephus chinensis 'Hulk')

I grew these from seed one year and thought they were very cool. The actual flower is a yellow disc of 1 - 2 inches. The green bracts that surround the flower appear to be green petals. They make great, long lasting cut flowers since the bracts don't fade away nearly as fast as a real petal would. They make a great accent in a mixed arrangement or are quite striking on their own. They prefer moist, rich soil.

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By lauribob on Apr 25, 2018 10:31 AM, concerning plant: Joyweed (Alternanthera brasiliana 'Purple Prince')

The striking burgundy color of the foliage will intensify in full sun. In part shade, it is still attractive, more of a purple/russet shade. This sun-lover was bred to stay compact for container use and smaller gardens.

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By frankrichards16 on Apr 25, 2018 10:19 AM, concerning plant: Peony (Paeonia lactiflora 'Ozark Beauty')

"Paeonia 'Ozark Beauty', (4-DB-PK) lactiflora cultivar Peony, (Wild Bros., 1950), USDA Hardiness Zone 3, Medium height, large double, shell pink petals, dark pink base, silver sheen, side-buds, Late bloomer, Michigan Bloom Month 5-6.

Large rose-type flowers. Needs support. Bred by Gilbert H. Wild & Son (Allen) from Sarcoxie, Missouri. They started hybridizing peonies in 1925 and introduced ~40 new cultivars. They also introduced & marketed peonies from other breeders. In 1991, the nursery (and peonies) was sold to Greg Jones & John Huitsong who continue to market bare root peonies."

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By frankrichards16 on Apr 25, 2018 7:16 AM, concerning plant: Intersectional Peony (Paeonia 'Old Rose Dandy')

"Paeonia 'Old Rose Dandy', (3-SL-R) Itoh/ intersectional Hybrid Peony, (Chris Laning, 1993), USDA Hardiness Zone 4, Medium height, single, Brick Red petals, dark red flares, yellow ring of stamens, white sheath, yellow stigmas, midseason bloomer , Michigan Bloom Month 5-6.

A lutea hybrid. P. lutea x purple double flower suffruticosa seedling. Dark green leaves. Flowers are an old rose color. Award of Merit 1993. Bloomed in second year after planting."

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By Australis on Apr 25, 2018 2:48 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Pepperpuss 'Lavendar Falls')

This is a well-known clone of the grex and thought to be a diploid. It has long-lived blooms, lasting up to 4 (sometimes 5) months when in good conditions. The spikes are arching to penduluous and typically carry up to 15 blooms.

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By ILPARW on Apr 24, 2018 8:11 PM, concerning plant: Callery Pear (Pyrus calleryana 'Aristocrat')

I planted two Aristocrat Callery Pear trees in a big parking lot island in northeast Illinois in 1989. They looked fine in that tough location. About 2005 the hospital completely redid that area and all is gone. This cultivar was more pyramidal with wider branch crotches, (and wavy leaf margins and thornless) than most, but still was susceptible like other cultivars of this species to storm breakage. In the South it often was hit hard by Fireblight Disease. 'Aristocrat' has mostly been discontinued by the nursery industry. I don't recommend Callery Pear as a good ornamental tree for regular yards and landscapes. The birds will eat the tiny brown pears and spread them into the wild where it becomes a horrible invasive plant with sharp branchlets.

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By ILPARW on Apr 24, 2018 7:51 PM, concerning plant: Flowering Pear (Pyrus calleryana 'Cleveland Select')

This cultivar of Callery Pear from China is one of the few cultivars left that are being propagated because it is not as likely to break from storms because of the weak, brittle wood. It has a more upright, tighter branching habit than most. I don't mind it as a parking lot island tree or some such tough, limited, urban site itself, but unfortunately the hungry birds will eat its tiny brown pears and seed it into the wild, where it becomes an invasive nuisance plant. It has nice white flowers, though they stink, but the Callery Pear does not make a good quality ornamental tree for a regular yard or landscape. I told my neighbors not to plant one from Home Depot because of those reasons and someday they will be sorry.

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By ILPARW on Apr 24, 2018 7:40 PM, concerning plant: Bradford Pear (Pyrus calleryana 'Bradford')

'Bradford' was the first great cultivar of this Callery Pear from China that was released in the 1970's. It had a broad and very rounded form. It bore very little of the tiny brown pears at first, until other cultivars were planted around also and there was cross-pollination. Callery Pear is a weak, brittle-wooded tree and the 'Bradford' cultivar was especially susceptible to a lot of storm breakage. I remember a few that broke right in two in northeast Illinois back in the 80's and 90's. The nursery industry discontinued it by 2000 because of its weakness. No great loss.

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By ILPARW on Apr 24, 2018 7:28 PM, concerning plant: Callery Pear (Pyrus calleryana)

If Callery Pear did not become so invasive into the wild in eastern North America, I would promote it for parking lot islands and similar tough urban situations. Outside of nice white flowers, it is not a beautiful tree to use in regular landscapes. It is brittle wooded and easily breaks in storms. When it goes wild into nature, it develops horrible sharp branchlets that really hurt and it is really getting aggressive in fields. The first great cultivar of 'Bradford' was a very broad, rounded form that I saw a good number of times break up from storms (I remember seeing one specimen in northeast Illinois breaking right in half), and it was discontinued by the nursery industry by 2000. A number of other cultivars were also discontinued for the same reason. A few more upright, tighter-growing cultivars, such as 'Cleveland Select' and 'Chanticleer,' are still being sold a lot because their breakage is not as severe. This species from China is not very useful for American native beneficial insects, and the fruit is not really good for native birds. I call this "the Chinese Rat Tree."

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By frankrichards16 on Apr 24, 2018 6:56 AM, concerning plant: Peony (Paeonia lactiflora 'Myrtle Gentry')

"Paeonia 'Myrtle Gentry', (4-DB-PK) lactiflora cultivar Peony, (Brand, 1925), USDA Hardiness Zone 4, Medium pink, large double, light pink petals, fades to white, strong stems, side-buds, fragrant, late bloomer, Michigan Bloom Month 5.

Rosy white, with tints of flesh and salmon. Flowers well above the foliage. Planted last fall.

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By frankrichards16 on Apr 24, 2018 6:37 AM, concerning plant: Chinese Peony (Paeonia lactiflora 'Myra MacRae')

"Paeonia 'Myra MacRae', (5-DB-PK) lactiflora cultivar Peony, (Tischler, 1967), USDA Hardiness Zone 2, Medium height, large double, lavender pink petals, cupped guard petals, late bloomer, Michigan Bloom Month 5-6.

Blooms are above the foliage. Unusual color. APS Gold Metal 1998. Bloomed second year after planting."

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By frankrichards16 on Apr 23, 2018 3:20 PM, concerning plant: Garden Peony (Paeonia 'Pink Hawaiian Coral')

"Paeonia 'Pink Hawaiian Coral', (2-SD-PK) Hybrid Peony, (Roy Klehm, 1981), USDA Hardiness Zone 2, Medium height, semi-double, coral pink petals, cupped, notched petal edges, yellow stamens, pink tipped carpels, fragrant, early bloomer, Michigan Bloom Month 5-6.

A cross of Charlie's White x Otto Froebel. Named after the color of the coral of the Hawaiian Islands. I have not been there or done that, so I cannot confirm. APS Gold Medal Award 2000. Award of Landscape Merit 2009."

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By frankrichards16 on Apr 23, 2018 2:42 PM, concerning plant: Itoh Peony (Paeonia 'Morning Lilac')

"Paeonia 'Morning Lilac', (2-SD-PK) Itoh Hybrid Peony, (Anderson, R.F., 1999), USDA Hardiness Zone 4, Short height, single to semi-double, Lavender Pink petals, random white streaks in petals, dark flared center, yellow stamens, red-tipped carpels, early bloomer , Michigan Bloom Month 5-6.

An intersectional hybrid: Pollen parent, Golden Era. Seed parent, Martha W. seedling. Dark green foliage. No blooms in the first and second year."

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By Paul2032 on Apr 23, 2018 9:03 AM, concerning plant: Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Goliath')

There is a great farm stand in my area where I buy tomatoes before my own are on. They grow Goliath and it is a very nice tomato with great flavor. I'm growing a plant this year.

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By rezvan95 on Apr 23, 2018 4:14 AM, concerning plant: Baby Rubber Plant (Peperomia obtusifolia 'Variegata')

Peperomia obtusifolia is capable of being attacked. Peperomias in general are not very susceptible to insect infestations of any kind, which makes them that much more desirable as indoor plants. While researching for information, I also discovered that one of the things these plants can suffer from is a plant virus called ringspot.

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By Polymerous on Apr 23, 2018 2:03 AM, concerning plant: Pacific Coast Iris (Iris 'Silver Moon')

I recently discovered this unregistered PCI iris, being sold by Sequim Rare Plants. http://sequimrareplants.com/Ir... After I ordered it, I did another search and discovered a different nursery *also* selling a PCI with the name "Silver Moon", but their image and description differs from that of the first nursery. http://www.yerbabuenanursery.c... A third nursery also carries a PCI "Silver Moon"; their image and description appears to match that of the second nursery. http://www.goldrushnursery.com...

So it looks like there are (at least) two different PCIs in commerce going under the (unregistered with the AIS) name of "Silver Moon".

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By Agoo on Apr 22, 2018 4:31 PM, concerning plant: Greater Perwinkle (Vinca major 'Maculata')

Started off with 3 plants I dug up from my son's place and now have over 200 plants. I even have variegated ones. How does that happen? It's really cool though to see blooms peeping through the snow. It prefers cooler weather and stays evergreen here year round.

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By frankrichards16 on Apr 22, 2018 10:27 AM, concerning plant: Chinese Peony (Paeonia lactiflora 'Monsieur Jules Elie')

"Paeonia 'Monsieur Jules Elie', (2-DB-PK) lactiflora cultivar Peony, (Crousse, 1888), USDA Hardiness Zone 4, Medium height, Large bomb double, light rose pink petals with a silvery sheen edge, smooth guards, rose fragrance, good cut, early bloomer , Michigan Bloom Month 5.

A popular heirloom."

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By frankrichards16 on Apr 22, 2018 9:19 AM, concerning plant: Intersectional Peony (Paeonia 'Momo Taro')

"Paeonia 'Momo Taro', (3-SL-WH) Itoh Hybrid Peony, (Anderson/Seidl/Bremer, 2017), USDA Hardiness Zone 4, Medium height, single, white/ cream/ peach petals, red flares, dark pink stigmas, white sheath, yellow stamens, midseason bloomer , Michigan Bloom Month 5-6.

Like most intersectional hybrids, it has excellent foliage. Good for landscaping. Named for the Japanese story 'Momo Taro-Peach Boy'. A (Tessera x lactiflora) cross."

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