The Garden.org Plants Database

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New Comments
By Duke44 on Jun 21, 2024 11:46 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Primal Scream')

Most intense orange I have ever seen in a daylily. Definity a must for the gardener who is looking for explosive colors.

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By Duke44 on Jun 21, 2024 11:41 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Maverick')

The daylily Maverick is more purple than the photos of it, also it can morph into the color of gunmetal.

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By Australis on Jun 20, 2024 11:49 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Ruby Parker 'The Moth')

This is a feathered mutant of Orchid (Cymbidium Ruby Parker) owned by Wain's Orchids from which divisions are occasionally sold (it is still in circulation as of 2024). It originated from a flask of plantlets purchased by David Wain from Guest Orchids many years ago.

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By Australis on Jun 20, 2024 11:47 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Ruby Parker)

This is an unregistered grex marketed under the tradename Ruby Parker by the originator of the cross, Guest Orchids. It was originally released in the 1990s and is still occasionally seen in Australia today.

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By Baja_Costero on Jun 20, 2024 10:18 PM, concerning plant: Euphorbia (Euphorbia clavarioides)

Cushion or mound-forming medusoid Euphorbia to about 12-18 inches in diameter. Short, densely packed arms radiate from each central head, which is relatively narrow for the group. The tip of each arm is distinctly flat (thus the name). Each arm will grow increasingly fat near the base in old age. Some clones rebranch (an arm will eventually become a new head), others are strictly solitary.

Greenish yellow or yellow cyathia with spreading glands bearing minute teeth on their outer margin. They resemble the cyathia of E. flanaganii (minus the teeth) and these 2 plants may be related, though the lower arms of clavarioides are not deciduous in the same way. Like the versions of flanaganii which branch, E. clavarioides can be propagated from arm cuttings, at least once they have formed a new head.

From central and eastern South Africa, widely distributed in nature at elevations over 1000m, found growing on rocks and rocky soil. Supposedly easy to confuse with a multi-stemmed E. ernestii. Apparently quite cold tolerant.

This plant varies in form (arms from 8-20mm wide, main stem 2-10cm wide) but it will look gangly in low light, like most medusas. In full sun the heads are dense and compact, not much space between stems, as found in nature, where they occur at ground level or sometimes a little buried. This plant enjoys excellent drainage and tolerates a dry lifestyle. Reluctant to flower in my experience.

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By Hembrain on Jun 20, 2024 12:25 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Golden Chimes')

In our garden, this cultivar initially blooms much lower than registered height- more like less than 20" tall, but goes on to rebloom taller, closer to 25", with even wider branching. Blooms are richly colored, with a brush of reddish on the back of the flower segments to echo the dark buds. Flowers are small, very delicate, 100 percent diamond-dusted and held at a charming lily-like angle from the wiry stem. Really cute! Fertile both ways.

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By thegardendeva on Jun 20, 2024 11:50 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Popoki Pookie')

Not registered as a Rebloomer, but sent up instant rebloom in its first blooming season this year in my Denver Zone 6a garden. Hybridizer confirms it reblooms for her in Minnesota. Yay - double the Kisses!

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By ILPARW on Jun 19, 2024 7:54 PM, concerning plant: English Plantain (Plantago lanceolata)

I call this the Narrowleaf Plantain. I know it as a very common lawn companion or weed, depending on whether one likes it or not. It is native to Eurasia and must have been brought to the eastern US from England and Europe along with the pasture grasses. The young leaves are supposed to be edible. There has been a little medicinal use from it, as with teas.

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By suzmarkhotmailcom on Jun 17, 2024 10:16 PM, concerning plant: Great Masterwort (Astrantia major 'Ruby Wedding')

I have owned this cultivar before. It can be quite fragrant if there's a handful of flowers in bloom. Fragrance is like baby powder. I moved and just replaced it with a new Ruby Wedding and sure enough, this one smells like baby powder too.
I don't know about the other cultivars whether they are fragrant or not

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By Baja_Costero on Jun 17, 2024 3:31 PM, concerning plant: Slender Candelabra Euphorbia (Euphorbia avasmontana)

Spiny, shrubby cactiform Euphorbia from southern Africa, growing to about 6 feet tall and wide. Mostly branched at the base, sometimes with occasional rebranching. Stems have 4-8 ribs and paired stipular spines; spine shields are joined in a continuous horny margin. Cyathia have yellow nectar glands and appear on new growth. Fruit is lobed.

Growth is quite seasonal (mostly in summer) and new spines may be intense red. Overall shape tends to be like a candelabra; branches initially are spreading but eventually grow upward. Young seedlings have a distinct pattern like variegation on the stem.

From South Africa and Namibia. Very similar to (and easily confused with) Euphorbia (Euphorbia virosa) (larger, globose fruit; potentially bigger overall; stems more constricted into segments) and Euphorbia (Euphorbia otavibergensis) (aka E. otavimontana) (stems deeply grooved and more constricted into segments). According to Carter, flowers and fruit are required to reliably distinguish E. avasmontana from E. virosa.

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