The Garden.org Plants Database

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By Kevalsha on Oct 23, 2017 4:45 AM, concerning plant: Shampoo Ginger (Zingiber zerumbet)

My shampoo ginger is growing very good in part shade. I use it when I am in the garden for washing my hands and face. I use it for shampoo also. It is very interesting because the flower looks like a red pine-cone and the little flowers are a pale yellow resembling a small orchid.

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By ricelg on Oct 22, 2017 2:03 PM, concerning plant: Texas Betony (Stachys coccinea)

I also ended up growing this in full sun. For me, it struggled much of the summer and did not grow extensively. As we've gone to fall, it's perked up a little and has rewarded some patience with some fresh blooms. I probably will move it to someplace out of the direct sun next year.

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By plantmanager on Oct 22, 2017 11:41 AM, concerning plant: Song of India (Dracaena reflexa)

This plant has been one of my best houseplants! It grows easily and quickly, and stem cuttings root very quickly. It's a striking plant that gets noticed immediately whenever I have new people come over. It's fun to just snip off a piece and let them go home happy. The more it is snipped, the bushier it gets. I do mist sometimes, but if you have a very dry atmosphere, it would be good to grow it over a water tray like an orchid.

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By Bonehead on Oct 22, 2017 11:38 AM, concerning plant: Western Maidenhair Fern (Adiantum aleuticum)

Native in the Pacific Northwest from the Aleutian Islands south to Chihuaha; and in the northeast from Newfoundland south to Maryland. Was previously classified as A. pedatum until 1991. A. pedatum does not grow well in the Pacific NW, loses vigor, and dies easily.

It is said that if a girl can hold a maidenhair stem without causing the leaves to tremble, she is chaste.

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By Pistil on Oct 22, 2017 12:25 AM, concerning plant: Digger's Speedwell (Veronica perfoliata)

This Parahebe (now included in the genus Veronica) is native to Australia, so you know it is drought tolerant. It is a root-hardy evergreen subshrub, but it blooms on last year's stalks, so a year might be missed if the plant is pruned hard too late the prior year, or if killed to the ground so that it has to resprout. It is a lax plant, with unusual dusty blue-gray perfoliate leaves and lovely violet-blue flowers for a long time from late spring into summer. Place in sun or light shade. It is a "Great Plants Pick" for the Maritime Northwest for dry shade! Very easy in Seattle. Nothing bothers it.

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By evelyninthegarden on Oct 21, 2017 8:29 PM, concerning plant: Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Indeescent Exposure')

Please go to Rockytop Gardens to see this iris. It has soft peachy-pink flowers, with a sunlight golden center and very gold beards. I believe that the description that is listed for this plant may not be accurate.

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By Bonehead on Oct 20, 2017 8:54 PM, concerning plant: Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum 'Yezo Nishiki')

This maple absolutely glows in the fall, a real head turner. I posted a picture but it really doesn't do it justice. Wish I was a better photographer!

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By Bonehead on Oct 19, 2017 9:20 AM, concerning plant: Pathfinder (Adenocaulon bicolor)

Native in the Pacific Northwest on both sides of the Cascade Range in Washington, British Columbia, south to California, east through the Rockies to Wisconsin and Ontario. Found in moist, shady woods at low to mid elevations. The crushed leaves have been used as a poultice. If you walk through a patch of pathfinder, the silvery undersides of the leaves turned over by your feet will show you the way home.

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By Australis on Oct 19, 2017 1:13 AM, concerning plant: Master's Cymbidium (Cymbidium mastersii 'Supremo')

This is a known tetraploid and the best clone of the species produced by Royale Orchids to date.

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By Australis on Oct 19, 2017 12:42 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium 'Summer Perfume')

Like Orchid (Cymbidium 'Feast'), this is not a registered grex and the few photos online seem to indicate that a single clone is sold under this name. It is another frequently imported from Asia. A few comments online seem to suggest that it may be related to Cym. ensifolium.

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By Australis on Oct 18, 2017 7:58 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium erythraeum 'Lois')

This is a known alba form of the species.

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By Australis on Oct 18, 2017 7:49 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium erythrostylum 'Blumen Insel')

This is a diploid alba clone of the species and has been selfed, so is known to be fertile.

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By Australis on Oct 18, 2017 7:44 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium tracyanum 'Tetra Royale')

Another tetraploid (4N) clone of the species owned by Royale Orchids in NSW, Australia.

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By TBGDN on Oct 18, 2017 2:54 PM, concerning plant: Mockernut (Carya alba)

At this time of year leaves of this hickory are brilliant in shades of golden yellow. Although not suitable for landscape trees they are gorgeous in natural wooded settings among mature species of other trees. My only tree was damaged by age and storms and had to be removed a few years back. I decided against replacing it because of the massive volume of hickory nuts produced in autumn. In natural wooded areas they are great for encouraging wildlife.

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By Australis on Oct 18, 2017 6:19 AM, concerning plant: Ivory-Colored Cymbidium (Cymbidium eburneum 'Darch')

This plant is one of Ezi-Gro's diploid breeding plants.

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By Australis on Oct 18, 2017 6:15 AM, concerning plant: Devon's Cymbidium (Cymbidium devonianum 'His & Hers')

This is a known diploid (2N) and was used by New Horizon Orchids to make a triploid version of Cym. Devon Eruption.

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By Australis on Oct 18, 2017 6:12 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Sweet Eruption 'New Horizon')

This plant is a known tetraploid (4N).

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By greene on Oct 17, 2017 4:26 PM, concerning plant: Winter's Sunflower (Helianthus winteri)

New Perennial Species From the Southern Sierra Nevada Foothills, California
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New Wild Sunflower Species
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By Baja_Costero on Oct 17, 2017 3:01 PM, concerning plant: Mountain Grass (Kleinia neriifolia)

Large, much-branched succulent shrub with glaucous, sausage-like stems and narrow, summer-deciduous green leaves. Very seasonal growth pattern (winter grower, summer dormant). Probably best suited to mild Mediterranean (winter rainfall) climates. Potentially a large plant in the ground. The amount of branching is variable. A wide-leafed natural form called ovatifolia branches a lot.

Propagate from stem cuttings in fall. Provide strong light for best form and stability. Water regularly (general succulent care) from fall through spring (and summer, in mild climates). Provide good drainage and ample space in containers.

From the Canary Islands, where it may be easily confused with native Euphorbias (but unlike them, does not exude a dangerous sap).

Formerly known as Senecio kleinia.

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By Baja_Costero on Oct 17, 2017 1:38 PM, concerning plant: Pachypodium (Pachypodium brevicaule)

The lowest and weirdest of the Pachypodiums, from Madagascar. This caudiciform succulent grows as a fat, low, amorphous blob with spines and deciduous leaves at the growth points. May reach about 3 feet wide in old age, rarely over a third that size in cultivation. Usually yellow flowers, though a white-flowered version (leucoxanthum) does exist. Susceptible to rot on its own roots but much easier and likely a longer lived plant when grafted onto lamerei or geayi. Very seasonal growth pattern.

Not a beginner Pachypodium. Requires warm temperatures, strong light, excellent drainage, and attention to watering. Water more in summer, especially when it's warm, and less in winter. Avoid letting the soil go completely dry.

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