The Garden.org Plants Database

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New Comments
By debremaecker on Jul 20, 2024 4:15 PM, concerning plant: Blue Shrub Sage (Salvia ballotiflora)

I have several of these plants that I purchased years ago from a plant sale at the National Wildflower Center in Austin. They are tough and hardy and bees and butterflies love them.
Does anyone know the best way to propagate Salvia Ballotiflora?
I'm having a hard time identifying the seeds. Are they black when ready and extremely small?

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By Baja_Costero on Jul 17, 2024 5:49 PM, concerning plant: Pearl Plant (Tulista pumila)

Green former Haworthia (now in a separate genus) growing up to 8 inches, with raised whitish tubercles on the leaves. Solitary or slowly clumping. Variable in color and surface texture. 3 varieties currently recognized by the CoL (ohkuwae has denser, more prominent tubercles; sparsa the opposite and more of a purple color).

Yellow, red, purplish or brown when stressed. Natural hybrids with Astroloba exist. A form with round, donut-shaped tubercles is sold in the trade under the name 'Donuts', though it seems the name is frequently misused for other, more typical versions.

4 species of former Haworthias are in the recently separated genus Tulista, placed there based on genetic evidence of their relatedness. They are closer to Aristaloe and Astroloba than other Haworthias and aloes.

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By Baja_Costero on Jul 17, 2024 5:32 PM, concerning plant: Haworthia pygmaea

Windowed Haworthia from the western cape. Few leaves, with rough surface texture (usually) and opaque windows. The amount and type of raised texture varies. Several named varieties have been described. Slowly offsetting. White flowers with greenish veins. Popular in hybridization because of the leaf shape and texture. Some plants (eg. var. acuminata) may lack tubercles on the leaf surface and have small white dots instead.

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By Baja_Costero on Jul 17, 2024 5:24 PM, concerning plant: Caballona (Ferocactus macrodiscus)

Solitary blue-green or yellow-green barrel cactus from the highlands of central Mexico. Usually flat and low, to 12-16 inches wide and 4 inches tall. 13-35 sharp, usually tuberculate ribs; red or yellow recurved (sometimes straight) spines with 4 flattened central spines forming a cross and 6-8 round radial spines. Flowers are purplish pink with white edges, fruit is the same color. Serious tap root.

From San Luis Potosí, Querétaro, Guanajuato, Puebla, Oaxaca. Two subspecies: the type is blue-green with shallow areoles and curved spines; ssp. septentionalis, from Guanajuato, is greenish yellow with more pronounced areoles and long, straight spines.

Not among the more common members of the genus in cultivation.

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By Baja_Costero on Jul 17, 2024 5:11 PM, concerning plant: Uebelmannia (Uebelmannia pectinifera)

Solitary Brazilian cactus to 30 inches or more tall and 6 inches wide, with small yellow daytime flowers in summer followed by purple/red fruit. 15-40 sharp ribs, 1-4 dark spines per areole, little separation between areoles, fine fur along ribs. Dark reddish brown stem (color depends on exposure) with waxy white scales or scurf and a bumpy texture.

The 3 subspecies of U. pectinifera are similar and occur close to each other. Ssp. pectinifera (18 ribs, ~20" tall) occurs at higher altitudes; ssp. flavispina has up to 29 ribs and reaches up to ~14" tall; ssp. horrida has >23 ribs and may reach up to 3 feet or more.

Kind of a collector's plant. Not especially common in cultivation, endangered in habitat.

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By Frillylily on Jul 17, 2024 1:36 PM, concerning plant: Flaky Juniper (Juniperus squamata 'Blue Star')

This is a lovely evergreen that is robust while also slow growing. If you need a small shrub w winter color and texture that will not quickly outgrow its personal space, this is your pick. This beautiful evergreen shrub offers unique blue color, as well as texture. It looks nice paired with other colors such as lime, bronze, deep green, or reddish or purple foliages. It is a commonly sold shrub, easy to find and affordable for the average gardener. Grows in average soil, and very cold hardy, while also taking hot summers and even doing well in partial/dappled shade. Avoid placing up close to foundations or along porches/buildings where the back side may brown out due to having little or no sun, unless you are okay with it being one sided.

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By LoriMT on Jul 17, 2024 10:07 AM, concerning plant: Sweet Pepper (Capsicum 'Italian Pepperoncini')

Italian Pepperoncini is a compact, but productive plant, growing about 2-foot tall, with many peppers. The peppers grew about 3" long, starting out a yellow-green color, and ripening to red in 80 days from transplant for me. The pepper walls are thin and crunchy, the seeds and membranes are mildly hot, though not as hot as jalapeno peppers.

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By SunriseSide on Jul 16, 2024 11:32 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Spirit Fox')

Slightly watermarked

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By sallyg on Jul 15, 2024 1:55 PM, concerning plant: Cypress Vine (Ipomoea quamoclit)

Charming vine but beware the growth potential and the self seeding! I grew it on my garden fence, the vine makes loads of blooms and thus loads of seed. New ones are still coming up in July with each turn of any soil. And while it looks lacey and airy, enough of them can cast a good bit of shade. I'm not sure where this is best used but NOT on my vegetable garden fence. Maybe someone can gift me an extra acre and I can grow this and other thugs on a frame surrounded by mown area.

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By TheMainer on Jul 14, 2024 7:53 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Blueberry Candy')

I planted five of these in two different areas in 2021. All of them stayed spindly and small with no blossoms, and two finally gave up and died despite all my efforts. I promised those that remained that I would pull them out if they didn't do any better. Lo and behold, they are looking strong and beautiful with large, gorgeous blossoms this season. I guess they are just "late bloomers" and needed time to get rolling. So glad I waited.

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