The Garden.org Plants Database

There are 723,174 plants, and 476,188 images in this world class database of plants, which is collaboratively developed by over 3,500 Garden.org members from around the globe. (View more stats)

New Comments
By HemNorth on Feb 23, 2018 1:09 AM, concerning plant: Knautia (Knautia macedonica)

Knautia macedonica was named after the German doctor, Christoph Knaut, who lived from 1638 to 1694.
The second part of the name is referring to Macedonia, on the Balkan Peninsula. I'm sure there must be a story here somewhere.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Feb 23, 2018 12:27 AM, concerning plant: Large Cupped Daffodil (Narcissus 'Ida May')

In 1968 this classic daffodil was registered. There has since been some discussion by daffodil heavyweights on the exact color sequence to use to describe its flower. ADS says W-OOY, Philips short list has W-YRW, Broadfield has W-R. Fourth, Radcliff (Australian breeder) has it as W/R. Definitely some unusual coloring there that some have hailed as a color break.
Ida May is both seed and pollen fertile. It has acted as the seed parent in 4 crosses and as the pollen parent 5 times.

(W - white / O - orange / Y - yellow / R - red)

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Marilyn on Feb 22, 2018 9:50 PM, concerning plant: Scarlet Rooster Sage (Salvia dichlamys 'Super Elk')

Scarlet Rooster Sage (Salvia dichlamys 'Super Elk') is a new salvia that was just introduced by Flowers By The Sea. A long season of flowering and a bright color of orange that is sure to attract the attention and delight of hummingbirds. A super salvia and looks to be another winner from Flowers By The Sea that I and others will be interested in growing this year.

FBTS sells, grows and specializes in salivas and is located in Elk, CA.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Feb 22, 2018 7:16 PM, concerning plant: Victoria Water Lily (Victoria amazonica)

The second-largest leaf in the world at up to 8 feet in diameter.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Danita on Feb 22, 2018 6:57 PM, concerning plant: Purple Porterweed (Stachytarpheta frantzii)

Stachytarpheta frantzii is a wonderful plant for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds. Since it isn't hardy here, it is grown in a container that gets wheeled into an unheated garage during the winter. The cold temperatures (sometimes near freezing) in the garage usually cause the plant to drop its leaves and enter dormancy. When temperatures begin to warm, it quickly grows new leaves. It seems as though the plant may be sterile or self-sterile. Achenes that I've collected from the plant lack an actual seed inside.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By DaylilySLP on Feb 22, 2018 6:56 PM, concerning plant: Evergreen Azalea (Rhododendron 'Cascade')

Hybridized by Morrison

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By DaylilySLP on Feb 22, 2018 5:59 PM, concerning plant: XPetchoa SuperCal® Blushing Pink

Petchoa hybrid, Petunia-Calibrachoa Cross

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Baja_Costero on Feb 22, 2018 4:02 PM, concerning plant: Buddha Belly Plant (Jatropha podagrica)

Ornamental pachycaul with a swollen base, deciduous leaves, and bright orange or red flowers. Native to Central America. Looks good when leafy, looks good when leafless (especially when grown to favor the bottle form), looks great in bloom. Relatively common in cultivation. Monoecious and self fertile.

The form of this plant can be quite different depending on where and how it's grown. In the ground, it loses its "fat" look and grows much taller (to about 6 feet). In containers, especially given limited space, it will be a stouter, shorter plant. You can also prune it to favor this form. Strong light and excellent drainage are important. Leaves may grow bigger in partially shaded locations.

In tropical climates this plant may flower and grow year round. In subtropical climates it may lose most or all of its leaves in the fall or winter. Do not overwater at this time. When the plant is in leaf and temperatures are warm, water regularly.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By frankrichards16 on Feb 22, 2018 11:51 AM, concerning plant: White Fir (Abies concolor 'Hosta la Vista')

A dwarf white fir. Thick, blue-green needles with a glaucous, powdery coating on the surfaces. My specimen is on Balsam stock and is about 9 years old (propagated by Jon Genereaux, Hidden Lake Gardens). It's currently ~20Hx24W inches.

The cultivar is from a witch's broom found at Hidden Lake Gardens (Michigan State University), Tipton, Michigan by Gary Gee of Gee Farms Nursery, Stockton, Michigan. The mother witches broom is located in Hosta Hillside, the garden's Hosta collection. 'Hosta la Vista' literally means 'View of the Hostas.' First named Abies concolor 'Hidden Lakes WB.'

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By DaylilySLP on Feb 22, 2018 11:17 AM, concerning plant: Baby's Breath (Gypsophila paniculata Festival Star™)

Hybridized by Danziger, 2004 (PP14818)

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By frankrichards16 on Feb 22, 2018 10:31 AM, concerning plant: Zabelia tyaihyoni Sweet Emotion®

Abelia mosanensis 'SMNAMDS'. Developed by Timothy D. Wood from Spring Meadow Nursery, Grand Haven, Michigan in 2012. Compared to the species, it is more uniform, has darker colored buds (dark rosy pink) and is more fragrant (sweet jasmine). It's hardy down to -30 F, which would be zone 4. A Proven Winners selection. Attractive seed heads. Orange fall foliage. Semi-evergreen.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By DaylilySLP on Feb 22, 2018 10:16 AM, concerning plant: Gaillardia (Gaillardia aristata Sunburst™ Yellow)

Hybridized by Gutter, 2008 (PP19748)

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By frankrichards16 on Feb 22, 2018 9:54 AM, concerning plant: Hardy Abelia (Zabelia tyaihyoni)

Requires full sun and flowers on old wood, which means that it should be pruned after flowering. Recommended by Michael Dirr. More hardy than A. x grandiflora which has not survived the Michigan winters for me. Pink buds open to fragrant, tubular, pinkish-white flowers. Attractive to butterflies. Fall foliage is orange-red. Semi-evergreen. AKA Zabelia tyaihyonii and commonly call fragrant Abelia or Korean Abelia (It's a native of Korea). Abelia 'Bridal Bouquet' could be a marketing name for the species or possibly the same as A. mosanensis 'Monia'.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By frankrichards16 on Feb 22, 2018 9:20 AM, concerning plant: Glossy Abelia (Linnaea chinensis Ruby Anniversary™)

Abelia chinensis 'Keiser' is an improved selection developed by Susan Keiser of Ossining, NY. It was tested and patented (uspp21632) by Spring Meadow Nursery in Grand Haven, Michigan. Improvements include a more upright habit, burgundy tinted foliage, and larger (more fragrant) flowers . Deer resistant. Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. A Proven Winners® ColorChoice® selection. More hardy than Abelia x grandiflora. Rated at zone 5 rather than 6.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Cakeholemoon on Feb 22, 2018 12:27 AM, concerning plant: Common Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum)

Is the Common Teasel a carnivorous plant? The leaves of this plant form a cup at the base where they attach to the stem. When it rains, the leaf basin fills with water. Insects become trapped in the water and die. There have been studies which have shown that this plant can benefit from the additional nitrogen and phosphorous from the decaying insects. The benefit: increased seed production. Good news for the Goldfinches!

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Kevinlp on Feb 22, 2018 12:04 AM, concerning plant: English Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

I am quite new to the gardening scene. So new in fact, I have yet to plant a seed with my own two hands in the garden. So any advice would be greatly appreciated. This garden is located in Northern California in the Bay Area. The seeds I wish to plant are Lavandula Angustifolia. From what little I have read this plant is fragrant, deer resistant, and repels mosquitoes. The last part about repelling mosquitoes is the main reason I bought the seeds in the first place.

From what I have read, unfortunately, this plant needs a lot of sun, which I am not sure where I want to plant them will provide. My first question is how much sun is required, during the Summer months for this plant to survive? For mosquito repelling purposes, would one potted plant be enough to keep a 10' radius free of mosquitoes? Lastly, what advice would you give to get a seed to become a Lavandula Angustifolia plant?

Thank you for reading this comment. I very much look forward to reading your responses.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Cakeholemoon on Feb 21, 2018 11:46 PM, concerning plant: Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)

I have two Purple Loosestrife plants on my property and they are very much in control at the edge of my pond. How do I keep them in control? They are in the shade!

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Cakeholemoon on Feb 21, 2018 10:51 PM, concerning plant: Red Baneberry (Actaea rubra)

There is a big patch of these plants growing in Latah County, Idaho. I do not have this plant at my home for fear that a person or an animal may eat a berry by accident. "The berries, foliage, and roots are highly poisonous. As few as two berries can induce vomiting, bloody diarrhea and finally cardiac arrest or respiratory system paralysis." (from Plants of Southern Interior British Columbia and the Inland Northwest by Parish, Coupe, and Lloyd).

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Cakeholemoon on Feb 21, 2018 10:35 PM, concerning plant: Houndstongue (Cynoglossum officinale)

Houndstongue is a beautiful plant in the spring. It boasts many tiny, nodding, burgundy-colored flowers. However, in the fall, this plant becomes a terrible weed to avoid at all costs. The beautiful little flowers spend their summer creating little tick-sized and shaped seeds that will stick to anything and everything that brushes by them! These plants can become invasive and can cause real problems for livestock and other animals.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Cakeholemoon on Feb 21, 2018 10:21 PM, concerning plant: Absinthe (Artemisia absinthium)

This plant has invaded part of my land, which is an old abandoned railroad bed in eastern Washington. It is hot and dry in the summer and cold and wet in the winter. I have cows and horses in this area, which probably helps this Artemisia to spread and flourish because the animals keep the grass competition down. I have distilled this plant just because I like to make my own essential oils. The oil is a very dark green and has a very strong odor.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

» Continue viewing recent comments
» View recently added plants

Timer: 4.38 jiffies (0.043838024139404).

Today's site banner is by Paul2032 and is called "Hosta Great Expectations and Corydalis lutea"