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By Baja_Costero on Nov 11, 2019 7:46 PM, concerning plant: Santa Maria Barrel Cactus (Ferocactus santa-maria)

Solitary cylindrical barrel cactus to about 2 feet tall and 10 inches wide with yellow flowers in summer, from southern Baja California. About 13 ribs. 4 straight gray central spines, the lower one longer and slightly curved. About 15 radial spines, varying in thickness. Yellow, fleshy, edible fruit.

Found near Santa María Bay in Baja California Sur. This plant is related to and was formerly a subspecies of F. peninsulae, a native of central Baja California. It may be easily confused with the widespread F. wislizeni from outside of BC.

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By Baja_Costero on Nov 11, 2019 2:04 PM, concerning plant: Dudleya rubens

Whitish rosette succulent from the Sierras of central and southern Baja California with relatively few, wide leaves and pink or pinkish, tubular flowers. Leaves are glaucous and 2-3 inches long. Rosettes are solitary or may divide a few times in old age. Found in geographically distinct areas in northern and central Baja California Sur, at elevations from 2400 to 5000 feet. Populations in different locations have different chromosome numbers.

This species may be easily confused with D. pulverulenta ssp. arizonica, which does not branch and has taller inflorescences with more bracts (and grows farther north in AZ and CA).

This plant is rare in cultivation.

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By celestialrose on Nov 10, 2019 8:23 PM, concerning plant: Rose (Rosa 'Mary Queen of Scots')

I have been growing this delightful scots rose for many years and love it for the fact it is the very first rose to bloom in my zone 4b garden. Hardy, fragrant, carefree, disease free....and the tiny blooms and leaves are perfection. Mary welcomes spring to my yard!

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By Baja_Costero on Nov 10, 2019 8:22 PM, concerning plant: Slipper Plant (Euphorbia lomelii)

Sonoran Desert succulent with upright cylindrical green stems and bright orange-red (rarely yellow) blooms from spring through early fall. This plant grows as a low shrub to about 3 feet tall, branching mostly at the base. Soft grown plants in cultivation may get larger. It is found in Baja California from the Central Desert south to the tip of the peninsula, on offshore islands in the Gulf of California, and in the neighboring states of Sonora and Sinaloa on the other side of the Gulf.

Formerly known as Pedilanthus macrocarpus but recently moved to Euphorbia, with flowers that are very atypical for a Euphorbia. Reasonably common and well-behaved in cultivation. Suitable for larger containers.

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By Baja_Costero on Nov 10, 2019 4:30 PM, concerning plant: Agave (Agave cerulata subsp. dentiens)

Island endemic subspecies of a medium-sized, offsetting Baja California native agave. Green to light glaucous gray leaves. Wider panicles than the type subspecies (lateral branches on the upper half reach 30-40cm long). Found on San Esteban Island in the middle of the Gulf of California. That island is actually part of Sonora.

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By Baja_Costero on Nov 10, 2019 4:26 PM, concerning plant: Agave (Agave cerulata)

Pale green, yellow or rarely glaucous gray agave from Baja California which often offsets abundantly. Individual plants reach about 1.5-3 feet wide. Brown eyelets often appear around the spines, which are small to medium in size and tend to be easily detached. Inflorescence is a panicle from 6 to 12 feet tall. This plant grows in desert landscapes from about 27°N to just past 30°N, an area where fogs and ocean breezes often occur. It was eaten by native populations.

This species is closely related to A. deserti (and also placed in the Deserticolae). The two close relatives can be resolved based on size (deserti tends to be larger), leaf color (deserti tends to be more gray-green), spine details (deserti lacks the brown eyelets), and geographical origin (deserti occurs to the north, from 30°N to past 35°N, in BC, CA, AZ, and SO).

Various subspecies of cerulata have been described:

Century Plant (Agave cerulata subsp. cerulata) (mostly yellowish leaves, mostly 6-12 times as long as broad, margins nearly straight or slightly undulate; narrow panicles to 30-40cm wide; widespread over the central part of the species' range);

Agave (Agave cerulata subsp. dentiens) (green to light glaucous gray leaves, mostly 6-12 times as long as broad, margins nearly straight or slightly undulate; wider panicles to 60-80cm wide; from San Esteban Island);

Agave (Agave cerulata subsp. nelsonii) (light gray to glaucous green leaves, mostly 3-6 times as long as broad, margins undulate or nearly straight; found at the northern extent of the species' range near 30°N, plus populations at 29°N; found at higher elevations; previously considered part of deserti); and

Agave (Agave cerulata subsp. subcerulata) (mostly light gray to glaucous green leaves, mostly 3-6 times as long as broad, smaller than the other subspecies, margins crenate; found at the southern extent of the species' range near 27°N near San Ignacio, plus San Marcos Island).

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By celestialrose on Nov 10, 2019 11:37 AM, concerning plant: Rose (Rosa 'Quietness')

I have grown Quietness in my zone 4b garden for over 13 years. At one time I grew over 300 roses and this one was my favorite and remains my favorite to this day, long after many roses have left my garden. I consider it a near-perfect rose for cold climates. It's hardy to the tips, vigorous and tall, blooms profusely and repeats, the blooms are perfection, the color is cool and serene and is disease-free. Its only downfall is the lack of a strong fragrance, which some can detect but which eludes me, but you can't have it all.

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By Baja_Costero on Nov 9, 2019 8:26 PM, concerning plant: Agave (Agave azurea)

Glaucous blue-green agave from the Vizcaíno Desert of central Baja California. Solitary rosettes to 3-4 feet wide, with stiff, erect, well-armed leaves. Relatively short inflorescences with few branches.

Described in 2014. Found about 100km SE of Guerrero Negro, at the base of the Vizcaíno peninsula. Related to Agave vizcainoensis from the peninsula, further to the west.

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By Baja_Costero on Nov 9, 2019 8:07 PM, concerning plant: Mammillaria (Mammillaria neopalmeri)

Clumping island endemic cactus from Baja California with whitish flowers. Axils have wool and short, twisted bristles. 3-5 brown central spines, 25-30 white radial spines. Reddish club-shaped fruit. From San Benito and Guadalupe Islands in the Pacific Ocean.

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By jathton on Nov 9, 2019 12:10 PM, concerning plant: Northern Lady Fern (Athyrium asplenioides var. angustum 'Lady in Red')

The friend who gave me a clump pf Northern Lady Fern in spring, 2016 told me to pot it up for a while... then plant it in the garden. By mid-summer it had begun to crowd its original pot... so I moved it up to a 17 inch double-walled plastic pot. That fall it looked so good in the pot I decided to leave it there through the winter. [It is, after all, hardy to zone 2.] By summer, 2017 this fern had exploded into a huge, beautifully shaped fern that completely filled the larger pot.

That fall I dug it out of the large pot and divided the creeping rhizome into several sections and gave them to friends. The one section I kept was planted in my shade garden... but sadly did not survive that winter.

Now that I've found a reputable source for potted hardy ferns, I'll be getting another Northern Lady Fern next spring... I have just the place for it.

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