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By Marilyn on May 27, 2018 5:28 PM, concerning plant: Mealy Cup Sage (Salvia farinacea 'Gruppenblau')

Gruppenblau translated from german to english is Group Blue.

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By lauribob on May 27, 2018 7:58 AM, concerning plant: Sedum 'Little Missy'

I bought this in 2018 from Mountain Crest Gardens who listed it on their website as being hardy to zone 5. I'm seeing different information here and on other websites, as well as one other site selling this plant who also lists it as hardy to zone 5. I've already planted it in my zone 5 rock garden so I'll just have to wait and see. Will update this comment next spring.

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By Baja_Costero on May 26, 2018 2:11 PM, concerning plant: Aloe (Aloe aculeata)

Extra spiny stemless aloe with incurved leaves from southern Africa. The species name refers to the prominent spines on the leaf surfaces. Solitary and grown from seed. Inflorescences are usually branched on older plants and racemes are densely flowered. The flowers are yellow to orange, but orange to red in bud, thus often but not always bicolor. Flowers are ventricose (with a little belly) and have exserted stamens and style.

Drought tolerant. Leaves may turn orange, brown or red in full sun.

Featured on the back of the South African 10 cent coin from 1965 to 1989.

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By robertduval14 on May 26, 2018 11:15 AM, concerning plant: Carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus 'Chantenay Red Cored')

This carrot variety, introduced in 1929, is a large stump rooted carrot with exceptional sweetness. It also has a notable history as being behind the case of Campbell Soup Company vs. Wentz (1948).

https://www.casebriefs.com/blo...

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By wildflowers on May 26, 2018 10:06 AM, concerning plant: Lindenleaf Sage (Salvia tiliifolia)

This is one of those plants that show up every year somewhere in the garden when the temps warm up from self-sown seed; but not in an aggressive way. A welcome sight.

At one time (or maybe still) this plant was used by Tarahumara Indians as a source of energy for marathon runners and hunters. The seeds were also used by Aztec Indian Warriors. Seeds can be harvested and used just like the more popular variety of chia (salvia hispanica). They are considered beneficial and medicinal food rich in antioxidants and high amounts of Omega 3 fatty acids as well as calcium, iron and fiber. Once harvested, the seeds are roasted and crushed then mixed with water, making a gel containing a concentrated source of energy.

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By plantmanager on May 26, 2018 9:19 AM, concerning plant: Crassula (Crassula capitella 'Campfire')

This has been an amazing plant! It glows red with the cold, or when it gets lots of sun. It's easy to propagate. I just remove a piece and stick it back in the soil. It roots quickly. This is a perfect plant for sharing with friends, and for using as fillers in pots and in ground places that need a bit more greenery.

The only bad thing about my plant is that indoors it is prone to mealybugs. You have to stop them quickly, or you lose the plant. The mealybugs haven't been a problem with plants grown outdoors.

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By Bonehead on May 25, 2018 3:45 PM, concerning plant: Pole Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris 'Seychelles')

55 days to maturity. Yields heavy crops of slender, tender, light green, stringless beans. Grows 7-9 feet tall on trellis.

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By critterologist on May 25, 2018 10:58 AM, concerning plant: Salvia Rockin'® Deep Purple

Saw this plant at the Proven Winners booth at the 2018 Philly Garden Show and was very impressed (I Love Purple). Looked it up on the Proven Winners site and would like to correct a detail above... they say it does NOT need deadheading to flower all season long (probably because the blooms are sterile)

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By Australis on May 25, 2018 1:18 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Kiata 'Royal Velvet')

At minimum, this clone exists as a tetraploid (4N).

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By Australis on May 25, 2018 12:40 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Kiata 'Nightshade')

This clone exists in both diploid (2N) and tetraploid (4N) forms and is reported to be slow-growing and compact for a standard Cymbidium.

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By Australis on May 24, 2018 11:53 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Peter Pan 'Greensleeves')

This is a known tetraploid (4N).

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By Australis on May 24, 2018 10:56 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Phar Lap 'Yoshi Kage')

This is thought to be a natural tetraploid (4N).

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By Australis on May 24, 2018 10:55 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Phar Lap 'Geyserland')

This is a triploid (3N) that is known to occasionally produce seed when crossed with the right partner.

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By Australis on May 24, 2018 10:20 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Last Tango 'Geyserland')

This is a known tetraploid (4N).

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By Australis on May 24, 2018 10:13 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Lowmeralda 'Twist and Shout')

This is a diploid and a known alba carrier. It is one of Springfield Orchids' breeding plants and is occasionally available to purchase.

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By Australis on May 24, 2018 10:13 PM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Lowmeralda 'Graceful Anna')

This is a diploid and a known alba carrier. It is one of Springfield Orchids' breeding plants and is occasionally available to purchase.

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By DogsNDaylilies on May 24, 2018 4:30 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Lights of Detroit')

I absolutely LOVE this flower's form, but it is really a difficult plant to hybridize with! I've tried hybridizing it as both a pod and pollen parent many times and it produces a lot of squishy seeds and the pollen is nearly impossible. I have managed a few seeds with it from sheer persistence, but viability of the seeds remains to be seen.

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By DogsNDaylilies on May 24, 2018 4:23 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Karen Stephens')

The blooms on this one are such a gorgeous, deep red, I found myself wanting to hybridize with it a lot. Pollen is good, although I don't have enough data handy to comment on how good.

She might be a little on the tender side up north. It looks like I lost her over this past winter, but I did pickaxe her from a northern garden, so she might have perished for other reasons.

Edited to add: I wasn't meaning to be funny on that last line..."pickaxe" is supposed to read "pick;" but, for once, auto-correct changed my word to something that was far more appropriate and hilarious. I'm leaving it. :)

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By DogsNDaylilies on May 24, 2018 4:18 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Ginger Cookie')

This daylily is a very fast multiplier for me here up north. It also takes pollen very well when hybridizing. (I have not used it much, if at all, as a pollen parent, so no data there.) Cute blooms with a somewhat unique coloring. Dark green foliage.

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By HollyAnnS on May 23, 2018 11:10 PM, concerning plant: Dwarf Solomon's Seal (Polygonatum humile)

Excellent plant for small pots and mini-gardens. Self seeding and overwinters in pots.

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