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By ILPARW on Sep 25, 2018 1:14 PM, concerning plant: Hay-scented Fern (Dennstaedtia punctilobula)

Hay-scented Fern gets its common name from when the foliage is crushed, it smells like hay. It usually is 1.5 to 2 feet high, but can get to 3 or 4 feet high. It has lacy, very soft, thin, light green leaves that are erect or arching and the fronds are triangular in shape. The sori (spore-producing structures) under the leaves are along the leaflet (pinnae) margins and are cup-shaped. The species spreads quickly by the underground stems (rhizomes) to form a colony or a groundcover. My biggest customer has a nice patch in her shady front yard east corner that succeeded in producing another colony in the front yard close to the house among her Common Periwinkle groundcover, apparently by spores. She has me pulling out the fronds in that second area so that it is under control. This species is native from north Alabama & Georgia up into southern Newfoundland & southwest Quebec through southern Ontario through Michigan to southern Illinois & Missouri. I have seen often in the forests of eastern Pennsylvania. I see it very occasionally in some professional or plant enthusiast landscapes. It is sold by some larger, diverse conventional nurseries, native plant nurseries, and some mail order nurseries.

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By ILPARW on Sep 25, 2018 11:37 AM, concerning plant: Interrupted Fern (Osmunda claytoniana)

Interrupted fern has a native range from northern Alabama & Georgia up through Maine into southeast Canada over into much of Minnesota down into Arkansas. Its fiddleheads that come up in early spring are silvery-white. It forms a spreading vase-shaped form of usually about 2 to 3 feet high, but can get to 5 feet if really thriving. Its infertile leaflets look much like those of the Cinnamon Fern. It gets its name of "Interrupted" by having 2 to 7 pairs of fertile leaflets in the middle of the fronds that develop into brown or tan shaggy masses of spores in spring, releasing spores. Then in mid-summer these fertile leaflets and spore masses fall of, leaving bare areas that look like the fronds have been interrupted. The root system is both fibrous and of thick, heavy rhizomes. It is sold at some large, diverse nurseries, native plant nurseries, and specialty mail order nurseries. It is not common in most landscapes. One landscape that has a good number is Frank Lloyd Wright's Talies in Wisconsin.

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By Australis on Sep 25, 2018 3:35 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Cymbidium Lowio-grandiflorum)

In Victoria, Australia, this grex is often mislabelled as one of its parents, the species Low's Cymbidium (Cymbidium lowianum). I have seen two such mislabellings in the past year. The plant seems to be relatively common in older collections as well.

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By ILPARW on Sep 24, 2018 9:27 AM, concerning plant: Dixie Wood Fern (Dryopteris x australis)

The Dixie Wood Fern is a natural hybrid of the Log Fern (Dryopteris Celsa) x the Southern Wood Fern ( Dryopteris ludoviciana). It is found in the wild in some counties in some local spots in the South in Maryland, southeast Virginia, northeast North Carolina, north South Carolina, northern Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, southern Tennessee, Arkansas, and Louisiana. This hybrid is sterile. It gets about 4 to 5 feet high with dark green, thick textured, semi-evergreen fronds. It stays as a good clump. If any spreading it is not much. I've only seen it at Jenkins Arboretum in southeast Pennsylvania. Some native plant nurseries in or near the South offer it and some specialty plant mail order nurseries. It is a beautiful fern.

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By ILPARW on Sep 24, 2018 8:45 AM, concerning plant: Sensitive Fern (Onoclea sensibilis)

Sensitive Fern is gets its common name because it is sensitive to the first frost, drought, and the leaves rapidly wilt if picked. Its native range is in southeast Canada from Newfoundland to Manitoba down to eastern Texas to northern Florida back up through New England, growing wild in swamps, marshes, and bottomlands. It usually gets about 1.5 to 2 feet high, but can get to 4 feet high. Its sterile fronds are coarse, triangular in shaped, and simple pinnatifid and about 1.5 to 4 feet long. Its separate fertile fronds come up from the ground and are short, to about 1 foot high, erect, woody-like that brown up in late summer and remain until spring. It spreads quickly by rhizomes (underground stems) to form a colony or mass. I have seen this species growing in full sun and doing well where the soil is always wet; otherwise, it should have part-shade to full shade in rich, moist soil. It is occasionally planted in landscapes, but not commonly. It is offered by a good number of native plant nurseries and some larger, diverse conventional nurseries.

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By ILPARW on Sep 23, 2018 3:49 PM, concerning plant: Common Male Fern (Dryopteris filix-mas)

The Male Fern has the scientific name from Latin as "filix" = fern and "mas" = male. It was considered as the male form to the more common Lady Fern (from "filix femina") because it was similar and yet more robust. It is a very thick growing fern with semi-evergreen foliage. The fronds taper at each end. The frond stalks have orange-brown scales. The sori ( spots that produce the spores) are under the leaves in two rows. My Male Ferns are doing well on the east side of the house where the sunshine is strong until early afternoon and the slightly raised soil gets sort of dry in summer, usually. Those nurseries that offer a large selection of perennials usually sell some of this species; not every garden center sells this species. Therefore, it is not commonly planted, but found only occasionally in landscapes; especially landscapes by landscape designers or plant enthusiasts. It is native to most of North America from Newfoundland to British Colombia and from New England to the Pacific Northwest and to Texas, and it is native to Europe where it is more common.

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By ILPARW on Sep 23, 2018 3:09 PM, concerning plant: Lady Fern (Athyrium filix-femina)

Lady Fern is commonly sold at many conventional and native plant nurseries and is one of the most commonly planted ferns in landscapes and gardens in the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and Northeast US. The twice pinnate fronds are very soft and thin in texture. The sori (spore producing spot-like structures) are under the leaves and are curved to horseshoe-shaped. This species slowly spreads to become a colony. It is a very easy perennial to grow in most any garden as long as it receives shade during the middle of the day. It does get tattered in late summer, and it develops a yellow-brown fall color in October that is nice, so it is very deciduous.

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By ppeachpit on Sep 23, 2018 1:12 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Diva's Choice')

I have this daylily in both sun and shade, this flower is either splotchy or deformed in both. It is rare to have a good looking bloom. It is looking like the best bed is the compost!

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By kfrivard50 on Sep 22, 2018 4:38 PM, concerning plant: Rosa del Rio (Hibiscus striatus subsp. striatus)

I have a Rosa del Rio that is blooming. I have it in a container. The bloom only lasts about two days and then falls off. Is this usual.

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By ILPARW on Sep 22, 2018 9:34 AM, concerning plant: Prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata)

Prairie Cordgrass has a large native range in North America, covering most of Canada, up into the southern part of the Northwest Territory, and the United States, except for CA, NV, AR, FL, GA, SC, AL, & MS in swamps, marshes, and bottomlands. It is sometimes called Slough Grass or Ripgut because the fibrous leaf blades are tough and rough, and one can cut one's hand handling the sharp-edged blades, so wear gloves. The blades are about 4 feet long x 5/8 inch wide. The grass flowers blooming in August-September appear comb-like in appearance; (the species name of "pectinatus" does mean comb-like in Latin). This species produces lots of rhizomes and spreads quickly. It is a good choice for stabilizing water edges. In the 1990's I once planted a variegated cultivar of this in a terraced hill garden and it did make me unhappy that it wanted to spread too much, though it is pretty.

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By carlysuko on Sep 21, 2018 12:07 PM, concerning plant: Rose (Rosa 'Mary Rose')

This is a DA rose that seems to do very well here in my zone 10a climate. Very floriferous with huge petal packed blooms. A great re-bloomer as well. I don't grow it yet but I see it often at the Inez Grant Rose Gardens and it always looks outstanding!

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By ILPARW on Sep 21, 2018 9:11 AM, concerning plant: Royal Fern (Osmunda regalis)

Royal Fern has a huge native range in wetlands and swamps from tropical South America up into southern Canada and in Eurasia and Africa. It is sold by some larger, diverse conventional nurseries and native plant nurseries, but it is not common in landscapes and gardens. Most of the gardening public does not know this species and it does need constantly moist or draining wet soil to do well. This species produces brown fertile leaflets at the tips of the fronds. I would say this is the tallest and biggest fern species that I know of.

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By ILPARW on Sep 21, 2018 8:55 AM, concerning plant: Cinnamon Fern (Osmunda cinnamomea)

Cinnamon Fern is a common species in swamps and wet places in such areas all over the Northern Hemisphere. It is sold by larger, diverse conventional nurseries and native plant nurseries, but it is uncommon in most landscapes and gardens, even though it is such a pretty plant. Most of the gardening public does not know it. It does need a constantly moist or draining wet soil to do well. It bears shorter, upright fertile fronds that begin as green but turn cinnamon-colored when mature as the spores ripen in late spring. The longer sterile fronds of about 3 to 4 feet long are of a thick texture and turn a nice golden color in the fall.

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By ILPARW on Sep 21, 2018 8:32 AM, concerning plant: Ostrich Fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris)

Ostrich Fern is a common species that is native from Virginia way up to the Artic Circle and to northern Eurasia in swamps and moist open woods. It is commonly sold by many garden centers and commonly found in northern landscapes. It has bright green, soft, thin textured sterile fronds to about 5 feet long that are widest towards the top and tapering at the base. It also has shorter, stiff, fertile fronds that hold the sori (spore producing structures) that stay upright and brown into the winter. It needs soil that is constantly moist or wet to keep from having the fronds becoming tattered and browned in late summer. Most every year at my parent's home in northeast Illinois, the Ostrich Ferns I planted at the base of some shrubs would become browned, tattered, and falling down in late summer when it was normally dry. This species does spread a lot and quickly by its rhizomes (underground stems).

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By ILPARW on Sep 21, 2018 8:11 AM, concerning plant: Log Fern (Dryopteris celsa)

Log Fern is an uncommon species that is mostly native to the southeastern USA, but it also grows up into Illinois, Indiana, southwest Michigan, western New York & Pennsylvania & New Jersey, and spots in New England in moist or wet woodlands and swamps. It is a fairly tall fern about, 3 to 4 feet high, with upright, arching triangular fronds. The foliage is dark green, sort of glossy, and of a firm texture. Its sori (spore producing structures) are kidney-shaped spots under the leaves. There are scales on the petioles (leaf stems) that are brown with a dark central stripe. It does produce some short creeping rhizomes (underground stems) but this fern spreads very slowly and is "well-behaved" nest to some species that spread like crazy. The plant crown can be divided in spring or fall to propagate. While it is found in wet or very moist soils in nature, it does well in mesic, rich soil that is acid or neutral in a regular garden. I have one in my backyard and it is a handsome plant.

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By Australis on Sep 20, 2018 6:07 AM, concerning plant: Orchid (Paphiopedilum Leeanum)

This is the man-made form of Orchid (Paphiopedilum x leeanum).

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By Marilyn on Sep 19, 2018 11:48 PM, concerning plant: Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii 'Rossetto')

A Xera plant introduction.

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By Marilyn on Sep 19, 2018 11:45 PM, concerning plant: Anise Hyssop (Agastache 'Berry Princess')

A Xera plant introduction.

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By Marilyn on Sep 19, 2018 11:45 PM, concerning plant: Anise Hyssop (Agastache 'Lilac Moon')

A Xera plant introduction.

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By Deebie on Sep 19, 2018 4:52 PM, concerning plant: Jade Plant (Crassula ovata)

Grow Jade tree (crassula ovata) in a bright location, and pot in standard houseplant soil. Keep the soil somewhat dry all year. Interestingly, more plants can be be easily obtained by propagating from leaf cuttings.

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