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By jmorth on Oct 23, 2011 1:49 AM, concerning plant: Lion's Tail (Leonotis leonurus)

I believe the Wild Dagga designation refers to the African native perennial that is utilized in native culture to somewhat, shall we say, alter reality on a temporary basis.

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By kqcrna on Oct 22, 2011 9:22 PM, concerning plant: Gay Feather (Liatris spicata 'Kobold')

Liatris Kobold purple is a beautiful, upright spike of bright purple. It is drought tolerant and adds vertical accent to the garden. It attracts bees and butterflies.

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By sheryl on Oct 22, 2011 7:38 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Screaming Queen')

Sheesh - I want this one just for the name!!!

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By Marilyn on Oct 22, 2011 4:02 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Dandy Dave')

The parentage of 'Dandy Dave' is (Red Volunteer × Daring Dilemma). I grew both the parents in my garden and I really loved Red Volunteer! Gorgeous Red!

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By pardalinum on Oct 22, 2011 4:01 PM, concerning plant: Lily (Lilium 'Goldsmith')

This is a tetraploid strain of lilies hybridized by Judith Freeman. Being a strain and not a clone, there can be some variation from plant to plant but expect them to look very similar.

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By Marilyn on Oct 22, 2011 2:59 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Raspberry Bling')

Parentage: (Remembering Joan × (Bela Lugosi × Chance Encounter))

'Remembering Joan' is another of Gary Schaben's Daylily introductions which is in the parentage of 'Raspberry Bling'. 'Remembering Joan' is one I still grow and have been growing since I received it from Gary in 2001, along with 'North Wind Dancer' and these two are two of my all time favorites! Wonderful and very beautiful Daylilies!

I also grew 'Bela Lugosi' and 'Chance Encounter' and loved them!


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By valleylynn on Oct 22, 2011 2:08 PM, concerning plant: Species Iris (Iris domestica)

In 2005, based on molecular DNA sequence evidence, Belamcanda chinensis, the sole species in the genus Belamcanda, was transferred to the genus Iris and renamed Iris domestica.

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By valleylynn on Oct 22, 2011 1:35 PM, concerning plant: Wood Spurge (Euphorbia x martini 'Rudolph')

David Tristam branch sport selection of Euphorbia x martinii, its unique features are a rosette of bright red bracts during winter.
Remove flower heads after blooming.

Easy to grow in well draining soil. I planted it next to my lilies and it truly did keep the gophers away. For two years now I have been able to grow lilies.

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By Boopaints on Oct 22, 2011 12:14 PM, concerning plant: Gasteraloe (XGasteraloe 'Green Ice')

This is gorgeous! I've never seen it before.

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By valleylynn on Oct 22, 2011 11:42 AM, concerning plant: Gollum Jade (Crassula ovata 'Gollum')

This is a very easy plant and does not require much care.
It won't do well if you over water; it is very drought tolerant.
It is a very compact plant that is considered to be a hybrid of C. x portulacea by some experts. (a supposed cross between Crassula argentea and C. lactea).
Leaves are tubular, trumpet shaped, each of them tipped with a "suction cup" and are glossy green in color with very light spotting usually with bright red leaf margins; the new growth is red.
Blooms are small, star-like, white or pinkish-white, with pink stamens.
Can be bothered by mealy bugs during the winter when it blooms.

I have not had any problems with this plant in any way.

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By kqcrna on Oct 22, 2011 10:07 AM, concerning plant: Coleus (Coleus scutellarioides 'El Brighto')

El Brighto is well named. In a sunny spot its bright color and contrasts are outstanding. It is one of my biggest, heartiest, most vigorous coleuses. With adequate pinching it becomes a full, well-branched plant. It is easily propagated by stem or tip cuttings.

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By sandnsea2 on Oct 22, 2011 6:43 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Mary Todd')

Love this Daylily. It is a reliable, long bloomer for me both here in NC and in Mass. Everyone remarks on it and wants a division. A star!

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By SongofJoy on Oct 22, 2011 5:47 AM, concerning plant: Dancing Bones Cactus (Hatiora salicornioides)

This plant is fairly easy to root from stem sections or stem cuttings. Do not keep the soil wet or allow standing water in the saucer.

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By SongofJoy on Oct 22, 2011 5:44 AM, concerning plant: Gomphrena (Gomphrena globosa 'Little Purple Buddy')

The seed heads of this Gomphrena retain much of their purple color as they dry on the plant. Once the individual seeds become loose and easy to pull out, they are ready for harvest.

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By jmorth on Oct 22, 2011 2:39 AM, concerning plant: New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae)

Fantastic butterfly magnet in fall...I've had up to 8 Monarchs in 1 photo frame. Attracts Monarchs, Red Admirals, Painted Ladies, Skippers (various kinds including Silver Spotted, European, and Peck's), Sulphurs (Clouded, Cloudless, and Orange), Cabbage Whites and Checkered Whites, Swallowtails, Hairstreaks, Buckeyes, Question Marks and Commas, Pearl Crescents, and moths (day time ones).
That said, it should be noted, the Monarchs really take the show.

Used as a medicine by Chinese herbalists. Used as a love medicine by the Iroquois.
Flowers and leaves are edible.

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By Sharon on Oct 22, 2011 12:28 AM, concerning plant: Rhododendrons (Rhododendron)

My rhododendron was planted in 1971 and has been growing well since that time. As it ages, it is beginning to sprawl, but it is still a beautiful plant that doesn't require a lot of attention. It receives morning sun in its location, and dappled sunlight throughout the day. It has been known to rebloom in late fall, but with fewer blooms than in spring. It's about 5 feet tall and probably as wide as 4 feet.

Edit: After many many years through all kinds of weather, my rhododendron slowly died and though I tried, I could never revive it. It had recently survived a major ice storm in '09 and the summer of 2012 was spent in extreme drought. Those two factors destroyed a lot of plant life, but I think another factor might be the real culprit. The plant was here when we bought this house, though very very small. It was planted beside a corner brick column which is also a support structure for the house. The bricks and concrete went deep. As the rhody began to grow and increase in all directions, my guess is that it used up soil nutrients more quickly than if it had been planted away from the underground masonry. I failed to even think of that when I noticed its demise had already begun. At that point no amount of watering or feeding was going to help. I should have been amending the soil with good compost during all those years when I simply took it for granted.

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By valleylynn on Oct 22, 2011 12:27 AM, concerning plant: Echeveria (Echeveria runyonii 'Topsy Turvy')

Echeveria runyonii 'Topsy Turvy' is one of the true monstrose forms of Echeveria that "breeds true" and won't revert back to its natural form.

Echeveria runyonii is a Mexican native to rocky cliffs, discovered in the wild by Yucca Do Nursery in 1990 and named in honor of Dr. Runyon, who brought a Mexican garden specimen into the US in the early 1900s. Echeveria 'Topsy Turvy' is a unique form, named by former Huntington Gardens Director Myron Kimnack.

Dry soil and good drainage in winter are keys to survival in cold climates.

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By pardalinum on Oct 22, 2011 12:14 AM, concerning plant: Lily (Lilium 'African Queen')

African Queen is a strain of trumpets that will vary a bit in color but generally are yellow on the inside and darker on the outside of the petals.

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By valleylynn on Oct 21, 2011 9:32 PM, concerning plant: Hen and Chicks (Sempervivum arachnoideum 'Ali')

S. 'Ali' is one of my favorite arach. type semps. Nothing seems to bother it, not our rainy season or our 2 months of drought. It forms wonderful colonies of small (up to 2" across) web covered rosettes. It is also a prolific producer of offsets.
When it blooms it forms beautiful clusters of bright pink flowers that the bees find very attractive.

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By valleylynn on Oct 21, 2011 9:28 PM, concerning plant: Hen and Chicks (Sempervivum 'Abba ll')

S. 'Abba' is an easy to grow semp. It has held up very well in both our long rainy season and our 2 months of drought in the summer. It has not suffered from rot or dehydration.
Throughout the year it goes from a solid mid green to a lovely yellow/tan color, with red edging on the leaves. It is quite striking in the color stage.
Size is about 5" in diameter.
Very productive with at least 20 offsets per mature rosette.
Is not prone to bloom young.

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