Recently added comments

There are 19,972 comments posted to the database.

Page 907 of 999 • 1 ... 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 ... 999

By jmorth on Nov 19, 2011 7:50 PM, concerning plant: Dahlia 'Sonic Bloom'

Full and fluffy 5.5" blooms. Introduced in 2006.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By saltmarsh on Nov 19, 2011 5:39 PM, concerning plant: Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Sophie's Choice')

This is a very good tasting early tomato. It grew well and made an early crop before the heat hit, but gave up the ghost when the temp hit 90 degrees. It seems to like wet roots and is not drought tolerant. Most of the fruits were 5 to 8 ounces with some smaller. I use it for salads, slicing, skin slips well for canned tomatoes and sauces.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By flaflwrgrl on Nov 19, 2011 3:26 PM, concerning plant: Water Oak (Quercus nigra)

Larval host of the Horaces duskywing, White M hairstreak, & Northern hairstreak.
Considered a weed tree in some areas, but used effectively as a shade and street tree elsewhere. More weak-wooded and susceptible to wind and ice damage than most oaks. Older trees are susceptible to rot. Susceptibe to oak wilt, often with fatal consequences. Pine-oak rusts and leaf blister are two leaf ailments. Fast-growing.
Water Oak has a spreading, rounded, open canopy, and is most often used for a naturalized landscape. The acorns are particularly abundant on Water Oak and make good food for wildlife. They badly stain asphalt and concrete for several months in fall and winter. The leaves vary tremendously, from rounded and entire to three-lobed with several bristle tips but are most frequently spatulate. Water Oak is deciduous in the North, semi-evergreen in the Deep South.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Nov 19, 2011 2:14 PM, concerning plant: Pineapple Lily (Eucomis comosa 'Oakhurst')

Stunning.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Nov 19, 2011 1:59 PM, concerning plant: Hardy Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum x rubellum 'Mary Stoker')

Can form nice sized colony. When flowering, plants are smothered in single daisy flowers.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Nov 19, 2011 2:09 AM, concerning plant: Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum)

One cool tree. Autumn brings yellow-copper hue to leaves before dropped (1 of only a few conifer trees w/ deciduous habit). Tree is well suited to wet conditions (though conversely, is drought tolerant when established). Fast growth rate (2'/yr), can reach 60' in less than 25 years). Often utilized in landscaping. Native to the US.
When in standing water, often sends up large root projections called knees above surface of earth or water (note pics from Ft Worth).

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By valleylynn on Nov 19, 2011 2:04 AM, concerning plant: Yellow Grape Hyacinth (Muscari macrocarpum 'Golden Fragrance')

An Aegean native bulb that need well drained soil with sun and summer heat to do it's best.

Spikes of violet-tinted buds open to bright yellow blooms

Plants of this species go dormant in summer, and they generally prefer hot dry soils when dormant.
This species will naturalizes by self-seeding in favorable conditions, but, unlike most other species of Muscari, produces few bulb offsets.

USDA Zone 6, 'Golden Fragrance' will usually survive USDA Zone 5 winters if given a good winter mulch.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By valleylynn on Nov 19, 2011 1:43 AM, concerning plant: Bleeding Heart (Dicentra 'Red Fountain')

This is a very nice smaller variety of Dicentra, a cross between D Exinia x D Peregrina.

Nice clumping form with the flowers carried above the foliage. Prefers humus rich soil that is kept evenly moist.

Deer and rabbit resistant.

Will go dormant if the weather gets to hot, or doesn't get enough water.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Sharon on Nov 19, 2011 12:58 AM, concerning plant: Red Clover (Trifolium pratense)

Red clover is an old plant, celebrated historically for its magical powers. At one time it was credited with the ability to protect against evil and witchcraft. The four leaf clover, an occasional variety resulting from mutation, was and still is considered a sign of luck.

Medicinally it was used to ease coughing, colds, sore throats and skin irritations. Native Americans made a salve of it to help cure burns. In spring they also ate the leaves of the plant (a relative of the pea) as a vegetable. Red clover tea is still used by some herbalists as a remedy for sore throats.

In agriculture it is used as a soil improving cover crop, as fodder for cattle and it is a good source of nectar for honeybees.

Its name comes from the color of its blooms.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By valleylynn on Nov 19, 2011 12:47 AM, concerning plant: Shrubby Milkwort (Polygala chamaebuxus)

Polygala chamaebuxus was named by Linnaeus in 1753 and comes from the mountains of west-central Europe where it grows in the higher wooded slopes and up into the pastures and rocky ledges.

Blooms in January, February and March in the Pacific Northwest and May re-bloom in the summer if happy. Likes cool, peaty conditions.

Can be lightly pruned after blooming to tidy up the plant.

Forms a dense mats of little leaves and has a creeping habit.

It is a dwarf evergreen shrub that grows well in sunny conditions on a wide variety of well drained soils,
They are ideal Rock Garden or Peat Garden plants and will spread into compact, low growing shrubs, needing little attention.

This Polygala has creamy/white blooms with yellow lips that turn orange to crimson as the flowers age.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By Sharon on Nov 19, 2011 12:46 AM, concerning plant: Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

Tansy is an extremely hardy perennial with a strong smelling scent that acts as a natural insect repellant. Historically it was used to keep vermin and pests (lice, flies, fleas) out of homes and storage areas.

It was introduced from Europe and grows in most of the US. It's a nice background plant, growing in clumps about 3 feet high. It has feathery, dark green narrow, lance shaped leaves growing alternately along the stem. At the top of the stem the blooms appear in clusters of small, button-like, yellow flowerheads. They bloom from July to October.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By valleylynn on Nov 19, 2011 12:08 AM, concerning plant: Meadow Rue (Thalictrum aquilegifolium 'Black Stockings')

This plant can handle more sun if given plenty of water and will do best if given rich soil.

Leaves are a nice bright green color and contrast well with the almost black stems.

Nice addition to the woodland garden.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By valleylynn on Nov 18, 2011 11:17 PM, concerning plant: Downy Violet (Viola pubescens var. pubescens)

This plant does well in dry woodland conditions and is a native to the United States.

Easily grown in average, medium to wet, well-drained soils in part shade. Does not spread by runners. May self-seed in optimum growing conditions.

Mass or group in rock gardens, border fronts, woodland gardens, wildflower gardens or native plant gardens.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By valleylynn on Nov 18, 2011 8:45 PM, concerning plant: Pink Heron's Bill (Erodium reichardii 'Bishop's Form')

The University of Reading Department of Botany with DNA analysis finally confirmed that E. variabile is a naturally occurring hybrid of E. corsicum with E. reichardii.

Survives best in mild winter regions, but in cold climates it is easily wintered in a pot indoors, then brought back outside for the summer. Has survived in my zone 8 with very good draining gravely soil.

This plant is a very slow grower so need to be planted where it won't have to compete with more aggressive growing plants that might over run it. Does really well in alpine type beds.
Very drought tolerant once established.

Divide in the spring for more plants.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Nov 18, 2011 2:51 PM, concerning plant: Cyclamineus Narcissus (Narcissus 'Kaydee')

Introduced in 1984. Bred by Brian Duncan from seedling of N. Foundling X N. Delta Wings.
Excellent for forcing. My personal favorite. Getting hard to find.
After forcing, translocatible to garden for more blooming seasons.
Division 6 - Cyclamineus.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Nov 18, 2011 2:17 PM, concerning plant: Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris)

Could be considered invasive.
Could be considered architectural.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Nov 18, 2011 2:04 PM, concerning plant: Ornamental Onion (Allium schubertii)

One of the most unique flower presentations out there.
Volleyball to beach ball sized flower groups of differing lengths composed of star shaped florets. Shorter florets grow out a couple inches - female; longer (outer ring) out to 8"+ - male. 2 tier effect.
One supplier describes it as 'bizarre spaceship with many antennas' (B&B). May be suitable for forcing. Most bulbs imported from Israel (I think). Another description says it presents a fireworks-like appearance (JS).
First time viewers always inquire and are usually utterly amazed.
Circa 1896. Another supplier lists a historical cultural date of 1594.
One's grown in my garden (Z6a/5b) usually last but one season if it's a cold season, warmer winters they survive.
Supposedly forcible over winter; my first attempt didn't.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Nov 18, 2011 1:29 PM, concerning plant: Star of Persia (Allium cristophii)

One of the earliest to bloom Alliums.
Softball size flowering head.
Adds an architectural dimension in garden.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Nov 18, 2011 11:58 AM, concerning plant: Silver Bells (Ornithogalum nutans)

Naturalised in E. US Z6. Goes back to 1594 historically.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

By jmorth on Nov 18, 2011 11:40 AM, concerning plant: Sun Star (Ornithogalum dubium)

Native of Cape Province, S. Africa.
15 to 20 6-petaled florets form one large spherical flower. Blooms over a relatively long period winter/spring.
Good for cool greenhouse or cool conditions under lights. Goes dormant after flowering.

[ Give a thumbs up | Reply to this comment ]

Page 907 of 999 • 1 ... 903 904 905 906 907 908 909 910 911 ... 999

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by plantmanager and is called "Blue My Mind"